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Red Pheasant Cree Nation man headed to court for attempted murder

A 42-year-old man from Red Pheasant Cree Nation will be in North Battleford Provincial Court tomorrow after being charged with attempted murder. According to RCMP, Travis Wuttunee attacked a man on the First Nation and was arrested by police shortly after. RCMP say he gave the officers a false name. Wuttunee was charged with attempted murder. He is also facing charges of aggravated assault, possession of a firearm and resisting a police officer. He will appear in North Battleford Provincial Court Tuesday.

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Congolese journalist to be freed after six months in prison

GOMA, Congo (AP) — Congolese journalist Stanis Bujakera was set to be freed soon after a court sentenced him Monday to six months in prison for spreading false information among other charges, according to media freedom group Reporters Without Borders. He was expected to be released hours or days after the verdict, having already served more than six months while waiting for trial. A court in Kinshasa also fined him 1 million Congolese francs ($360.) Bujakera worked for Actualité.CD, a Congolese online news site, and Jeune Afrique, a Paris-based magazine, among others. Bujakera, who has denied all charges, had faced up to 20 years in prison. He was accused of fabricating a memo that implicated a Congolese intelligence official in the murder of an opposition spokesman. “He should never have been arrested, prosecuted, imprisoned and convicted on the basis of a case that was clearly fabricated against him,” Reporters without Borders said in a statement. Actualité.CD said in a statement that it stood behind Bujakera’s reporting and called on his lawyers to appeal the guilty verdict. Bujakera’s imprisonment drew widespread condemnation from international rights organizations. ____ Follow AP’s Africa coverage at: https://apnews.com/hub/africa The Associated Press

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Melrose fire chief on leave amid investigation into alleged policy violation

MELROSE, MASS. (WHDH) – Melrose Fire Chief Ed Collina has been placed on leave pending the outcome of an investigation into an alleged violation of a city policy. Collina was placed on leave March 15, according to the City of Melrose. The city declined to provide further details because the situation is an “ongoing personnel matter.” This is a developing news story; stay with 7NEWS on-air and online for the latest details. (Copyright (c) 2024 Sunbeam Television. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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Sowore Deletes Fake Okuama Reprisal Attack Video, Apologises To Army

Activist and former presidential candidate of the African Action Congress (AAC), Omoyele Sowore, has apologised to the Nigerian Army (NA) for posting a video purportedly showing Okuama community in Ughelli South local government area of Delta State under military attack following the killing of 16 Army personnel of the 181 Amphibious Battalion in the State last Thursday. The viral videos show some houses on fire and was allegedly blamed on the Army as a reprisal attack on the community where the Commanding Officer of the Army Battalion, three other senior officers and 12 soldiers were ambushed and killed by suspected youths of the community. But, Sowore, who just returned to his family in the United States of America last week after about five years of being on trial in Nigeria for alleged terrorism, said he had discovered that the video was false as it depicts a different event that happened in the neighbouring Bayelsa State and not Delta State. Taking to his X handle (formerly Twitter) on Monday night, Sowore, who said he had since deleted the misleading videos, however, insisted that the Nigerian Army desist from further reprisal attacks against innocent civilians in Okuama and any other settlement in the Niger Delta region even as he called for impartial investigation into the killing of the Army personnel said to be on a mediatory and peace mission in the Okuama community. Sowore wrote: “I deleted my earlier videos that showed a burning village in the Niger Delta region that was purportedly from reprisal attacks against Okuama community by the Nigerian Army @HQNigeriaArmy upon new evidence that this was from an old different incident in Nembe, Bayelsa state. “I apologise for the wrong video. However, I insist that the Nigerian Army @HQNigeriaArmy desist from further reprisal attacks against innocent civilians in Okuama and any other settlement in the Niger Delta region, I call for an impartial investigation to unravel the real culprits involved in killing of Nigerian soldiers in Okuama. The Nigerian Armed forces must refrain from further reprisal attacks againt villages in the area. #RevolutionNow.” LEADERSHIP reports that Okuama community is said to be involved in a communal clash with neighbouring Okoloba community of Bomadi local government area of the State. The Defence Headquarters (DHQ), on Monday, gave the names of the slain Army officers and soldiers as Lt. Col. AH Ali (Commanding Officer, 181 Amphibious Battalion); Major SD Shafa; Major DE Obi; Capt. U Zakari, and Sgt. Yahaya Saidu. Others included Cpl Yahaya Danbaba; Cpl Kabir Bashir; LCpl Bulus Haruna; LCpl Sole Opeyemi; LCpl Bello Anas; LCpl Hamman Peter; LCpl Ibrahim Abdullahi; Pte Alhaji Isah; Pte Clement Francis; Pte Abubakar Ali; Pte Ibrahim Adamu, and Pte Adamu Ibrahim.

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PICTURES: Exquisite 17th century Limerick house with unique history for sale for €539k

Courtesy of Daft.ie USE ARROWS OR NEXT BUTTON TO SEE MORE PICTURES A unique and historic 17th century property on the edge of Ballingarry Village, Co Limerick, goes on sale for €539,000. The Turret enjoys an elevated and private setting on 2.3 acres and is within walking distance to the village of Ballingarry. Access to the main N21 national route is just a short drive (10 mins) connecting you to the heritage village of Adare and Limerick. The Turret got its name from having been incorporated on to the turret of a building which had been built by the order of the Knights Hospitallers. This substantial 17th century residence has been carefully restored in the late 19th century and offers 3,500 sq ft / 325 sqm of elegant and spacious accommodation over five levels. The well appointed accommodation comprises reception rooms, formal and relaxing living spaces, 4 double bedrooms and 2-bathrooms. USE ARROWS OR NEXT BUTTON TO SEE MORE PICTURES USE ARROWS OR NEXT BUTTON TO SEE MORE PICTURES

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Lang Park will be the centrepiece of the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games, along with changes to other venues

A review of Brisbane’s 2032 Olympics and Paralympics venues has recommended ensuring the Games leave a legacy in the city. Former Brisbane lord mayor Graham Quirk, who led the review, recommended a new stadium be built in inner-city Victoria Park and the Gabba Stadium redevelopment be scrapped. The Queensland government agreed with “most of it” and accepted 27 of the 30 recommendations. So, will Brisbane have a new stadium for the Olympic and Paralympic Games? The government has “ruled out” the review’s recommendation to build a new stadium at Victoria Park in Brisbane. Mr Miles said it was rejected because it is a more expensive option. Brisbane architect Peter Edwards said he is “mystified about why that seems to be so politically fraught”. “We have to have a low-cost Games in 2032, which is our once-ever moment to present ourselves on the global stage,” he said. What will happen to Brisbane’s Gabba stadium? Mr Miles said the “iconic Gabba will always be a stadium”, but the rebuild will not proceed. He said too much has been invested in building public transport around the stadium. He said the stadium will undergo a “refurbishment” ahead of the Games, in consultation with stakeholders. AFL and Cricket Australia will no longer be displaced from the Gabba, and East Brisbane State School will not need to vacate its current site by the end of 2025. The stadium will also no longer host the opening and closing ceremonies. What about Lang Park? Brisbane’s Lang Park is already the “spirit of rugby league” and now will be the “Olympic stadium”. Loading… Mr Miles said the stadium will host the opening and closing ceremonies for the 2032 Games. Alan Graham, general manager of Suncorp Stadium, said the stadium was looking forward to participating in the “wonderful Games” by improving the technology, adding large LED screens, additional seating, and better access. Where will the athletic events be held? Queensland Sport and Athletics Complex (QSAC) is set to be upgraded to hold athletic events, despite the review rejecting the option. Mr Miles said it was ruled out by the review due to Olympic access costs, but the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has committed to him that it will “work to minimise those requirements”. How much will it cost? The government said the “new direction” for the Games ensures costs “remain within the agreed funding envelope of $7.1 billion, to be shared between the state and commonwealth governments”. The cost of upgrading QSAC, and how long it will take, is yet to be determined. Mr Miles said that if the upgrades cost $1 billion, it would still leave “in the order of a billion dollars” to be splurged, “roughly half-half” between upgrading Lang Park and the Gabba. What about the other Olympic venues? State Development Minister Grace Grace said the government supports the recommendation to build the Brisbane Arena in the new location at the upper end of Roma Street Parklands. Moreton Bay Indoor Sport Centre will proceed, with the site’s expansion being investigated. Toowoomba Sports Ground will not proceed, as recommended, but the government will explore opportunities to host other events in the region. Albion’s Breakfast Creek Indoor Sports Precinct will also not proceed, with a centre in Zillmere or Boondall to be considered instead. What about the athlete villages? The locations of the athlete villages were not part of the review. Mr Miles said villages will remain at Hamilton in Brisbane, on the Gold Coast, and on the Sunshine Coast. Now the review is done, what’s next? Ms Grace said the government will now “move quickly”. An independent delivery authority will oversee the sports venue program, which is set to be established by mid-2024. Will Brisbane be ready in time for the 2032 Olympic Games? Griffith University Cities Research Institute director Professor Paul Burton said the longer debates and discussions continue, the probability of projects being rushed, unfinished, and expensive increases. “Delays often come during the development phase, not the construction phase,” he said.

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Queensland government rejects Victoria Park Olympic stadium proposal and will instead upgrade Lang Park

The Queensland government has rejected an independent Olympic infrastructure review’s call to build a new multi-billion-dollar stadium in Brisbane’s Victoria Park. Premier Steven Miles appointed former lord mayor Graham Quirk to spearhead the 60-day review in January amid concerns about the cost of some venues, including the $2.7 billion Gabba rebuild. The review — released on Monday — has recommended replacing the Gabba rebuild plan, which is likely to cost $3 billion, with a new “greenfield” stadium at Victoria Park at a “marginally” higher cost of up to $3.4 billion. But following a cabinet meeting on Monday, Premier Steven Miles said the government would not be accepting the Victoria Park stadium suggestion. “I ordered this review because I’d heard from Queenslanders that $2.7 billion at the Gabba was too much, so I know that for Queenslanders $3.4 billion at Victoria Park will be too much, so I’m ruling that out.” Instead the government will look at upgrading Lang Park to host the opening and closing ceremonies, and the Queensland Sport and Athletics Centre (QSAC) to host the athletics. This is despite the independent review recommending QSAC not be used as a 2032 Games venue to host track and field events. The Gabba also won’t be demolished and rebuilt, rather it will undergo a “more modest enhancement”. The government has also confirmed AFL and cricket won’t be displaced, and East Brisbane State School won’t need to leave its current site by the end of 2025. The three stadium upgrades will stay within the existing funding “envelope”. Plan in the works for weeks Mr Miles said the government has accepted 27 of the report’s 30 recommendations. These include changing the location for the Brisbane Arena from the Roma Street over-rail site, to the car park and maintenance depot development site, north of the Roma Street Parklands. Mr Miles acknowledged the review had rejected the QSAC option “on the basis of Olympic access costs”. “The IOC has committed to me that they’ll work with us to minimise those requirements, we’ll work with Brisbane City Council to identify public transport options,” he said. “QSAC is already one of our most used venues but we’ll turn it into the best athletics venue in Australia.” He said the government had been working on this plan in recent weeks. “When it was clear the direction the panel was heading in, I indicated to our public servants that we needed another option,” he said. He insisted it was a “great-value games,” while Deputy Premier Cameron Dick said the decision gave the state “maximum bang for buck”. ‘We have to end the madness’ The state opposition said it didn’t support any proposals and instead wanted an independent body to review and make a call on the Olympic venues. In a statement, federal Greens MP for Brisbane Stephen Bates welcomed the premier’s announcement. “It’s good to see the premier responding so quickly to public pressure and rejecting this expensive and destructive plan,” he said. “The biggest question left after this report is why we didn’t ask whether our existing facilities were appropriate for the Games before we made the bid.” Appearing on ABC News Channel following the government’s decision, Mr Quirk was asked how he felt about the review’s stadium recommendation being disregarded. “We’ve provided recommendations to the government, but of course it is up to the government to make its own determination as to what it does,” he replied. He said the panel’s whole operation was about “looking at legacy”. “We have not recommended anything that is just for an Olympic and Paralympic Games,” he said. “Everything that we’ve recommended is something that is needed by Brisbane, the region, and the Queensland community into the future.” When asked if he believed the government’s decision was a “mistake,” he replied it was not for him to comment on that, saying the panel had done a report and presented it to the government in good faith. Proposal for ‘a world class stadium’ During the 60-day review, Mr Quirk and two co-panellists were tasked with assessing the suitability of current venue projects being affordable and fit-for-purpose and creating a substantial legacy with benefits for communities. Their report said Brisbane needed “a world class stadium and arena”. It recommended building a “greenfield” stadium at Victoria Park – with up to 55,000 seats – at a likely cost of between $3 billion and $3.4 billion. “It provides an opportunity to deliver the best outcome and overcomes many of the shortcomings faced at the Gabba due to space restrictions,” the report said. About 12 to 13 per cent of the park would be used by the stadium footprint, with Mr Quirk recommending it be built on an area of land that’s “already disturbed,” around the car park area. “You can do a top level, tier 1 stadium, that will serve the city and the region for a long time to come,” he said. He also said Victoria Park would need to have some “offsetting green space” — a requirement of council. The review said the full rebuild of the Gabba would likely cost around $3 billion, plus $185-$360 million in displacement costs for AFL and cricket, but would not deliver “to the full brief of an international standard stadium”. Gabba an ‘aging asset’ It said public perception of the Gabba was “very different” to the reality of its current condition, with the review finding it was an “aging asset,” no longer fit-for-purpose, and not compliant with current disability discrimination act requirements or modern building codes. An ambulance is unable to enter the field of play because the structure is too low for the height of ambulances, there are no female change or WC areas in the current stadium, and AFL player facilities for visiting teams are “appalling”. On Monday morning, Mr Quirk told ABC Brisbane that the Gabba could never be a top tier international stadium. “If a full Gabba rebuild was to occur, you still don’t end up with a top-level tier one stadium because of the fact that it’s very limited by space, and for that reason, that’s where we landed on Victoria Park,” he said. “This is about building what is needed, and a legacy for the people of Queensland.” Loading… But Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate hit out at the report, claiming it was “Brisbane-centric”. “Let the discussion happen at the Olympic board level.” Recently re-elected Brisbane Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner said he would be briefed later on Monday on the review’s findings, so did not have any comment yet. “However, our team remains fully committed to our long-term position of no net loss of parkland in Brisbane,” he said in a statement.

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Democrats mustn’t be allowed to bankrupt Trump before he even gets to appeal $454M judgment

Democrats have resorted to astonishingly sleazy tricks to stop voters from backing Donald Trump, yet perhaps none as sleazy as their bid to have a court artificially bankrupt him — even before he has a chance to appeal. Trump’s lawyers said Monday the ex-prez has been unable to get a bond to satisfy a $454 million judgment against him in state Attorney General Letitia James’ civil-fraud case. Which was James’ real goal, in hopes that impoverishing him will make it hard, if not impossible, to run an effective campaign for president. Unless Trump comes with a bond (or cash) by next week, James can start seizing his properties. His only way to avoid that: a fire sale of those same properties. It’s outrageous. How would he get them back if his appeal succeeds? Either way, his losses would be enormous. And enormously unfair. The penalty itself, nearly half a billion bucks, was beyond absurd. And patently biased. No one — not a single person — was harmed by Trump’s supposed wrongdoings in this case; even the judge admits that. Banks that Trump supposedly defrauded themselves don’t think he did; not one lost a penny. Yes, the court found he exaggerated the value of his properties. But that’s standard practice in the big-time real-estate banking world, which is why lenders don’t rely borrowers’ estimates. Yet not only did Justice Arthur Engoron find Trump guilty, he hit him with $355 million in penalties, plus interest. And obviously fearing the fine would be tossed on appeal, Engoron ruled that Trump must raise the dough immediately, in order to even be able to appeal the trial-court decision. (An appellate judge declined to block that “post the money now” ruling, though a higher court is now reviewing it.) How is possible — in America in 2024 — that a man could be stripped of hundreds of millions in assets even before he has a chance to appeal? It’s simply unthinkable. And is there any doubt there’d be no case against Trump if he weren’t running for prez? You don’t need to be a Trump-lover to see how Democrats, with media support, have resorted to every low-down trick in the book to keep voters from electing him — from RussiaGate to squashing The Post’s 100% accurate reporting about Hunter Biden’s laptop. Over the past year, they’ve indicted him in four separate cases on 91 charges. Now James and her pals aim to strip him of his assets, based on the most ludicrous charge. Other cases against Trump have enraged the public — only to see voters rally behind him. Expect the same result now.

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ASIRT finds Edmonton police shooting during fight near Oilers watch party was justified

Alberta’s police watchdog has found officers reacted appropriately when responding to a fight and stabbing near an Edmonton Oilers watch party last spring in the city’s downtown core. It happened on Saturday, April 29, 2023, just as the Oilers had won Game 6 of their series against the L.A. Kings and advanced to the second round of the NHL playoffs. Thousands of people were gathered in the Ice District to attend watch the away game on big screens and party. Extra law enforcement were on hand for the events, including the two partnered Edmonton Police Service officers involved in the shooting. The officers who were performing crowd control responded to a weapons complaint near 101 Street and 103A Avenue after it was reported to them that multiple people had been stabbed. The man who reportedly had the knife and his girlfriend had attended the watch party in the Ice District, the Alberta Serious Incident Response Team said. “Prior to their attendance (the man) consumed about 13 ounces of vodka and both he and (his girlfriend) consumed some cocaine. Once at the watch party, both consumed alcoholic beverages,” ASIRT said. ASIRT said at about 9:15 p.m., the couple was walking on 101st Street, crossing at the intersection of 103A Avenue. “While crossing the intersection words were exchanged with another group of adults,” the report stated. A fight broke out between the group, in which the man was involved. Due to the large number of people in the area, there were numerous witnesses, some of whom ASIRT said began calling out for police assistance. “The ASIRT investigation disclosed that there was a fight between these two groups of adults and stab wounds were inflicted. Further details about the fight are on the ASIRT file but it is important to note that the (man) is charged with offences relating to this incident which are still before the Court. Given the importance of the presumption of innocence, and that (the officers) were clearly lawfully placed in responding to a public act of violence involving the presence of a knife, further details regarding the fight are not germane to ASIRT’s mandate,” the agency noted. The two officers were standing on the west side of 101st Street when someone in the crowd told them there was a fight ongoing across the street. As the police officers crossed the road, the ASIRT report on the incident said one of the officers heard someone yell “he has a knife.” One of the officers saw the man holding a knife above a person’s head with the blade pointed down. Both police officers yelled at him to drop the knife twice, but ASIRT said the man did not, and instead moved towards the EPS duo. More orders for the man to drop the blade were not obeyed so the officers fired their guns, hitting the man in the abdomen and left arm. A knife was located on scene, police said at the time, adding a woman was critically injured during the alleged stabbings and a man less seriously so. ASIRT said the man, along with two participants in the fight, were taken to hospital. One was treated and able to leave fairly quickly. Another person involved in the fight and the man both required surgery and both spent several days in hospital, the agency said. ASIRT found the force used was necessary and reasonable in all the circumstances, proportionate to the threat of death or grievous bodily harm that the suspect posed to both officers. Jordan Reilly Fouquette, 20, was charged with two counts of aggravated assault and possession of a weapon dangerous to the public. As noted above, his case is still before the courts. ASIRT is tasked with looking into incidents where people are seriously injured or killed in interactions with police across Alberta, as well as allegations of police misconduct.

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Florida is seeing an increase in homelessness. A Republican bill could make it worse

When Diana Stanley and her team at The Lord’s Place, one of Palm Beach county’s largest and longest-established homelessness charities, opened a new engagement center last year, she figured a few dozen people would show up in search of help. Now, almost 200 people a day are relying on the facility just for lunch. Staff are overwhelmed by the demand for residential accommodation from families, veterans and the elderly in particular. “There’s no question there’s an increase in homelessness,” Stanley, the organization’s chief executive, said, her anecdotal evidence supporting a federal study published in December reflecting a 12% rise in just one year of people lacking permanent sheltered accommodation nationally. “We’re seeing more and more families experiencing homelessness for the first time. And I would be remiss if I didn’t talk about the older adults, later in life, losing housing due to affordability, and being homeless at an age of 60 plus. It’s not a good situation right now.” And things could be about to get much worse, Stanley and numerous other advocates for the unhoused warn. That variable relies on Florida’s Republican governor, Ron DeSantis, signing an “inhumane” bill currently on his desk that seeks to sweep the state’s sizable unhoused community from public view. The new law will require counties and municipalities without sufficient existing capacity to establish homeless camps, with state oversight, far away from more prominent facilities such as parks and waterfront spaces, and impose penalties if they allow or authorize rough sleeping outside of them. Equally concerning to critics is that there is no mention of increased funding for substance abuse and mental health treatment promised by DeSantis when he promoted legislative proposals to “combat homelessness” in a February press release. It has fueled suspicion that the true intent of the law is to hide the problem rather than try to tackle it. “True to form, DeSantis didn’t offer a palette of humane solutions,” the veteran social justice advocate Barrington Salmon wrote in an opinion essay for the Florida Bulldog. “He spoke of the issue in stark, unsympathetic terms characterizing homelessness in purely negative terms, blaming them for contributing to the erosion of the quality of life of others lucky to not be sleeping on the street.” Stanley, whose organization housed more than 430 individuals and families in residential homes and shelters last year, and offered support and resources to hundreds more, concurs. “We should be coming together to come up with solutions, not taking punitive approaches,” she said. “It’s really disheartening for someone like myself, who’s given over 40 years to serving the poor and the homeless, and it’s a statement that we’ve stopped caring about our brothers and sisters: ‘If we can’t see them then we don’t have to help them’.” Stanley says the “vagueness” of the law is another clue to its purpose. The bill’s wording insists it “fulfills an important state interest of ensuring the health, safety, welfare, quality of life, and aesthetics of Florida communities”, and makes “adequate provision for the homeless population of the state”. Notably, it places the financial and logistical burden of setting up accommodation solely on municipalities and counties. It also offers few specifics other than the camps can operate for only up to a year, must have restrooms and running water, and cannot depress surrounding property values. “There are too many uncertainties, too many gray areas, and it does absolutely nothing to address the root cause of homelessness, the lack of affordable housing,” said Stanley, who fears it will create further pressure on already limited shelter accommodation. “When Covid happened money came down from the feds and the state to help with rental assistance, but that drying up, coupled with a lack of affordable housing, is going to equal homelessness. “No family decides on a Friday night, ‘You know what? We’re just going to go out and camp out on the street,’ so it’s hard not to see this bill as a direct attack on those experiencing homelessness.” One of its Republican sponsors, state senator Jonathan Martin, insisted it was a safety issue, and that his bill was sympathetic to unhoused persons. “Insufficient shelter beds and insufficient permanent housing solutions result in unsheltered sleeping and camping in public places, places that we want our kids and grandkids to enjoy, like the parks,” he told a Florida Senate hearing earlier this month. “This bill is a compassionate response to the shortage of shelters and supportive housing by providing an alternative to sleeping in the streets.” Martin also said Florida’s 2024 state budget included $30m in new grants for local municipalities to provide mental health and substance abuse services, and short and longer-term shelters. Other experts see the bill as a criminalization of homelessness, and taking away funds that are sorely needed to address such services. “It’s telling jurisdictions they’re going to have to build these encampments, they’ll have to provide security facilities, wraparound services, the encampments can’t impact property values, so I’m not sure where they’re going to be,” said Amy Donley, professor of sociology at the University of Central Florida, and co-author of the book Poor and Homeless in the Sunshine State. “But all of it, if jurisdictions want to comply with the law, requires funds to be put there, and those funds right now are already being taxed with the increase in people experiencing homelessness, many of them for the first time.” Donley also points to places where sanctioned encampments have failed, such as Dignity Village, a city-operated tented camp in Gainesville that was originally intended to accommodate more than 350 unhoused persons, but was closed and dismantled in 2020 amid growing problems with violence, theft and drugs. “Having jurisdictions focus on building these encampments instead of increasing housing demonstrates a lack of understanding of the problem,” she said. “I work with a shelter with families qualified for rapid rehousing, but there’s just nothing available. If they could move into affordable housing, that would free up room for people currently on the street. So that’s where the focus should be, helping people into housing, not encampments.”

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