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Taddy firm brews equal leave policy

All new parents will be offered up to 52 weeks of leave, 26 of which are fully paid, and a further 12 weeks fully paid for neonatal care if needed. In addition, all parents will qualify for up to 10 paid keeping in touch days and paid antenatal appointments, while those taking more than 26 weeks leave will qualify for a phased return to work for the first four weeks, working 80% of their hours while receiving 100% of their pay. Molson Coors Beverage Company employs more than 2,200 people across the UK including Tadcaster. By introducing the new policy to enhance parental leave for all employees irrespective of gender, it is aiming to kick out the ‘secondary carer’ label often given to those that can’t take more time off from the workplace. The new policy is the latest step in Molson Coors’ aim to become a more inclusive employer, following its decision last year to scrap CVs for certain roles to encourage a more diverse range of applicants. READ MORE: Molson Coors announces major spend at Tower Brewery in Tadcaster Record-breaking beer Madri brewed not in Madrid but Tadcaster In 2019 the brewer also launched ‘life leave’, giving employees an extra two weeks of annual leave they can use for significant life moments like moving house or helping to settle a loved one into a new caring arrangement. There are currently less than 100 companies in the UK and Ireland* that offer some form of gender-neutral parent leave that removes the principle of a primary and secondary carer, and only a handful of manufacturing companies, such as Molson Coors, which tend to have significantly higher numbers of men in their workforce. Phil Whitehead, Managing Director, Western Europe at Molson Coors Beverage Company, said: “We’re always looking at ways to drive for more gender diversity at every level of our business, and to create a more inclusive and equitable work experience for everyone. Our new Equal Parent Leave policy is a really important next step to achieving those ambitions. “At its most simple and powerful level, Equal Parent Leave recognises that parents should be able to choose how to care for their young children, rather than it being a decision made for them by their employers largely rooted in traditional assumptions about primary and secondary carer roles. “One parent taking on the lion’s share of caring for children may be the right thing to do for many families, but I want it to be a choice – a positive choice that isn’t based on gender stereotypes or having to decide who is the primary or secondary carer. “As a business that is part of a typically male-dominated industry, we have an opportunity to help break down those stereotypes and help to challenge the ‘secondary carer’ label – which is often taken on by new fathers. “We want to make it easier for fathers to be able to take more time away from work as a new parent, because we know that by doing that, we are also helping to give mothers more choice and families the opportunity to start that parenting journey on a more equal footing.” Commenting on the new policy, Tommy Elliott, customer development executive at Molson Coors and dad to two young children, said: “I’ve been through those early years as a parent in that ‘secondary carer’ box so I know just how much this new policy will help new dads and parents. “It gives parents a choice to do what fits best for the family. From a work perspective it takes the pressure off by having the flexibility to take the time you need to support your partner in those precious early weeks and months. It can be a big worry coming back to work after a couple of weeks and leaving your partner at home, so having the ability to take more of an equal role also helps from a mental health and wellbeing perspective.” This year Molson Coors was recognised by the Top Employer Institute for the 11th consecutive year. The business also received the MIND Gold Workplace Wellbeing award in 2022 and has partnered with ENEI (Employers Network for Equality & Inclusion), one of the UK’s leading employer networks, D&I in Grocery and WiTHL, which champions diversity and inclusion in the hospitality, retail and leisure sectors, to help drive a more inclusive culture across its business.

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Police and ambulance staff called to ‘disturbance’ at Grangemouth shopping precinct in early hours

The disturbance happened in Bowhouse Road near Bowhouse Square in Grangemouth and calls were made to police. A Police Scotland spokesperson said: “Around 1.30am on Wednesday, March 20, we were called to a report of a disturbance at Bowhouse Road, Grangemouth. Emergency services attended and a woman was checked at the scene by Scottish Ambulance Service. “No criminality was established.”

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Pleasant Sunshine Ahead of Weekend Storm

Following a front that crossed through early Tuesday morning, a pleasant weather pattern has built in for the middle portion of our week across South Florida. Temperatures this morning across most locations have been in the 60s with even some inland locations in the upper 50s! At Miami, this was the coolest morning of the month with a low temperature of 63F despite today being the first full day of spring. Expect high temperatures this Wednesday in the upper 70s to around 80F under mostly sunny skies and with an easterly wind. Temperatures tomorrow will then be fairly similar as today, although lows will be a few degrees milder. Additional clouds are in the forecast for our Thursday along with the chance for some spotty showers. Overall though, the pattern remains quiet. That will dramatically change Friday into Saturday, though, as an area of low pressure develops over the Gulf of Mexico and tracks across northern Florida. That will lead to rounds of heavy rain and thunderstorms and windy conditions during this period. Model guidance remains in good agreement that a widespread 2-3 inches with isolated 4+ inch rainfall totals can be expected with this system. Isolated strong to severe storms will also be possible, including gusty winds and a tornado or two. By Sunday, conditions will improve with drier conditions while temperatures remain milder and near normal around the 80F mark for highs.

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Dear Abby: Some bridesmaids won’t like bawdy bachelorette party

DEAR ABBY: I recently started planning my wedding. Half the friends I want as bridesmaids are very conservative. They think sex is sacred and should be talked about only discreetly, not joked about, mentioned on TV, etc. I used to hold similar views, but I no longer do. Neither do the other half of the girls I want as bridesmaids. My dream bachelorette party is the kind you see in movies, a group of girls going out on the town getting tipsy — maybe being a little stupid. Nothing dangerous, with sexy games/favors and casually swapping sex tips and double entendres. That may not be possible with my straight-laced friends, whom I really like and would like to include. I pick up on others’ feelings easily, so I can’t ignore when someone around me is unhappy. I want all my girlfriends to enjoy the party, but two or three of them won’t appreciate the humor of drinking from a phallus-shaped straw. Should I split the guest list and have one prudish party and one sexy one? — GOOD/BAD GIRL IN THE EAST DEAR GIRL: That’s an excellent idea! And we all know which one you are going to enjoy. DEAR ABBY: I just found out my husband has been texting with his high school sweetheart for the last three years. He contacted her and shares all day-to-day activities, like our vacations, new dog, etc. She lives 2,500 miles away. She’s divorced, retired like us and has children and grandchildren. I snooped and read his email. I can tell by her responses that she is being polite. I don’t understand why he contacted her after so many years and why he shares everything with her, as we have a close relationship and share everything. He did mention a year ago that he was in touch with her. I didn’t think much about it then, but now that I know how long this has been going on, I’m wondering why. Should I be concerned about this? — PUZZLED IN MAINE DEAR PUZZLED: What is happening could be innocent, or it could be crossing a line. You will never know until you discuss this with your husband. You MAY not have to disclose that you read the texts if you say you recalled him mentioning that they were in touch “a while back” and let the conversation evolve from there. DEAR ABBY: I recently received an Evite to a surrogate baby shower. I was happy to attend. Each guest was asked to bring a box of diapers, our favorite children’s book and a donation to help cover the surrogate expenses. A written explanation of how expensive the surrogate process is was also included. In my opinion, when the couple started the surrogacy process, they were aware of how expensive it would be, and to ask the shower attendees to contribute to it is a little nervy. Was this proper etiquette? — WONDERING IN NEVADA DEAR WONDERING: No. Soliciting the donation was over the top. I can’t help but wonder how many invitees declined the invitation because of it. To ask for money was tacky. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. For everything you need to know about wedding planning, order “How to Have a Lovely Wedding.” Send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $8 (U.S. funds), to: Dear Abby, Wedding Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)

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Payout for Teesside surgeon who faced racial discrimination

The sum awarded to Dr Manuf Kassem, an associate specialist surgeon at North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust, included loss of earnings, injury to feelings and general damages and followed a remedy hearing. Dr Kassem, who is originally from Iraq, had expressed concerns in a grievance in June 2017 that he had been bullied and prejudiced against and went on to allege that 25 patients had “suffered complications, negligence, delayed treatment and avoidable deaths”, regarded as a so-called protected disclosure for which he was subject to detriment. The trust reviewed the cases and others highlighted by Dr Kassem and was satisfied that appropriate processes were followed with no failings in care identified. The North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust has hospitals in Stockton and Hartlepool (Image: NHS) He was subsequently removed from an on-call emergency rota with a senior member of staff revealing his identity as a whistleblower, including to other doctors about whom he had raised concerns, breaching his confidentiality. In September 2018 he was made subject to disciplinary proceedings, which prompted an investigation lasting 17 months, following several allegations made against him by colleagues, none of which were formally upheld and which the tribunal panel found to be “not particularly weighty”. Dr Kassem later brought a number of complaints against the hospital trust, triggering an employment tribunal which heard representations from both sides in September 2020 and went on to deliberate over several sittings until January of the following year. Employment judge Trevor Morris criticised the “inordinate amount” of time the trust investigation had taken, describing it as a “breach of good industrial relations practice”. Meanwhile, examples were given in the tribunal’s findings where “the focus of the [investigation] team appears to have been upon identifying evidence that supported the allegations that had been made against the claimant and did not approach its task with an open mind including seeking to identify any potential evidence that might exculpate the claimant”. Judge Morris also said the trust had breached its own policy by not instigating informal discussions first before formal disciplinary action was taken, with Dr Kassem being treated differently from others in this regard, and the investigation amounted to race discrimination. He referred to an “intimidating and hostile environment” for him created by a clinical director and his dignity being violated, while his claim he had been harassed was well-founded. Dr Manuf Kassem pictured in 2017 (Image: NHS) At a surgical morbidity and mortality meeting in which Dr Kassem delivered a presentation, he was said to have been interrupted repeatedly, his actions strongly criticised and at one point told he did not care about his patient and that his performance was substandard. Referring to Dr Kassem’s suspension from the on-call rota, which was deemed necessary to prevent any potential patient safety risks, Judge Morris said the tribunal found this surprising, particularly in view of the fact that there were considered to be no issues with him undertaking private medical work elsewhere, as well as being on registrar rota duty at another NHS trust. Dr Kassem, who it is understood continues to be employed by the trust, had claimed in his evidence to the tribunal that he had been shouted at, insulted and subject to degrading remarks by a senior member of staff, including in a meeting called to discuss a proposed new job plan for him and threatened with the loss of his job if he did not accept. He said the treatment of staff was different “if you are white or from India” and he was “treated less favourably because I am from Iraq”. The surgeon referred to a Turkish surgeon who had received treatment similar to him, a doctor from Pakistan who had put a complaint in about how she had been treated and a colleague from Nigeria who was also shouted at. Dr Kassem, who has been described as “caring”, “kind” and a “gentleman” by former patients and first took up post with the trust in 2002, made further claims of victimisation and an alleged unauthorised deduction of wages – however, these were not upheld. There was said to be no challenge from the tribunal panel to the claimant’s evidence that he had no patient complaints, claims, serious incidents or serious complications reported against him throughout his employment. Recommended reading: County Durham clairvoyant shocked after finding LIVE cockroach in Aldi bananas Progress of County Durham levelling up projects revealed amid concerns over delays North East gastro pub is upper crust in pie awards – winners for sixth year in row Don’t miss out on the latest news and stories. Subscribe to The Northern Echo for just £4 for 4 months. In a statement, a spokesman for the North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust said it had acknowledged the tribunal panel findings and carried out a detailed review of its actions including “lessons learned”. He said: “This included the appointment of a dedicated employee relations investigations team. “The trust also follows the just and restorative culture guidance issued by NHS England which underpins workforce policies. “Several reviews in respect of the clinical case allegations, including a comprehensive external investigation have also been carried out.”

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Japan Tells Its Soccer Fans to Stay Away From World Cup Qualifying Match in North Korea

More Must-Reads From TIME Why We’re Spending So Much Money Now The Fight to Free Evan Gershkovich Meet the 2024 Women of the Year John Kerry’s Next Move The Quiet Work Trees Do for the Planet Breaker Sunny Choi Is Heading to Paris Column: The Internet Made Romantic Betrayal Even More Devastating Want Weekly Recs on What to Watch, Read, and More? Sign Up for Worth Your Time Contact us at letters@time.com

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Eight stunning photographs taken by camera club members

We are inviting talented photography enthusiasts to submit work to be featured in the Clydebank Post, Dumbarton Reporter, Barrhead News, and Renfrewshire Gazette. This week we are featuring wonderful wildlife and stunning scenery. Enjoy! Incredible infrared shot of Dalmuir Park by Dhyani Quinn Crawford (Clydebank Post Camera Club). The sun shining through the trees in Dalmuir Park by Tim Morris (Clydebank Post Camera Club). Amazing snap of a Goldfinch at Balloch Castle by James Duncan (Dumbarton Reporter Camera Club). Sunset over Dumbarton by Mick Finan (Dumbarton Reporter Camera Club). Lovely snap by Anwar Rafiq (Barrhead News Camera Club) (Image: Anwar Rafiq)Lovely snap by Anwar Rafiq (Barrhead News Camera Club). Gorgeous sunset at Rowardennan by John McGinn (Barrhead News Camera Club). Taking flight by Allan Kelly (Renfrewshire Gazette Camera Club). Peace and quiet by Mik Coia (Renfrewshire Gazette Camera Club). To join the Clydebank Post’s camera Club, click here. To join the Dumbarton Reporter’s camera Club, click here. To join the Renfrewshire Gazette’s Camera Club, click here. To join the Barrhead News’ Camera Club, click here.

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Czech government and opposition clash over “pacifist” language on Ukraine

Although Czechia has been one of Ukraine’s strongest supporters since the start of the full-scale Russian invasion, in recent months the opposition has been increasingly vocal regarding the need for peace talks. Growing tension between the ruling parties and opposition leader Andrej Babiš reached a head last week when Foreign Minister Jan Lipavský labelled him “a security threat” and Babiš asked his close associates for a dossier on Lipavský and his family, using extremely vulgar language. He sent the mail to the wrong address and its contents ended up in the media. The ruling parties slammed Babiš for communist-era practices and called a session of the lower house to clarify the country’s security interests. Addressing the house, Prime Minister Petr Fiala argued that helping Ukraine to defend itself against Russia was crucial for the security of Czechia itself, since Putin would not stop at Ukraine’s borders. He said that while the Czech government was doing its best to ensure the country’s safety the opposition was “purposefully undermining the cabinet’s actions” and “gambling” with the country’s fate. While the opposition ANO party has consistently backed all of the government’s initiatives in support of Ukraine – military, financial and humanitarian – its leader has increasingly started talking about the need to support peace negotiations since the military aid was not having the desired effect. He repeatedly criticized the Czech army chief of staff Karel Řehka for speaking about the need to prepare for war and consider administrative conscription. Foreign Minister Lipavský argued that since Moscow equated peace with capitulation the pacifist rhetoric of the opposition was pure populism and presented a big security risk. Interior Minister Vít Rakušan went further, accusing Babiš of using fear marketing to win political support ahead of the European elections and suggesting that Babiš is playing, albeit unwittingly, the role of a Trojan horse in a hybrid war. The accusations were made to a half-empty assembly chamber. Since the floor was reserved almost entirely for coalition MPs, ANO deputies walked out, leaving signs on their desks with inscriptions pointing to the government’s failings and accusing the coalition of trying to cover up its incompetence with the security debate in question. At a press conference outside the assembly hall, Babiš rejected the idea that the party was moving away from Western values and leaning towards Russia. He said he had never questioned the country’s membership in NATO, nor had he suggested that Ukraine should cede territory to Moscow, but argued that without peace talks the bloodshed would never end. Pressed by a TV host to say under what conditions the coalition would support peace talks, Martin Kupka of the Civic Democrats said that “if and when” Ukraine itself asked for a peace conference Czechia would do its best to assist the process. He said that as a state which experienced the Munich Agreements Czechia should be more wary than most of the danger of pushing a country into relinquishing its sovereignty.

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Westwater Resources Announces 2023 Business and Financial Updates

First Contract Executed to Supply Natural Purified Graphite Anode Material to a Leading Manufacturer of EV Batteries Increase in Anticipated Annual Phase I CSPG Production to 12,500 MT While Maintaining Existing Budget Over $119 Million Invested in Kellyton Graphite Plant ConstructionCENTENNIAL, Colo.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Westwater Resources, Inc. (NYSE American: WWR), an energy technology and battery-grade natural graphite development company (“Westwater” or the “Company”), is pleased to announce its results for the year ended December 31, 2023, and to provide business and financial updates. 2023 a Year of Progress During 2023, Westwater achieved critical milestones and achievements related to its planned natural graphite business, notably: In May 2023, Westwater announced the execution of a joint development agreement (“JDA”) with SK On Co, Ltd. (“SK On”). On February 5, 2024, Westwater announced the execution of its first off-take agreement with SK On for Coated Spherical Purified Graphite (“CSPG”). As a result of the completion of a debottlenecking study, Westwater has increased its anticipated Phase I production of CSPG to 12,500 mt per year while maintaining the Phase I construction budget of the Kellyton Graphite Plant at $271 million. Continued Phase I construction at the Kellyton Graphite Plant deploying approximately $119.2 million since inception of the project. In December 2023, Westwater announced the completion of its Initial Assessment with an Economic Analysis related to its Coosa Graphite Deposit, and publication of the S-K 1300 Technical Report Summary (“TRS”) disclosing mineral resources, which indicates an estimated pre-tax NPV of $229 million, estimated pre-tax internal rate of return of 26.7%, and estimated free cash flow of $714 million over the 20+ year mine life. “We believe 2023 was a year of significant progress across our graphite business, which was the result of tremendous hard work by the Westwater team,” said Terence J. Cryan, Westwater’s Executive Chairman. “We are especially excited about our first off-take agreement with a major Tier 1 battery manufacturer, the increase in anticipated Phase I production while staying on budget, and the positive anticipated economic results from our initial assessment of the Coosa Graphite Deposit.” “Westwater is the only U.S.-based natural graphite company under construction on a processing facility, that has a multi-year off-take agreement for CSPG, and that has a graphite deposit in the same state as its future processing plant,” said Frank Bakker, Westwater’s President and CEO. “The accomplishments of the Westwater team were not only significant for 2023, but I believe positions Westwater well for 2024.” Recent Government Regulation of Graphite Products China and the United States have imposed tariffs and export controls on critical minerals, including graphite, indicating the potential for further trade barriers between China and the U.S. Effective December 1, 2023, China began requiring government approval for exports of two types of graphite products, including high-purity, high-hardness and high-intensity synthetic graphite material and natural flake graphite and its products. Westwater believes these export restrictions continue to highlight the supply-chain risk for the U.S. and other countries related to natural graphite products. The U.S. Department of the Treasury (the “Treasury Department”) has published guidance on key requirements for federal clean vehicle tax credits established by the Inflation Reduction Act (“IRA”); most significantly, the Treasury Department proposed new regulations to clarify the application of Foreign Entity of Concern (“FEOC”) credit eligibility exclusions. The U.S. Department of Energy simultaneously released companion interpretive regulations regarding the scope and application of FEOC-related restrictions. Most importantly, both sets of guidance identified the People’s Republic of China as an FEOC. These regulations are important because, starting in 2025, any vehicle whose batteries contain critical minerals – including graphite – that were extracted or processed in any way, and to any degree, by an FEOC – including China – will be ruled ineligible for the Clean Vehicle Tax credit of $7,500 under section 30D of the Internal Revenue Code. As a result, an FEOC must be excluded from a vehicle battery’s supply chain in order for the vehicle to be eligible for the tax credit. Because Westwater is not an FEOC and intends to produce battery-grade graphite for lithium-ion batteries to be used in electric vehicles in the United States, management believes its future production of battery-graphite products will meet the domestic content requirements of the IRA, which we anticipate will provide indirect future benefit to the Company. Continuing Customer Engagement As previously announced, Westwater executed its first off-take agreement for the supply of CSPG from its Kellyton Graphite Plant to SK On battery plants located within the U.S., with forecasted volumes ramping to 10,000 mt in the final year of the agreement. Additionally, Westwater continues to engage with other potential customers by providing samples of CSPG produced by the Company for testing and evaluation, hosting site visits at its Kellyton Graphite Plant, and having technical product development and commercial discussions. “Customer interest and market demand for domestic CSPG remains strong, and customer interest in Westwater is due to the combination of our SK On off-take agreement, FEOC-related guidance requiring EV tax credit eligible vehicles to use of IRA-compliant graphite by 2025, and new Chinese export restrictions on graphite that have reduced stability of supply,” said Jon Jacobs, Westwater’s Chief Commercial Officer. “We believe customer interest is accelerating in Westwater as a stable, U.S.-based supplier of natural graphite.” Construction Financing Update Westwater continues its efforts to secure debt financing to fund the balance of the estimated capital requirements for completion of construction of Phase I of the Kellyton Graphite Plant. “We are continuing to engage with third parties interested in funding our project, and those parties have indicated they are pleased to see we have our first off-take agreement in place,” said Steve Cates, Westwater’s Chief Financial Officer and SVP – Finance. “With positive interest from additional customers and lenders, Westwater remains focused on executing additional off-take sales agreements and completing the project debt financing necessary to complete Phase I at the Kellyton Graphite Plant.” As of December 31, 2023, Westwater had a cash balance of $10.9 million and has incurred approximately $119.2 million, inclusive of liabilities, since beginning construction of Phase I of the Kellyton Graphite Plant. Financial Summary for The Year Ended December 31, 2023 ($ in thousands, Except Share and Per Share Amounts) 2023 2022 Variance Net Cash Used in Operations $(11,430) $(13,176) (13%) Net Cash Used in Investing Activities $(58,295) $(52,790) 10% Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities $5,381 $25,869 (79%) Product Development Expenses $(2,935) $(1,145) 156% General and Administrative Expenses $(9,780) $(9,902) (1%) Net Loss $(7,751) $(11,121) (30%) Net Loss Per Share $(0.15) $(0.25) (40%) Avg. Weighted Shares Outstanding 52,037,463 44,909,500 16% Net cash used in operations decreased $1.7 million in 2023 compared to 2022 primarily due to receiving $3.1 million of cash in the fourth quarter related to the settlement of the Company’s arbitration against the Republic of Turkey; partially offset by $1.8 million higher product development expenses during 2023 as discussed below. Net cash used in investing activities increased $5.5 million during 2023 compared to 2022. The increase in investing cash outflows is due to continued construction of Phase I of the Kellyton Graphite Plant. Net cash provided by financing activities decreased $20.5 million during 2023, compared to 2022, due to lower sales of shares under our equity financing facilities. Product development expenses for 2023 increased by $1.8 million compared to 2022 primarily due to continued product development, product optimization, and additional sample production for customer evaluation. General and administrative expenses decreased $0.1 million during 2023 compared to 2022, due to a reduction in personnel and overhead costs related to stock award forfeitures and lower hiring fees and relocations costs; offset partially by severance charges related to executive management changes announced in the first quarter of 2023. Consolidated net loss was $7.8 million, or $0.15 per share, for 2023 compared to a consolidated net loss of $11.1 million, or $0.25 per share, in 2022. The decrease in the Company’s net loss from continuing operations was due primarily to the $3.1 million cash settlement from the Republic of Turkey, a $1.2 million write-off of accrued uranium royalties, a $0.3 million increase in interest income on our investment account, and $0.5 million less exploration expenses; offset partially by $1.8 million higher product development expenses associated with additional sample production. Cash and working capital as of December 31, 2023, were $10.9 million and $3.8 million, respectively, compared to $75.2 million and $51.0 million as of December 31, 2022. The decrease in cash was primarily due to capital expenditures of $58.3 million and cash used in operations of $11.4 million; partially offset by cash provided from financing activities. The decrease in working capital was primarily due to the net cash spend during 2023; partially offset by the lower current liabilities related to Phase I construction costs as of December 31, 2023, compared to December 31, 2022. Conference Call Management will host a conference call to provide a business update to investors on March 20, 2024, at 11:00 AM EDT. Live Conference Call 1-800-319-4610 (USA and Canada) 1-604-638-5340 (International) Conference ID: Westwater Resources Conference Call Webcast: westwaterresources.net/investors/presentations-events/ Conference Call Replay 1-855-669-9658 (USA and Canada) 1-412-317-0088 (International) Access Code: 0646 Going Concern Audit Opinion Pursuant to Section 610(b) of the NYSE American Company Guide, the Company notes that the audit opinion provided by the Company’s independent public accounting firm relating to the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2023, included a going concern qualification. The financial statements with that opinion were included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2023, which was filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 19, 2024. About Westwater Resources, Inc. Westwater Resources, Inc. (NYSE American: WWR), an energy technology company, is focused on developing battery-grade natural graphite. The Company’s primary project is the Kellyton Graphite Plant that is under construction in east-central Alabama. In addition, the Company’s Coosa Graphite Deposit is the most advanced natural flake graphite deposit in the contiguous United States and located across 41,965 acres (~17,000 hectares) in Coosa County, Alabama. For more information, visit www.westwaterresources.net. Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements This news release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions and are identified by words such as “expects,” “estimates,” “planned,” “intends,” “projects,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “could,” “scheduled,” “targets” and other similar words. Forward-looking statements include, among other things, statements concerning: the off-take agreement with SK On; Westwater’s future sales of CSPG products to SK On, including the amounts, timing, and types of products included within those sales; possible off-take agreements with other customers; potential debt financing arrangements; the anticipated annual production from Phase I of Kellyton Graphite Plan; the positive anticipated economic results from the Initial Assessment with Economic Analysis related to its Coosa Graphite Deposit; and the construction and operation of the Kellyton Graphite Plant, the Company’s Coosa Graphite Deposit and its PEA, and the costs, schedules, production and economic projections associated with them. The Company cautions that there are factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking information that has been provided. The reader is cautioned not to put undue reliance on this forward-looking information, which is not a guarantee of future performance and is subject to a number of uncertainties and other factors, many of which are outside the control of the Company; accordingly, there can be no assurance that such suggested results will be realized. The following factors, in addition to those discussed in Westwater’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2023, and subsequent securities filings, could cause actual results to differ materially from management expectations as suggested by such forward-looking information: (a) the spot price and long‑term contract price of graphite (both flake graphite feedstock and purified graphite products) and vanadium, and the world-wide supply and demand of graphite and vanadium; (b) the effects, extent and timing of the entry additional competition in the markets in which we operate; (c) our ability to obtain contracts or other agreements with customers; (d) available sources and transportation of graphite feedstock; (e) the ability to control costs and avoid cost and schedule overruns during the development, construction and operation of the Kellyton Graphite Plant; (f) the ability to construct and operate the Kellyton Graphite Plant in accordance with the requirements of permits and licenses and the requirements of tax credits and other incentives; (g) effects of inflation, including labor shortages and supply chain disruptions; (h) rising interest rates and the associated impact on the availability and cost of financing sources; (i) the availability and supply of equipment and materials needed to construct the Kellyton Graphite Plant; (j) stock price volatility; (k) government regulation of the mining and manufacturing industries in the United States; (l) unanticipated geological, processing, regulatory and legal or other problems we may encounter; (m) the results of our exploration activities at the Coosa Graphite Deposit, and the possibility that future exploration results may be materially less promising than initial exploration results; (n) any graphite or vanadium discoveries at the Coosa Graphite Deposit not being in high enough concentration to make it economic to extract the minerals; (o) our ability to finance growth plans; (p) our ability to obtain and maintain rights of ownership or access to our mining properties; (q) currently pending or new litigation or arbitration; (r) our ability to maintain and timely receive mining, manufacturing, and other permits from regulatory agencies; and (s) other factors which are more fully described in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, and other filings with the SEC. Contacts Westwater Resources, Inc.Email: Info@WestwaterResources.net Investor RelationsEmail: Investorrelations@westwaterresources.net Source link The content is by Business Wire. Headlines of Today Media is not responsible for the content provided or any links related to this content. Headlines of Today Media is not responsible for the correctness, topicality or the quality of the content.

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Lakers' Christian Wood Undergoes Arthroscopic Knee Surgery, Out For Rest Of Season

Lakers big man, Christian Wood, who has been out since February 14, has been ruled out for at least, the rest of the regular season, following an arthroscopic surgery on his left knee Tuesday in the latest injury setback for Los Angeles’ depth players. The Lakers provided no time frame for Wood’s recovery from the procedure, which was performed at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. But the injury seems highly likely to sideline Wood, who has been out since February 14, for at least the rest of the regular season, according to AP reports. The Lakers (37-32) are also playing without veterans Jarred Vanderbilt, Gabe Vincent and Cam Reddish, eroding the depth of what once looked like a solid supporting cast around LeBron James and Anthony Davis. Vanderbilt has been out with a sprained right foot since Feb. 1, while Vincent injured his knee in October after playing in only five games in his first season with the Lakers. The team hasn’t predicted when either veteran will be able to play again, likely a bad sign for their prospects. Reddish has been out since March 8 with an ankle injury, but the Lakers expect the defense-minded wingman to return soon. Wood is averaging 6.9 points and 5.1 rebounds in 50 games this season, his first with the Lakers. Jaxson Hayes has stepped up with solid play as Los Angeles’ backup center in Wood’s absence. The Lakers have still won 13 of 20 despite their injury problems, staying in ninth place in the Western Conference playoff race with a blowout win over Atlanta on Monday. James is averaging 25.4 points, 8.1 assists and 7.2 rebounds during an unprecedentedly strong 21st NBA season, while D’Angelo Russell has continued his streak of superb outside shooting since midseason.

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