Home » Ireland
Categorieslatest

Charolais bullocks average €3.24/kg at Ballinrobe Mart

Ballinrobe Mart in Co. Mayo seen the overall cattle trade remain strong this week, despite recent moves by processors to reduce beef price. According to mart manager Teresa Gibsey, there was “a high demand for heifers, with prices reaching €1,870/head or €3.72/kg”. Heifer prices ranged from €460-1,870/head or €2.00-3.72/kg. The average price paid for Angus-cross heifers on the day was €2.71/kg. Meanwhile, the average price paid for Charolais-cross heifers was €3.02/kg, while Limousin-cross heifers made an average price of €2.91/kg. Heifers weighing over the 500kg mark sold for an average price of €2.88/kg and heifers in the 400kg-500kg weight bracket sold for an average price of €2.78/kg. The top prices from the heifer sale included: Limousin heifer weighing 600kg sold for €1,870 or €3.12/kg; Limousin heifer weighing 595kg sold for €1,840 or €3.09/kg; Charolais heifer weighing 585kgsold for €1,810 or €3.09/kg; Angus heifer weighing 505kgsold for €1,420 or €2.81/kg; Angus heifer weighing 262kg sold for €830 or €3.16/kg; Charolais heifer weighing 250kgsold for €930 or €3.72/kg; Limousin heifer weighing 175kg sold for €600 or €3.43/kg. Commenting on the trade seen in the bullock sale and the mart manager described the trade as being “on fire for bullocks, especially yearling bullocks”. Bullock prices ranged from €500-2,070/head or €2.02-4.09/kg. The average price paid for Angus bullocks was €2.71/kg while Charolais bullocks averaged €3.24/kg. Limousin bullocks averaged €3.47/kg. The average for bullocks weighing 500kg and above was €2.59/kg and bullocks in the 400 to 500kg weight bracket made an average price of €2.80/kg. Lighter bullocks in the 300kg to 400kg weight bracket averaged €3.10/kg. Top prices on the day were: Simmental bullock weighing 760kg sold for €2,070 or €2.72/kg; Limousinbullock weighing 615kg sold for €1,890 or €3.07/kg; Charolais bullock weighing 395kg sold for €1,360 or €3.44/kg; Angus bullock weighing 385kg sold for €1,190 or €3.09/kg; Limousin bullock weighing 320kg sold for €1,310 or €4.09/kg; Angus bullock weighing 300kg sold for €1,040 or €3.47/kg. Dry cows made from €400 to €2,070 with the best price going to an eight year old Charolais cow weighing 755kg selling for €2.74/kg or €2070. Another Simmental cow weighing 740kg made €1,690 or €2.28/kg. The average sale price for cows was €2.08/kg. A cow and calf unit made €2,220 for a five year old Limousin cow with an April-born bull calf at foot. Ballinrobe Mart is set to host an end of the month continental bullock sale on Wednesday, May 29, and the mart manager added: “This is the last chance to buy stock for the 28-week period to have them ready for our end-of-year sale on December 11. Sheep sale at Ballinrobe Mart Numbers in the sheep sale on Thursday, May 16, were described as “still high for the month of May with “good quality sheep on offer”. One of the most notable prices of the sale was €236/head paid for a batch of 65kg hoggets. Another notable sale was a pen of spring lambs weighing 42kg, which fetched an impressive price of €4.62/kg or €194/head. Lambs were making from €2.22-4.62/kg with an average of €3.97/kg or €60-236 with an average of €183 holding firm to previous weeks. Sample prices from the sheep sale: 54kg sold for €228/head or €4.22/kg; 52kg sold for €215/head or €4.13/kg; 46.5kg sold for €200/head or €4.30/kg; 43kg sold for €183/head or €4.26/kg. Prices for ewes with lambs at foot ranged from €120-295. Cull ewes ranged from €68-212/head with an average of €144/head paid. Sample prices for cull ewes included: 92kg made €212 or €2.30/kg; 78kg made €180 or €2.31/kg; 70kg made €16 or €2.34/kg. Ballinrobe Mart hosts its sheep sale every Thursday.

Categorieslatest

Former special adviser to Micheál Martin received a €145,000 exit package

The adviser, who has not been identified, received the lump sum as a redundancy or severance payment. The figures were released to Social Democrats TD Catherine Murphy in response to a parliamentary question asking for all severance payments in excess of €100,000. In his reply in March, Leo Varadkar, who was then taoiseach, said a minister’s personal staff on temporary contracts were entitled to severance payments, including statutory redundancy, when their contracts were terminated. This usually happens following a change of government. “For the period specified, there was one severance/redundancy payment made by the Department of the Taoiseach in excess of €100,000 and that was €145,444 paid to the special adviser,” he said. Exit payments to former civil and public servants have come under scrutiny The sum compares to an exit package of €101,234 to a former special adviser to a minister in the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine in 2020. A second former special adviser to a minister in that department received an exit package of €83,608 in the same year. Exit payments to former civil and public servants have come under scrutiny following revelations of the packages paid to departing executives in RTÉ. Breda O’Keeffe, the former chief financial officer, received an exit package of €450,000 that was “rounded down” and recorded as €400,000 in the accounts. Former director of strategy Rory Coveney, who was behind the Toy Show The Musical that cost RTE €2.3m, also received an exit payment but the amount has not been officially disclosed. RTE director-general Kevin Bakhurst has declined to confirm if Ms O’Keeffe’s successor as chief financial officer, Richard Collins, also got an exit package. Mr Bakhurst has said the figures would be in RTÉ’s annual accounts. Dublin Airport Authority paid €56m in redundancy and exit deals for 166 staff since 2019. Of these, 54 staff received an average payment of €370,000 in 2021. Dublin Port paid an exit package of more than €200,000 to one person last year. Eirgrid has also paid an exit package in excess of €200,000. The HSE paid out more than €2m exit payments to staff in six years. The costs include termination payments of €1.62m to 18 staff as well as legal costs.

Categorieslatest

Bruce Springsteen in Dublin: Croke Park concert setlist, weather forecast, ticket information and more

Bruce Springsteen is on the home stretch of his four-date Irish tour, having enthralled, delighted and surprised thousands and thousands of fans in Belfast on Thursday of last week and Nowlan Park, Kilkenny, on Sunday. Some 40,000 at Páirc Uí Chaoimh in Cork on Thursday night were even treated to a rendition of Santa Claus is Comin’ to Town. Springsteen finished his set on a rainy night in Cork with a moving version of The Pogues’ Rainy Night in Soho, in tribute to the late Shane MacGowan. He plays the final concert of the tour at Croke Park in Dublin on Sunday, May 19th. The concert be a particular achievement for the The Boss: it will mark one million in ticket sales since his first concert in the country in 1985 at Slane Castle, Co Meath. In a five-star review Stuart Bailie described the night in Belfast as “an immense show” and dedicated to lost friends and, as Springsteen put it, “things that leave us, and what remains”. For anyone heading to Cork on Thursday, here’s what you need to know. In Nowlan Park last Sunday, fans praised a “phenomenal evening” which included a touching tribute to Shane MacGowan. Springsteen opened the show with a cover version of The Pogues’s Rainy Night in Soho, in memory of MacGowan, who died in November 2023. For anyone heading to Croke Park on Sunday, here’s what you need to know. [ ‘Kilkenny loves Bruce!’: Springsteen fans on a ‘phenomenal evening’ and tribute to Shane MacGowan ] [ Bruce Springsteen in Belfast review ★★★★★: The Boss kicks off with No Surrender, then builds a momentous set ] [ In pictures: Bruce Springsteen’s No Surrender live show in Belfast ] Can I still buy tickets for the show? While the concert is officially sold out, there are some resale tickets available on Ticketmaster. The promoters advise only buying tickets from authorised sellers. The ticket box office, at the junction of Gills Corner and North Circular Road, will be open from 2pm on concert day. What time does the gig start? The venue opens at 5pm and Springsteen and his band will be on stage at 7pm sharp. There is no support act and he is expected to play for three hours. [ A million reasons why Bruce Springsteen keeps coming back to Ireland ] [ Passion, booze, madness and comradeship: Bruce Springsteen’s special relationship with Ireland ] What songs will he play? Springsteen set lists can be unpredictable – he often picks a song from placards held up by fans and plays it. Here is what The Boss played in Cork on Thursday: Who’ll Stop the Rain (Creedence Clearwater Revival cover)YoungstownSeedsLonesome DayGhostsLetter to YouThe Promised LandHungry HeartLight of Day (sign request)Atlantic City (sign request)Darlington CountySanta Claus Is Comin’ to Town (sign request)My City of RuinsNightshift (Commodores cover)Last Man Standing (acoustic)BackstreetsBecause the NightShe’s the OneWrecking BallThe RisingBadlandsThunder Road Encore Born to RunBobby JeanDancing in the DarkTenth Avenue Freeze-OutTwist and Shout (The Top Notes cover)A Rainy Night in Soho (The Pogues cover) How do I get to the venue? Croke Park is well served by public transport. Bus, rail, Dart and Luas transport options can all bring you within walking distance of the venue. O’Connell street is a 15-20 minute walk to the stadium. Plan your journey online from anywhere in Ireland to the venue via transportforireland.ie [ Passion, booze, madness and comradeship: Bruce Springsteen’s special relationship with Ireland ] Will roads be closed in the area around the venue? Temporary road closures will be put in place as required before and after the show. For full details please check garda.ie. What are the entry requirements to the venue? Download your tickets from your Ticketmaster account to your iPhone wallet/Google Pay wallet in advance of show day. Screenshots or printouts of digital tickets will not be accepted. No under-14s will be allowed entry to the standing/pitch area and will only be permitted in seating areas. All under-16s must be accompanied by a person 18-plus. All under-14s must have seated tickets as they will not be permitted on the pitch/standing area. Children under six will not be admitted. All people entering the stadium must have a valid ticket. Can I queue early at the venue? Early queuing is not permitted. Ticket holders are requested to respect the privacy of the residents and businesses in the local community. What can I bring or not bring to the concert? Prohibited items include flag poles, selfie sticks and sticks for banners. Umbrellas, professional cameras and recording devices (this will apply to cameras that have detachable lenses), bottles, glass vessels, cans, flasks, flares, laser devices, prams/push chairs, inflatable and folding chairs are also prohibited. Concertgoers are advised not bring a bag unless it is necessary. People without bags will be fast-tracked. Can I leave and re-enter the venue throughout the day? No. Once you leave the venue on the show day, re-entry will not be possible. What’s the weather going to be like? Weather forecast here Sunday is expected to be a mostly dry day with sunny spells. Highs of 17 to 21 or 22 degrees with light northerly or variable breezes are forecast. As this is an outdoor concert, dress appropriately for inclement weather. Will there be a designated area for wheelchair users? Yes. Please note space within this area is limited. Please check availability through ticketmaster.ie. Sign up for push alerts and have the best news, analysis and comment delivered directly to your phoneFind The Irish Times on WhatsApp and stay up to dateOur In The News podcast is now published daily – Find the latest episode here

Categorieslatest

Adrian Dunbar on Beckett: ‘I seemed to be getting knocked around emotionally but didn’t know how he was doing it’

Samuel Beckett and Paris. The two go together like Lucky and Pozzo. It’s the city where the writer spent much of his adult life, where a street is named after him, where he was stabbed by a pimp outside La Santé prison, where he was a permanent fixture in Left Bank cafes, where he strolled with James Joyce along the leafy Île aux Cygnes, and where he died and is buried, beside his wife, Suzanne, in Montparnasse Cemetery. But Beckett and Liverpool? It’s a more tangential connection, forged through Beckett: Confined 2022 and Beckett: Unbound 2024, two intriguing networks of mixed-genre events, emanating from the writer’s work and located between the two cities. They are the results of a burgeoning partnership between the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Irish Studies, the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies at the University of Notre Dame, and Unreal Cities, a multidisciplinary arts project founded in 2020 by the actor and director Adrian Dunbar and the saxophonist and composer Nick Roth. The name Unreal Cities echoes one of the most memorable lines in TS Eliot’s great poem The Waste Land. Eliot, in turn, had taken it from Les Fleurs du Mal, by the 19th-century French poet Charles Baudelaire. It amounts to a trio of artistic influences that reflects the company’s declared creative ethos of the power of three. “The name comes directly from The Waste Land, as that was the first time that Nick and I collaborated together, at the Happy Days Festival in Enniskillen,” says Dunbar. “We realised that it was a production that we could take further, that could have another life. It went to the Hay Festival and to Alexandria in Egypt, and has had a series of lives since then.” Dunbar is speaking from Leitrim, where he and Roth have been rehearsing his new version of the radio play All That Fall, for Beckett: Unbound, and A Fool’s Errand, a touring piece inspired by Dermot Healy’s epic poem about the annual migration of barnacle geese between Greenland and Co Sligo. It brings together music, text and painting and is delivered by the actor Lalor Roddy, the painter Diarmuid Delargy and three musicians. Dunbar and Roth are the curators of both Beckett: Confined and Beckett: Unbound. The first traced the writer’s ability to close and unravel spaces across and between genres, locations and environments, and examined his “politics of confinement”. This time around, building on the success of the 2022 event, they have assembled another tantalising rattle bag of new work and variations on existing pieces. ‘Adrian [Dunbar] came up with the idea and title of Beckett: Unbound, the inverse of the confinement theme. It’s explosive and communicates with instant energy. It signalled a welcome release after the tension of the lockdowns’— Composer Nick Roth Beckett: Unbound kicks off in Liverpool on May 30th and, in association with the Irish Cultural Centre, moves to Paris on June 5th. It is structured around a challenging mix of theatre, music, film, dance, photography and discussion, with the central focus on Beckett’s untrammelled fascination with communication and the technological traversals of time and distance. The company’s partnership with the University of Liverpool was instigated by Prof Peter Shirlow, director of the university’s Institute of Irish Studies, to whom Dunbar was introduced by family members. Shirlow, formerly deputy director of the Institute for Conflict Transformation and Social Justice at Queen’s University Belfast, had attended several events produced by Unreal Cities and invited the company to present some work by Beckett in Liverpool. “His department is constantly looking at ways of opening itself out into the city, which has a big Irish community,” says Dunbar. “I spoke to Nick, and we started to think about what we had to hand that we could put together, maybe in the form of a small festival. I already had my productions of Catastrophe and Ohio Impromptu, and Nick had some new music. Given what was going on at the time with the pandemic, the theme of confinement just presented itself.” [ Between Foxrock and a hard place – Frank McNally on Samuel Beckett’s Cooldrinagh ] “It was just after Covid, so everyone was used to the idea of being closed in,” says Roth. “I curated the music programme, and we also made a new film with music. It was a great success, and we were asked to come back the following year and do it again. But we felt that to do it annually was too much, so we suggested a biennale, which would give us more time to commission new work and effectively bring everything together. “Adrian came up with the idea and title of Beckett: Unbound, the inverse of the confinement theme. It’s explosive and communicates with instant energy. It signalled a welcome release after the tension of the lockdowns. In that highly charged spirit of energy and breaking free, we commissioned four new works: a dance piece, two musical compositions and a film.” The first of the two music world premieres is Kevin Volans’s Quad, a string-quintet transcription of the movement sequences embedded in Beckett’s eponymous television play, which, at the time of its 1984 publication, was described as a ballet for four people. The second is Mouth, a solo percussion transcription by Simon Roth in response to Beckett’s evocative Not I/Pas moi monologue, which Clara Simpson will perform back to back in French and English. The piece explores the sonic semantics of Billie Whitelaw’s famous 1973 delivery of the piece, in which she heard what she called her own “inner scream”. ‘We wanted to include dance on the programme to mix up the disciplines. We try to diversify as much as possible, so we thought that to include a dance component would be exciting’— Nick Roth Sentient is a new dance piece from the choreographer Liz Roche, in collaboration with Roth and the French composer and performer Nathalie Forget. This full-length work for six dancers picks up on a passage in Beckett’s novel Molloy, where the narrator expresses wonder for the movement of his bees: “I often thought of my bees… And I thought above all of their dance, for my bees danced oh not as men dance, to amuse themselves, but in a different way.” “We wanted to include dance on the programme to mix up the disciplines,” says Roth. “We try to diversify as much as possible, so we thought that to include a dance component would be exciting. I’ve long been an admirer of Liz Roche’s work and had discussed with her various ideas for new pieces. In 2014 I did a residency at the [Irish Cultural Centre] and met Nathalie Forget, who plays the Ondes Martenot, an early electronic instrument. She lent me a book about Beckett and animals, which contained an essay about the dance of the bees in Molloy. Bees use dance to communicate, a thought I shared with Liz. That’s where the piece started. Thinking about the score, I loved the idea of the hum of the bees, and that brought in Nathalie and the opportunity to co-score together. Again, the power of three.” The theatre programme features two French-language productions from the distinguished pairing of the actor Denis Lavant and director Jacques Osinski. They will bring their highly praised version of Krapp’s Last Tape (La Dernière Bande) to Liverpool, for its UK premiere, while Endgame (Fin de Partie) will begin a five-week run at Théâtre de l’Atelier, in Montmartre. The inclusion of Schubert’s String Quartet No 14 in All That Fall is one of only two directions Beckett gave for a specific composition. A new sound design by Roth frames Dunbar’s reimagining of the original radio play, whose dark, relentless climax contrasts sharply with the slapstick humour of its early scenes. It will be performed by Orla Charlton, Anna Nygh, Frank McCusker, Vincent Higgins, Stanley Townsend and Frankie McCafferty. ‘I first engaged with [Beckett] when I was at drama school in London. I did a couple of Beckett pieces there, which I found fascinating because I couldn’t understand how he was able to get you to an emotional place by some kind of legerdemain’— Adrian Dunbar Roth mentions his friend James Little, a jazz musician and Beckett scholar, whose book Samuel Beckett in Confinement: The Politics of Closed Space examines Beckett’s work in prisons. He says that it breathed new life into a previously slumbrous Unreal Cities project, which here comes to fruition in the shape of Rough for Radio II, a radio play written in French as Pochade Radiophonique and translated into English by Beckett shortly before its broadcast by BBC Radio 3 in 1976. This version has been recorded by inmates at HM Prison Liverpool, directed by Vincent Higgins in collaboration with Simon Duding of Tipp, an organisation that delivers arts projects within the criminal-justice system. Dunbar, who is from Enniskillen, the Co Fermanagh town where Beckett went to boarding school, concedes that, subconsciously, his connection to the writer goes back a lifetime. [ À la recherche des pubs perdus – Frank McNally on visiting Paris again ] “Yeah, I guess he’s always been there. I first engaged with him when I was at drama school in London. I did a couple of Beckett pieces there, which I found fascinating because I couldn’t understand how he was able to get you to an emotional place by some kind of legerdemain. I couldn’t get past him as a sort of magician, because I seemed to be getting knocked around the place emotionally but I didn’t know how he was doing it. “Then came Happy Days, where Nick and I met and where, over the years, I did a number of productions. When I was at the Irish Cultural Centre I got to know Paris a bit better and then I did the BBC documentary Searching for Sam and went down to Roussillon, in the south of France, where he had lived. There I got a real sense of his physical journey, and that took me closer to him again.” Roth’s first encounter with Beckett was at Happy Days 2014, when his ensemble did an intervention on a production of Waiting for Godot in Yiddish, a piece that, coincidentally, Dunbar had seen in New York and brought to Enniskillen. He also worked with Conor Lovett and Stephen Dillane on Gare St Lazare Ireland’s six-hour film of Beckett’s How It Is. “The idea of coincidence and synergy and things kind of happening are important threads in our work,” says Roth. “It feels like an affirmation that you’re on the right path. That’s why curating this festival takes two years, bringing everything together and folding in all the layers. We are trying to make a holistic programme, where all the parts are talking to each other and the resonances build between them.” “One of the things that we strongly believe is that art is simply seeing the connection between things,” says Dunbar. “People who see the connection between people are artists. We’re constantly looking to see what those connections are, or might be, and then making them happen. That’s the transformative thing that makes a piece of work, but it only starts to happen by connecting. You have to find out where the allusions are, where they come together, and then you can start out to make something that’s whole. When you start to get a sense of it all coming together, it’s a brilliant feeling. It allows everyone a place in the work.” Beckett: Unbound 2024 runs from Thursday, May 30th, to Friday, June 7th

Categorieslatest

Britain’s Got Talent judge Simon Cowell dropped four stone by cutting out four foods

Simon Cowell sustainably lost four stone by making changes to his diet and exercise routines. The Britain’s Got Talent judge began making changes to his lifestyle after a fall in his home in 2017, but another incident pushed him to dedicate himself further to a healthier lifestyle. He was in an accident in 2020 which nearly left him paralysed after he fell off his electric bike in his home and broke his back. Read more:Ant McPartlin’s ex Lisa Armstrong shares emotional message as he welcomes his first child He had six hours of surgery after breaking his back falling from the electric bike – with the accident showing him how ‘unfit’ he was. Simon said that doctors were shocked by his unhealthy lifestyle. “He did my blood work and pee and all the rest of it, and a month later the results came in and his words were, ‘You have the worst diet out of all the clients I have ever seen in my life — you have a schoolboy’s diet from the 1960s’,” he told the Sun. Simon was then advised to cut four things from his diet to improve his health – red meat, dairy, sugar and gluten. “He sent me a list of things I can’t eat, and that included red meat, dairy, sugar and gluten. And I pretty much stuck to it,” said Simon. He has said he eats white meat and “loads” of vegetables – and can even fit drinking beer into his diet plan. Being on a diet means he has make sensible choices about what he eats, but has learned to make interesting and tasty meals without falling back into his old habits. He has also said that if he is going out for dinner and knows he will not eat anything on the menu, he fixes himself up some baked beans on toast before they leave and doesn’t have a meal in the restaurant. Along with a healthy diet, Simon appears to have a gruelling workout routine. Back in 2020, the music mogul revealed on Britain’s Got Talent: Unseen Bits that he does 150 press ups every single morning. As well as that, Simon enjoys cycling, walking and weight lifting.

Categorieslatest

Watch: Michelin-star chefs using Irish beef visit Kilkenny farm

Over 50 international chefs who are members of the Chefs’ Irish Beef Club (CIBC) took part in a three-day visit to Ireland this week (Monday May 13) to mark the 20th anniversary of the club. The CIBC is a forum of leading and Michelin-starred chefs who publicly endorse Irish beef and was founded by Bord Bia in 2004. A number of these international high-profile foodservice personnel visited John Phelan’s beef farm in Co. Kilkenny to see first-hand the farms where Irish beef is produced. Agriland was in attendance on the day to find out more about the CIBC and what the member chefs had to say about Irish beef. Speaking to Agriland, Dirk Mooren who is a chef and owner of two restaurants in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, recently joined the CIBC and said: “There’s quite a few old mentors of mine in this group.” Commenting on the beef he uses in his restaurant, he said: “We use bigger cuts because we grill a lot on open flames. “This is why the Irish beef is good for it as well because there is not too much fat inside the meat and it wont drip too much and burn the meat.” When asked if the beef was popular with his customers, he said: “It absolutely is. It’s flying out.” He explained the reasons for sourcing beef for his two restaurants from Ireland citing Irish weather and grass-based systems for cattle grazing as some of the reasons. Bord Bia Heading up the CIBC on behalf of Bord Bia is Laura Crowley, who is also the Bord Bia manager for the Netherlands. She said: “The Chefs’ Irish Beef Club consists of a network of culinary experts in eight of our key export markets for beef. “The markets the club operates in are Germany, Belgium, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Sweden and the United Arab Emirates. The CIBC leader said: “There are about 55 chefs traveling with us. It’s truly unique because all eight chapters are traveling simultaneously. “They are all cooking at Michelin-star level or equivalent so these are at the top of their game and are also very influential in their markets so other restaurants look to them. “We bring them to Ireland so that their experience of Irish farming and Irish beef is authentic. We don’t script what they say about Irish beef. it all comes from the heart that is really, really powerful.” Crowley continued: “This year is a really interesting year, because as you can see now, we’re at a farm, so it’s an opportunity for the chefs to cook the farmers’ own product for him. “We like to think about the passion, the commitment, or the skill that goes into raising the cattle is matched at the end of the chain with the passion, commitment and skill of these top chefs.” Michelin-star chef Erik Van Loo from Rotterdam said he has been a member of the CIBC for “almost 20 years” and said he has visited Ireland “maybe nine times already”. He explained that he has a preference for using Irish beef, saying: “The meat is more tender, juicy and flavoury” and said people like it “very much” in Holland. The delegates in attendance at the farm walk received a tour of John Phelan’s beef farm and sampled some grass-fed beef and lamb from Dawn Meats that was cooked on the Barbeque after the farm walk. Local artisan food producers were also in attendance with their produce on exhibition also.

Categorieslatest

‘I was told I had aggressive cancer on Christmas Day, but now I am disease-free’ – cancer patient reveals how

It should have been an occasion of festive celebration, but on Christmas Day 2019 Sandra Whelan received the devastating news that she had an aggressive form of kidney cancer. The 60-year-old grandmother from Kiltipper in Dublin, who worked for 20 years in the Dropping Well bar and restaurant in Milltown, had only recently noticed she had passed some blood and decided to get it checked out.

Categorieslatest

The Irish women who conquered Everest: ‘Not knowing he was missing probably saved my life. We went out in the

On May 18, 2004, Clare O’Leary, a 33-year-old doctor from Bandon, Co Cork, stood on the earth’s highest point. Dr O’Leary had just become the first Irish woman to summit Mount Everest (8,848.86 metres). She was also the sixth Irish mountaineer to achieve the feat. Dawson Stelfox was the first in May 1993. Roll on 20 years and Dr O’Leary is one of 885 women globally to that have achieved success on Everest according to irishsevensummits.com. Women account for just 7pc of the 11,997 people that have successfully reached the top of the mountain since the first ascent by Sherpa Tenzing Norgay and Edmund Hillary in 1953.

Categorieslatest

Hotel Review: This cosy, classy stay may just be Killarney’s best-kept secret

Inside The Victoria, a cosy stay that could be Killarney’s best-kept secret In Ulysses, a famous puzzle is pondered — how to cross Dublin without passing a pub. If James Joyce had set his novel in Killarney, I wonder would he have switched that to hotels and guesthouses? The Kingdom’s tourist hub has tonnes of places to stay, but one cosy, classy little gem slipped under the radar for me until very recently — John and Sinéad Courtney’s The Victoria.

Verified by MonsterInsights