Home » Japan
Categorieslatest

Beijing selected to host 2027 track and field world championships

The 2027 track and field world championships have been awarded to Beijing. The World Athletics Council reached the decision Wednesday to bring the meet back to China after the country hosted the event in 2015. The decision comes on the heels of the Italian track federation announcing earlier in the day that it withdrew its candidacy to stage the 2027 worlds in Rome after the government refused to guarantee the $92 million needed to host the event. China is also hosting the world indoor championships next year in Nanjing. The country hosted the 2008 Summer Olympics and the 2022 Winter Games in Beijing. “This poses a massive opportunity to grow our sport and fan base in one of the biggest commercial markets in the world,” World Athletics president Sebastian Coe said in a statement. The 2025 world championships will be held in Tokyo. Last summer, track’s big event was staged in Budapest, Hungary, and the summer before in Eugene, Oregon. “With the announcement of China as our next host,” Coe said, “our last four World Athletics Championships have now been awarded to the world’s four largest economies; the USA (Oregon), the EU (Budapest), Japan (Tokyo) and China (Beijing).” © Copyright 2024 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Categorieslatest

Go Japan

A Japan soccer fans cheers is seen in the stand ahead of the final qualifier for the Paris Olympic women’s soccer tournament between Japan and North Korea at the National Stadium in Tokyo on Wednesday. Japan won the game 2-1. © AP

Categorieslatest

S. Korea keeps shattering its own record for lowest fertility rate

South Korea has set a fresh record for the world’s lowest fertility rate as the impact of the nation’s aging demographics looms large for its medical system, social welfare provision and economic growth.The number of babies expected per woman in a lifetime fell to 0.72 last year from 0.78 in 2022, according to data released Wednesday by South Korea’s national statistics office. The number of births also slid by 7.7% to 230,000, setting a new low for comparable data in a nation of about 50 million people.The lack of babies is speeding up the aging of South Korean society, generating concerns about the growing fiscal burden of public pensions and health care.

Categorieslatest

India’s massive farmer protests spark police brutality claims

SHAMBHU, India — Hardeep Singh marched among a sea of fellow farmers toward India’s capital Delhi in what he thought was a peaceful protest. Then it descended into chaos. Police lead shot and teargas rained down on protesters demonstrating for better conditions, and the 28-year-old Singh was wounded.

Categorieslatest

Indonesia palm oil firms warn of food security risks as biodiesel use rises

JAKARTA — Indonesian palm oil producers are voicing concerns that the continuing rise in domestic demand for biofuels could harm the country’s food security and take a toll on exports amid stagnant production of the commodity. Consumption of palm oil for biodiesel in Indonesia surpassed that for food for the first time last year, according to the Indonesian Palm Oil Association, commonly known as GAPKI from its Indonesian initials. About 46% of the total 23.2 million metric tonnes was for biodiesel, versus 44% for food and 10% for oleochemicals, used in the production of items like hand sanitizers and soaps.

Categorieslatest

Indonesia’s next president must not roll back democracy

Indonesian Defense Minister Prabowo Subianto is on track to become the country’s next president. With his vice-presidential running mate none other than the eldest son of incumbent President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo, Prabowo won public support during the Feb. 14 election by promising to maintain the course of the current government, which remains highly popular. The country held the Group of 20 presidency in 2022 and is a pillar of the “Global South” grouping of emerging and developing countries. In today’s uncertain international climate, it is reassuring that the world’s largest direct election, with 200 million voters, went smoothly and laid the groundwork for the current policies to be continued.

Categorieslatest

‘Clever but random’: Wikipedia’s Jimmy Wales on the subtler risks of AI

HONG KONG — Around 30 years ago, Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales was having a conversation with a friend about the possibility of artificial intelligence. They thought that if AI did ever arrive, it would be a very serious and fact-based technology, without imagination or creativity. Now, Wales said, he is surprised by what AI can do: It’s not very good at facts, but it is really creative. The rise of generative AI, particularly the continuous evolution of OpenAI’s ChatGPT, has raised serious questions for the online nonprofit encyclopedia, whose content is maintained by a community of volunteer editors.

Categorieslatest

It’s the Wolf! Student Discovers Extinct Species

TOKYO, Feb 28 (News On Japan) – A taxidermy specimen stored at the National Museum of Nature and Science as “a type of wild dog” has been identified as the now-extinct Japanese wolf. The first to notice that it might be a Japanese wolf was a junior high school student from Tokyo, who, along with experts, conducted research and recently announced their findings. The paper was published by Hina Komori, a first-year junior high school student from Tokyo, and a research team including members from the National Museum of Nature and Science. Four years ago, when Komori was in the fourth grade, she visited a special public event at the museum’s storage facility in Tsukuba City, Ibaraki Prefecture, where she noticed that one of the taxidermy specimens resembled the Japanese wolf she had seen in picture books and other references. Although the specimen had been stored as “a type of wild dog,” detailed research by Komori and experts based on the size of the body and historical records from the label of the taxidermy suggested that it was likely a Japanese wolf that had been kept at Ueno Zoo over a hundred years ago. The findings were compiled into a paper over two years and announced this month. According to the research team, the Japanese wolf once inhabited Japan widely but is believed to have gone extinct about 100 years ago. There are only a few remaining specimens of taxidermy or fur samples in Japan and abroad. Komori commented, “When I saw the features like the flat shape from the forehead to the nose, the short forelegs, and the black hair on the back, I had a feeling like a radar going ‘beep’—it must be a Japanese wolf. I was so excited in my head, like I wanted to start dancing or performing a dance.” After learning that the taxidermy had been treated as “a type of wild dog” and not thoroughly examined, Komori consulted with experts while investigating past records made public by museums. In her fifth grade, she compiled a report as a personal research project, suggesting that the taxidermy might be a Japanese wolf. The report won the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Award at a contest organized by the Library Promotion Foundation. One of the experts she consulted, Sayaka Kobayashi, a researcher at the Yamashina Institute for Ornithology in Chiba Prefecture, who is knowledgeable about the history of specimens, suggested, “I want these research findings to be preserved in an academic paper.” To conduct an objective analysis for the paper, Komori spent another two years on analysis and review. After peer review by experts, the paper was published on the 22nd of this month in an electronic journal issued by the National Museum of Nature and Science. Kobayashi praised Komori’s observational skills and encouraged her to continue deepening her interest in the field she is passionate about. Shinichiro Kawada, a co-author of the paper and a senior researcher at the Animal Research Department of the National Museum of Nature and Science, appraised Komori’s discovery and paper writing at such a young age as “amazing” and looked forward to her future discoveries. The museum houses over 5 million items, including the newly identified Japanese wolf taxidermy and other historically valuable specimens, making it the largest collection in Japan. In August last year, the museum conducted crowdfunding to support the management of its precious collection, raising over 900 million yen, far exceeding the target amount, with support from over 50,000 people. Kawada, who is also responsible for managing the vast collection of animal taxidermy at the museum, recognized the importance of preserving valuable collections for the future through this discovery. He mentioned that there are quite a few specimens whose origins are not yet understood, and it is crucial to preserve them for future research with new technologies. Although the newly discovered taxidermy is not currently planned for public display, another Japanese wolf taxidermy is exhibited at the museum in Ueno, Tokyo, and is available for viewing. Source: NHK

Verified by MonsterInsights