Home » Page 876
Categorieslatest

JSMP Hakarak Governu Halo Rekrutamentu Por Méritu ba Komisáriu KAK

Facebook Twitter Messenger Messenger WhatsApp Telegram Share via Email 0 N. freitas Send an email March 19, 2024Last Updated: March 19, 2024 1 Facebook Twitter Messenger Messenger WhatsApp Telegram Share via Email Show More Share Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Pinterest WhatsApp Line Share via Email Read Next Notísia Kalan March 19, 2024 Defisiente Anderson Marques Simu Apoiu Husi Gabinete PR Notísia Kalan March 19, 2024 Plantasaun Kafé Ne’ebé Governu Reabilita Barak Mak Mate Notísia Kalan March 19, 2024 JSMP husu PN Halo Alterasaun ba Lei Indultu Notísia Kalan March 19, 2024 Mario Ximenes Rekoñese Impede Terrenu ba Projetu PNDS Iha Kuluhun March 19, 2024 Defisiente Anderson Marques Simu Apoiu Husi Gabinete PR March 19, 2024 Plantasaun Kafé Ne’ebé Governu Reabilita Barak Mak Mate March 19, 2024 JSMP husu PN Halo Alterasaun ba Lei Indultu March 19, 2024 Mario Ximenes Rekoñese Impede Terrenu ba Projetu PNDS Iha Kuluhun Defisiente Anderson Marques Simu Apoiu Husi Gabinete PR Related Articles Ekipa Konjunta Hetan Ona Mate… March 19, 2024 Vise-MOP Husu Kompañia Sunrise No… March 17, 2024 Autoridade Manufahi Hapara Atividade Husi… March 17, 2024 Patrimoniu Estadu Tula Sai Ona… March 17, 2024 Check Also Close Patrimoniu Estadu Tula Sai Ona Motorizadas Husi Komandu PNTL Dili March 17, 2024 PNTL Dili Detein Suspeitu Nain Tolu Husi Kazu Asaltu Malu Iha Madohi March 17, 2024 Estadu Igreja Katolika Selebra Tinan 11 Eleisaun Papa Francisco March 17, 2024 Tomada De Pose Ba Membru Asembleia Postu Administrativu March 16, 2024 Facebook LinkedIn Messenger Messenger Share via Email Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Telegram Viber Back to top button error: ! Close Search for Close Search for

Categorieslatest

Wreckers, splitters and sell-outs – echoes of 2001 as deal once more divides unionism

Fast forward 23 years and the DUP – dominant for almost a quarter of a century – are facing their own challenge from a party almost as uncompromising as they were with the Ulster Unionists. As things stand, Jim Allister’s party aren’t poised to replace the DUP at the top of the unionist tree any time soon – but they are ready to take them on, come what may. Yesterday, the TUV leader told the BBC “there are no DUP seats, there are no Sinn Fein seats – they are the people’s seats” as he vowed to challenge all “protocol implementers” at the general election – including anti-deal DUP MPs. The DUP MP Gregory Campbell said the TUV were taking a “wrecking ball” approach to unionist politics. He said: “Their wrecking and splitting approach will be music to the ears of those who want to see fewer Unionist MPs elected to Westminster. “This approach to ‘strengthening the Union’ from the TUV is to weaken and divide unionism and in effect do the job of those who want to ensure a weaker and divided unionism is delivered”. Mr Allister is unbending in his opposition to any manifestation of the Irish Sea border – and he argues that most ordinary unionists are too. Back in 2001, Mr Campbell said of his decision to run against a fellow anti-Belfast agreement unionist, the UUP’s Willie Ross: “There is now in place a system of Government to which the majority of unionists take exception. Since the Belfast Agreement has been signed there has been a majority of UUP MPs at Westminster who are opposed to its implementation”. Mr Campbell won the seat, saying of his victory: “There is a God in heaven”. The reasoning by the DUP over twenty years ago to run against even anti-agreement Ulster Unionists was that the political arrangements were so intolerable there had to be change. Today, Jim Allister feels he is in the same position. He said the TUV – Reform UK alliance is “affording unionists the opportunity to reject the protocol. To reject an Irish Sea border. To reject being governed by foreign laws we don’t make, we can’t change. And to reassert our demand that our place is fully restored within the United Kingdom”. The DUP don’t see it that way. They say their deal has restored Northern Ireland’s place in UK and some even argue it has removed the Irish Sea border. DUP MLA Phillip Brett responded to Mr Allister, saying: “Unionism as a whole across NI wants to see representation maximised – I think that’s where the vast majority of unionists are at. It’s just a great pity that Jim Allister’s focus seems to be on attacking fellow unionists rather than supporting that goal of maximising our representation across Northern Ireland”. A few hours later his DUP colleague Gregory Campbell was on the attack himself – criticising the TUV – Reform UK pact. “Unionists across Northern Ireland are wiser to the nonsense being talked by some who themselves not so long ago voted for the Protocol in the European Parliament”, he said. The TUV Causeway councillor Allister Kyle – a likely candidate to challenge Mr Campbell in East Londonderry – said “Gregory Campbell, who won his Westminster seat from a Unionist who resolutely took a stand against the Belfast Agreement only to become a cheerleader for terrorist inclusive government a short time later, is in no position to talk about ‘wrecking’ Unionism”. He added: “As for his snide comments about how people have voted in relation to EU law, Unionists need only look at how his DUP colleagues in the Assembly backed a ban on British soil not so long ago to see how seriously such remarks should be taken.” The 2024 election is different from 2001 for many reasons – not least because unionism is in a much weaker position. Many in the TUV appreciate they’re unlikely to beat the DUP – but they do want to punish them at the ballot box – even if that means non-unionist parties taking the seats. The starting gun has been fired on the election race, and the unionist electorate must once again decide if they stick with the biggest party and ‘bank the gains’ they achieved – or take exception to the deal at the ballot box.

Categorieslatest

Okanagan crews battle two early-season wildfires amid dry conditions

It’s a cautionary tale about just how dry conditions are in the Okanagan as crews battled two early-season wildfires this weekend. A wildfire sparked in the Creighton Valley area, just outside of Lumby, B.C., Sunday afternoon. “As you can see there is snow all around us but on the south-facing slope it is really dry,” said Lumby Fire Chief Tony Clayton. The fire quickly grew to around three hectares before firefighters prevented it from growing any larger. As of Sunday evening, BC Wildfire Service (BCWS) classified the fire as ‘being held’ and not likely to spread beyond predetermined boundaries. “(It was an) absolute surprise to be honest. It is really early in the year for something like this. I don’t think I’ve ever seen it before, actually,” said Lumby Mayor Kevin Acton. In the South Okanagan, the Penticton Indian Band responded to a wildfire Sunday night near Fish Lake Road in Summerland. The size of the fire is unknown, but it was classified as being held only hours after it was first discovered. “That sends a pretty strong message, having a fire like that this time of year – in March – it sends a pretty strong message that it is dry out there,” said Summerland Mayor Doug Holmes. “We had drought conditions last year and they are expanding into this year and it is going to be a super, super dry spring and summer and people have to be extra careful.” Both wildfires on Sunday are believed to be human-caused, and fire officials are urging people to be extra vigilant. “If you are doing any burning, whether it’s having a campfire or Category 2 or Category 3 open burn, ensure that you’re using caution,” said Kamloops Fire Centre Information Officer Melaine Bibeau. “And definitely, if people are recreating in the backcountry, using dirt bikes or anything like that, again, just practicing that vigilance. Ensuring that when you’re in drier areas that you’re aware of your surroundings and also if you are recreating in the backcountry, if you see smoke, we definitely encourage people like call it in.” The provincial government warns there will likely be an early start to the 2024 wildfire season given the current conditions across B.C. According to B.C.’s Emergency Management and Climate Readiness Minister Bowinn Ma, the province is taking action earlier than ever to better prepare for what they believe will be recurring and worsening emergencies. “Preparations for this year’s wildfire season are already well underway,” said Ma in a press release. “We have seen the devastating consequences of climate change on our communities and we are using lessons learned from last year to strengthen our approach to emergencies. By taking a whole-of-government approach and working with local governments, First Nations and emergency-response partners, we can ensure we are as prepared as possible for whatever might come.” While officials jump into action early, people are also being asked to do their part – to prepare now for wildfire season.

Categorieslatest

Jeff Lynne announces final ELO tour, including Detroit stop in October

Jeff Lynne’s ELO will stage a final North American tour this summer and fall, including an Oct. 9 show at Detroit’s Little Caesars Arena. The Over and Out Tour, announced Monday, marks the end of the road for a band that launched in the early 1970s as Electric Light Orchestra before racking up a slew rock and pop hits such as “Telephone Line,” “Livin’ Thing,” “Mr. Blue Sky” and “Strange Magic.” Tickets for the LCA show and other tour dates will go on sale at 10 a.m. Friday through Ticketmaster. A presale will start at 10 a.m. Wednesday at jefflynneselo.com. Lynne, who went on to become one of the leading studio producers in rock, rekindled the ELO legacy in 2018 with a tour that included an LCA date, the group’s first in Michigan since the early ’80s. The band returned to the road the next year, with another LCA stop.

Categorieslatest

Temperatures dip just in time for first day of spring

The weather has taken a major downturn — just in time for spring. Tuesday marks the first day of spring and in honor of the new season, metro Detroit is giving a true Michigan welcome with whiplash-inspiring weather conditions. While last week gave us a taste of warmer temperatures on the horizon, this week is putting us on the ropes with cold temperatures and even a special appearance by snow flurries. Tuesday is reaching a measly high of 48 degrees in the evening, giving us the warmest temperatures of the week, before dipping into a low of 32 come nighttime. The rest of the week will follow suit, with highs in the upper 30s and lows in the upper 20s and mid-30s. The culprit behind this sudden cold snap? The jet stream reached farther south than it has throughout the winter, allowing Canadian air masses to spill into the Great Lakes region, said meteorologist Kyle Klein, who is stationed at the National Weather Service’s White Lake station. The good news is while this likely is not the last cold snap of the season, we might not experience the magnitude of this switch in temperatures for a while. Temperatures are expected only to reach the upper 30s through the weekend, but hope is coming. Next week, temperatures are anticipated to climb into the 50s with lows in the upper 30s. mmarini@freepress.com

Categorieslatest

Detroit Tigers Newsletter: Jace Jung’s bat looks mighty close to MLB-ready

We know, we know: All the signs of Opening Day fast approaching were out in force this weekend. The teeth-gnashing over the NCAA tournament brackets. The Red Wings’ playoff chances rapidly cratering with a disappointing road loss. Even the snow falling in and around Comerica Park on Sunday screamed one thing (as much as snow can scream, but you get it): We’re less than two weeks from baseball that counts. (And less than that, actually, as the L.A. Dodgers and San Diego Padres open the regular season at 6:05 a.m. Wednesday in South Korea. But we’ll get to that in a bit.) But as easy as it is to look ahead to March 28, when the Detroit Tigers will take the field in Chicago against the White Sox, we actually spent Saturday looking a little farther ahead. Hello, and welcome to the Farm-to-CoPa Newsletter! Yes, while the Tigers’ main squad was thumping the Pittsburgh Pirates — their sixth win in eight games last week — in Bradenton, their prospects, from the full spectrum of minor-league levels, were facing off with the Phillies prospects in Lakeland in MLB’s new “Spring Breakout” series, giving us a chance (once we dusted off the ol’ MLB.com login) to scope out a fair swath of the organization’s top prospects (according, as always, to MLB Pipeline) all at once. Although we didn’t get to see every prospect we hoped for — notably, infielder Kevin McGonigle, the Chase Utley clone drafted at No. 37 by the Tigers in July, was out with a hamstring strain — there were still plenty of highlights from six notable names: [ Sign up for our Detroit Tigers newsletter for Tigers analysissent directly to your inbox. ] Max Clark The Tigers’ first-round pick in July — at No. 3 overall out of high school in Indiana — led off Saturday. He went 0-for-2, but worked a six-pitch walk that showed solid plate judgment as Phillies righty Michael Mercado, a 2017 second-rounder nearly six years his senior, tried to get him to bite on inside pitches. Once on base, Clark showed the athleticism that led the Tigers to pass on more established college hitters in the draft; he broke for second on a second-pitch four-seam fastball clocked at 96 mph and beat the throw easily, sliding feet-first into second and popping up on the bag, with a bit of a collision with the shortstop before he could even attempt to bring the tag down. Of course, that wasn’t the only notable collision of Clark’s spring. As the Freep’s Evan Petzold discovered this week, Clark had a run-in on the road earlier this month with a Tigers fan in his new Corvette. Find out how Clark made a new fan after the accident, and what the incident reveals about the team’s top prospect. READ MORE: How Tigers No. 1 prospect Max Clark learned to be himself again Brant Hurter The lanky lefty has drawn rave reviews this spring — manager A.J. Hinch was succinct with the Freep’s Jeff Seidel, saying: “I love Hurter.” — and for good reason, as his work in the strike zone has resulted in just one earned run on four hits and two walks, with seven strikeouts in eight innings. Saturday brought more of the same, as Hurter allowed one run on three hits with no walks and 29 strikes thrown in 45 pitches over three innings. That included four strikeouts: In the first, he got Gabriel Rincones Jr., the Phillies’ No. 10 prospect, swinging on a 9.6 mph sinker in the zone for a strike-‘em-out, throw-‘em-out double play (more on that in a bit). Opening the second, he victimized catcher Eduardo Tait, Philly’s No. 9 prospect, in a way that’ll seem familiar to anyone who has seen Javier Báez attempt to deal with a slider away; pitch Nos. 1, 2 and 4 broke away from the lefty-hitting batter, with the final pitch just missing the plate — and Tait’s bat. Strikeout No. 3, by Carlos De La Cruz (Philly’s No. 13 prospect) rto end the second inning, showcased Hurter’s command of his changeup — two to open the at-bat around 85 mph — and then a high 92-6 mph four-seam fastball that De La Cruz couldn’t catch up to. Hurter then opened the third inning by getting Caleb Ricketts, No. 21 on Philly’s prospects list, with a sharp 93.7 mph sinker at the knees for a called strike on the eighth pitch of the at-bat. Jace Jung The Tigers’ 2022 first-round pick, and their No. 4 prospect, showed why he’s tantalizingly close to the majors in just three plate appearances. With two outs in the first, he launched an 88.8 mph changeup, middle-middle from righty Mick Abel (the Phils’ No. 2 prospect, expected to make his MLB debut this summer) 362 feet into the Tigers bullpen at Joker Marchant Stadium. In the third, he worked a four-pitch walk, laying off four high four-seamers from Michael Mercado. In the fifth, Jung got to Griff McGarry, Philly’s No. 11 prospect whose name is a bit better than his cutter; the infielder launched the 91.2 mph pitch just above his knees 412 feet to right-center, with this dinger landing on the walkway above the Tigers’ bullpen to make it a 3-1 Tigers lead. Trei Cruz The Tigers’ 2020 third-round pick isn’t among the team’s top 30 prospects (according to MLB Pipeline), but he helped his stock last season in a couple ways. First, in 120 Double-A games, he hit 14 homers — four more than he had in 180 games over his first two seasons. Second — and perhaps more importantly, considering the Tigers’ emphasis on defensive versatility — he played at least 14 games at four different positions. And sure enough, he starred with his glove against the Phils (despite going 0-for-4) —Cruz was involved in all three double plays turned by the Tigers. We’ll give him just partial credit for the first DP, as the shortstop who applied the tag to No. 3 prospect Aidan Miller on the first-inning caught-stealing DP fueled by a laser from catcher Dillon Dingler. In the fourth, Cruz and the Tigers infield victimized Rincones (at the plate) and Miller (on the bases) again, as Hao-Yu Lee — the prospect picked up from the Phils in August’s Michael Lorenzen trade — fielded and fired to Cruz at second, and he connected with first baseman Jake Holton to clear the bases. In the sixth, Rincones came up again, this time with the bases loaded and one out. And again, Cruz came through, fielding a grounder and getting the out at second, then firing to Holton at first to end the inning. Cruz’s sharpness at short wasn’t a surprise — he logged 310 innings there in Erie, and as he told Our Man Petzold this winter, “I’ve always played infield. I’ve always felt like I could play center field, definitely fast enough and athletic enough to do it, but I never thought of it because I’ve felt good at shortstop.” — but it’s good to see the Tigers have options should Báez struggle with his … glove. Troy Melton The California native went from a backup catcher in high school to a walk-on at San Diego State to the Tigers’ fourth-round pick in 2022 — and then it got interesting. As Our Man Seidel has detailed, the Tigers reworked his mechanics, turning him into a right-handed flamethrower. And then some — Melton needed just 18 pitches to plow through a perfect two innings against the Phillies prospects. Of those, 12 were strikes, and 12 were four-seam fastballs that topped out at 97.8 mph, bottomed out at 94.7 mph and averaged 96.7 mph. Wilmer Flores And, finally, there was the Venezuelan right-hander, who was the organization’s Pitcher of the Year in 2022 then seemingly took a step back last season in Double-A with a 4.02 ERA. On in relief in the ninth, the 6-foot-4 Flores racked up two strikeouts as part of his 19-pitch outing. He was still a bit wild, with a four-pitch walk when he couldn’t command his four-seamer, but Flores also used a nasty curveball for whiffs of the Phillies’ No. 30 (Nikau Pouaka-Grego) and No. 7 (Devin Saltiban) prospects. With a curve working in the low 80s, a slider in the high 80s and a fastball that topped out at 99.5 mph, Flores certainly lived up to the hype that landed him back at No. 10 on the Tigers’ prospect list this spring — and the stuff that might land him in the Tigers’ bullpen this summer. The trial of Jobe There was one prospect missing from Saturday’s kids-table game: Jackson Jobe — because he was with the grownups for an MLB spring training start. And did he ever look all grown up, needing just 13 pitches to sit down the three Minnesota Twins he faced. It was an eye-opening performance by the 2021 first-round pick — for himself, as well. The former No. 3 overall pick may have had a bit of extra adrenaline going as he hit 101.8 mph on the Joker Marchant Stadium radar gun. More importantly, Jobe showed some maturity that may get him to the Comerica Park mound sooner rather than later, according to Our Man Petzold. Back to the majors Of course, before then, the Tigers will need a bullpen this spring. And a rotation. And a lineup. Whole 26-man roster, we guess. And while most of the positions are set — Tork’s on first, Javy’s at short, Tarik’s on the mound as often as possible, we hope — there are still some left to be determined over the final eight games of spring training. Our Man Petzold spent some time analyzing all the spots over the weekend; find out how he sees the six-arms-for-five-rotation-spots conundrum getting sorted out. Mann(ing) on fire Entering the spring, right-hander Matt Manning looked like he might be the odd man out. Yes, he started the Tigers’ combined no-hitter in July. But he also missed a lot of time with a twice-broken right foot and struggled with his control. And now? Manning has struck out 11 of the 32 batters he has faced, with just four hits allowed. All four of those hits have been homers, which isn’t ideal — but that seems pretty unsustainable all season, too. So what has changed for Manning? He has found his edge, according to Our Man Petzold. Get the details on what catcher Jake Rogers calls “Classic Matt.” Carp on the line There’s one key Tiger without a true position heading into Opening Day: Kerry Carpenter. With Miguel Cabrera’s retirement (and return to camp as a part-time coach), Carpenter will likely log a lot of games at designated hitter. But he’ll still see time in the field, as well. Is he worried about that uncertainty? Nope. As Our Man Seidel observed last week, Carpenter is a man of certainty in all things: At the plate. In his faith. And in his love of his new wife, Lauren, a former Texas softball player. Here is the full story of the courtship (and her talent as a BP pitcher). Mark your calendar As we mentioned earlier, the MLB season will officially begin Wednesday morning when Tyler Glasnow takes the mound for the Dodgers against the Padres (who’ll have Yu Darvish toeing the rubber) at 6 a.m. on ESPN. A little closer to home (by 17 hours or so, via airplane), the Tigers will be getting some screen time of their own with back-to-back-to-back games on Bally Sports Detroit on Tuesday-Thursday against the Phillies, Twins and Mets, respectively. Tuesday’s game starts at 6:05 p.m., while the other two start at 1:05 (allowing for a cool 4 hours of napping between the LA/SD game and the Tigers/Twins matchup Wednesday), and Tuesday’s and Thursday’s games will feature new play-by-play man Jason Benetti, freed from his basketball duties by the NCAA tournament, on the mic. TL;DR Of course, one downside of watching a couple hours of Tigers prospects is that you become very aware of your own advancing age. And then you sit down to write a newsletter and see that former closer (and avant-garde hat enthusiast) Fernando Rodney turns 47 on Monday … and that he threw 17 innings for Gigantes del Cibao in the Domincan Winter League this offseason. (Y’know, just in case the Tigers need any veteran arms before Flores and Jobe are ready.) Other Tigers birthdays this week: José Valverde (46 on Sunday). Sign up for our Tigers newsletter for analysissent directly to your inbox each Monday. Contact Ryan Ford at rford@freepress.com. Follow him on X @theford. This story has been updated to reflect Yu Darvish’s birthplace.

Categorieslatest

Perkins warns of athlete deaths in Enhanced Games

Camera IconOlympic gold medallist Kieren Perkins says allowing athletes to take drugs will end in disaster. (Mick Tsikas/AAP PHOTOS) Credit: AAP Perkins warns of athlete deaths in Enhanced Games Melissa WoodsAAPMarch 19, 2024 8:54AM Topics Share to FacebookShare to TwitterEmail UsCopy the Link

Categorieslatest

B.C. officials warn of early, ‘challenging’ wildfire season

Government and wildfire officials in British Columbia are warning that the province could see an early and active spring wildfire season due to persistent drought conditions that have left soil parched and snowpack levels low. Premier David Eby said Monday the summer “might be a very difficult one” after a record-breaking wildfire season in 2023. Officials say early outlooks indicate a “high probability” of above normal temperatures across B.C. in the coming months, but added that drought and wildfire conditions this year will depend on the actual weather in the spring and summer. The chance that the province will see enough spring “rainfall to alleviate drought conditions is unlikely but possible,” according to the B.C. Wildfire Service (BCWS). “We are certainly seeing some of the variables line up that we could have a very challenging fire season,” BCWS superintendent of predictive services Neal McLaughlin said during a media availability in Vancouver on Monday. McLaughlin said crews are already busy monitoring approximately 90 holdover wildfires in the northeast that have smoldered through the winter, adding that once the snow melts and the land dries out, drier air and moderate winds will be enough for them to start burning again. Eight new human-caused fires have also been sparked since Jan. 1, he said, amid incredibly warm, dry and windy conditions. B.C.’s average snowpack levels were 66 per cent below average for this time of year on March 1, according to hydrologist Jonathan Boyd with B.C.’s River Forecast Centre, the second lowest for that date in the last 50 years. That puts most of the province at an overall decreased risk for flooding this year compared to last year, Boyd said, but there is still a risk that too much rain could fall too quickly or warm temperatures could cause rapid snowmelt leading to flooding. “Before potential drought impacts are felt [on wildfires], we have to get through a snowmelt-related flood season,” he said. The majority of B.C.’s soil is also at high drought code levels, according to BCWS, which McLaughlin said can exacerbate flooding risks and also leave the vegetation primed to burn in a wildfire. ‘Climate change is here upon us’ Officials from BCWS and the River Forecast Centre appeared alongside three provincial ministers to urge British Columbians to prepare for the likely possibility of yet another challenging wildfire season. “We are doing this earlier than we ever have before,” said BCWS director of operations Cliff Chapman. Minister of Emergency Preparedness Bowinn Ma urged British Columbians at risk to make an evacuation plan with their families and to register with the province’s new evacuee portal in advance in case they need to flee. “What we are seeing … is that climate change is here upon us, and that the impacts to communities are impacts we are already experiencing day to day, week to week, month to month and year to year,” Ma said in response to a CBC question about what the early warnings signalled to residents. “This is not about making people scared, this is about encouraging people to be prepared.” Ma and Forests Minister Bruce Ralston said the province has been working directly with First Nations and local governments to bolster wildfire preparedness this year as it shifts BCWS to a year-round operation. BCWS is also purchasing more planes, helicopters and other firefighting equipment, in addition to opening a new logistics centre near Prince George, Ralston said. On Monday, the province announced BCWS will be launching predictive software to model fire risks using existing maps and weather models with observations from staff in the field. The technology was already piloted in the Coastal and Kamloops fire centres last year, and will roll out provincewide by the end of 2024. “During a wildfire, this technology will help BCWS make critical decisions,” said Ralston.

Categorieslatest

Varsity elevates don to professorial cadre

A pioneer faculty member of McPherson University, Seriki Sotayo, Ogun State, Dr Isaac Onigbinde, has been promoted to the professorial cadre with effect from October 1, 2022. A statement by McPherson University said the decision was based on the recommendation of the Appointments and Promotions Committee (Academic) at its 19th Statutory Meeting held on February 14, 2024, and which was subsequently ratified at the 42nd Statutory Meeting of the Governing Council of the University on February 15, 2024. It said Onigbinde obtained his West African Senior School Certificate at Ifelodun Comprehensive Grammar School, Ilajue, Oyo State in 1996 as the overall best student. “He later proceeded to the University of Lagos, Akoka, Lagos State, where he bagged a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology in 2002. He later obtained a postgraduate diploma in Business Administration in 2005 from the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State. He thereafter capped his academic pursuit with a master’s degree in Business Administration with specialisation in Marketing from UNILAG in 2008; and a doctoral degree in Marketing and Strategic Management from Babcock University, Ilishan-Remo, Ogun State, in 2013. He was an Associate Research Professor in Marketing Science at the Arab Academy for Management Sciences, Cairo, Egypt (Djibouti Campus) in 2019,” it read in part. It added that Onigbinde had a remarkable stint in the organised private sector before he veered into academics in October 2010. He joined the services of McPherson University in October 2012 and rose meteorically through the ranks to become an Associate Professor in 2019 and a full Professor in October 2022. The versatile scholar has to his credit over sixty scholarly publications in high-impact journals, books and conference proceedings. The statement added that Onigbinde had served McPherson University in various capacities. “He was a recipient of the NYSC Merit Award in 2004 and the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Excellence and Productivity in 2023, among others. He is currently the Director, Directorate of Academic Planning as well as a Member representing the Senate in the Governing Council of the University. “He is a Fellow, the Chartered Institute of Marketing, United Kingdom, and Fellow, of the National Institute of Marketing of Nigeria. He is widely travelled and has attended several academic conferences and workshops within and outside Nigeria. Meanwhile, the Vice-Chancellor, Prof. Francis Igbasan, has congratulated the don on his academic attainment and he wished him the very best in his career and the development of the University.

Categorieslatest

‘Remarkable’: Opposition Questions Decision to Axe Spy Chiefs from Peak Body

The Albanese Labor government has some explaining to do, according to Shadow Foreign Affairs Spokesperson Simon Birmingham. His comments come after revelations the federal government removed Australia’s top spy chiefs from the National Security Committee (NSC), the peak decision-making body for security and threats to the country. The NSC normally comprises cabinet ministers and the heads of Australia’s intelligence organisations, including the Australian Security and Intelligence Organisation (ASIO, and the equivalent of MI5 and the FBI overseas), as well as the Australian Secret Intelligence Service (ASIS, like MI6 and the CIA). However, on March 18, in the lead-up to an official visit by Beijing’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi to Canberra, Director-Generals Mike Burgess (ASIO), and Kerri Hartland (ASIS) were revealed to have been axed from the peak body. The opposition’s Mr. Birmingham called the allegations “remarkable.” “ASIO and ASIS have long been regular attenders at NSC meetings and in doing so, I can speak from personal experience, that they provide valuable insight into discussions and, of course, deep knowledge and intelligence understanding,” he told reporters at Parliament House on the morning of March 19. “It’s never possible in NSC discussions to pre-empt every direction that a conversation may go in. And that’s why having them at the table is valuable. To ensure that the intelligence and analysis is available when it’s needed to inform the decisions and thinking of ministers around the table,” he said. “To only have them on an as-invited basis, reduces the capacity of these agencies to be able to give the critical advice that is necessary. “If these reports are true, then the Albanese government should be upfront about who is or is not invited on a routine basis to its NSC meetings, then the Albanese government should reverse this decision because it’s important that ministers get the best intelligence advice at the time they need it.” The surprise move also comes amid comments from Labor Trade Minister Don Farrell, who quipped in Parliament on March 18 that he was “not sure” the United States was Australia’s closest ally. “I’m not sure the United States is our most trusted ally,” he told the Senate. “I would have said New Zealand in the whole history of time. “I would have said our closest international ally is New Zealand. But we are very close to the United States, I freely concede that.” Senator Farrell’s comments and the NSC decision all come as Foreign Minister Wang touches down in Australia. Previously, the tariffs were imposed as part of a series of trade sanctions against Australia in 2020 following calls from then-Prime Minister Scott Morrison for an international inquiry into the origins of COVID-19. Beijing had also frozen out then-ministers from diplomatic meetings in response to moves to counteract Beijing’s foreign interference and surveillance, including the 2018 5G ban on Huawei and the passing of foreign interference laws. However, with the accession of the Labor Party to government in May 2022, there has been a concerted effort to “normalise” ties between Canberra and Beijing, and a more muted response to Beijing’s hostile activities. For example, in late 2023, Prime Minister Anthony Albanese was accused of keeping quiet about a Beijing-instigated sonar incident that injured Australian navy divers, despite meeting with CCP leader Xi Jinping around the same time. The government at the time said the decision was made in conjunction with several other departments including the Departments of Defence, Foreign Affairs, Attorney-General, Home Affairs, and Office of National Intelligence.

Verified by MonsterInsights