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Conor Bradley sums up his last few months at Liverpool with just one word

“Mental”. That’s how Conor Bradley reflects on the last three months when his Liverpool career has gone supersonic. Bradley got his chance when Trent Alexander-Arnold injured his knee at Arsenal in early January and has featured in every game since when he has been available. He bagged his opening goal against Chelsea, and two assists, and got his first winner’s medal last month when he played a key role in the Carabao Cup Final. Not a bad start for the kid who grew up in County Tyrone in Northern Ireland, dreaming of playing for his beloved Reds. “It’s been mental,” he said. “I remember sitting on the bench at Arsenal, just dying to get on. “They moved Trent into midfield and I came on at right-back. I was up against Gabriel Martinelli and it was a big test, but I did OK and it’s just kicked on from there. “It’s been brilliant. All my dreams have come true in the last few months. “I’d love to get my first goal for Northern Ireland, that would be a dream come true. “But quite a few of my big dreams have been realised, especially scoring for Liverpool, getting my first assist and winning at Wembley was brilliant too.” The Kop have taken Bradley to their hearts after he became the first Northern Ireland player to score for Liverpool since Sammy Smyth in 1954. “I definitely didn’t think it would go this well,” he said. “You dream about scoring your first goal for Liverpool, but never think it will come true. “My pinch-myself moment was probably against Chelsea when I scored and had two assists and the fans chanting my name was pretty special. “I don’t think I’ll have a better night than that to be honest.” Bradley, 20, is incredibly grounded in the face of such a whirlwind of success and says his Northern Ireland team-mates still treat him the same. He is back with them after missing the last three squads with a stress fracture of his back and will add to his 13 caps in Friday’s friendly against Romania and Tuesday’s clash with Scotland at Hampden Park. “All the lads still treat me the same, they still slag me off!” he grinned. “Everything has stayed the same and the boys have been brilliant with me. “It’s been a long time since I’ve been away with Northern Ireland, Denmark in June. I’ve missed them and I’m buzzing to be back.” Bradley is gutted Jurgen Klopp will be leaving at the end of the season and will always be grateful to him for believing in him. “He’s helped me massively,” he said. “He gave me my first chance with Liverpool so I’ll forever be grateful to him. “When I found out he was leaving, I was just shocked and quite sad to be honest because he’s the only manager I’ve ever known at Liverpool. “The future’s big, I’m really looking forward to the run-in after these two Northern Ireland games. “Hopefully we can do as well as we can and I’ll have a medal at the end of the season.” Join our new WhatsApp communityand receive your daily dose of Mirror Football content. We also treat our community members to special offers, promotions, and adverts from us and our partners. If you don’t like our community, you can check out any time you like. If you’re curious, you can read ourPrivacy Notice.

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Joe Gomez recalls disappointment after being booed on last England appearance

Joe Gomez cannot wait to play for England in front of a Wembley crowd again … despite being JEERED by the HOME fans the last time it happened. Gomez appeared as a late substitute when Gareth Southgate ’s men thrashed Montenegro 7-0 in November, 2019. But Gomez was BOOED by England supporters, having been involved in a canteen bust-up with Raheem Sterling four days prior to the game. Southgate suspended Sterling – who had clashed with the Liverpool defender during Manchester City’s match at Anfield the previous weekend – from the game, but fans clearly blamed Gomez. “You never want that to happen in front of your own crowd,” said Gomez, recalled to Southgate’s squad after more than three years away. “It was testing. It wasn’t great. I’d be lying (if I said otherwise) … I didn’t let it consume me too much. I am looking forward to getting back in front of the fans and playing. Wembley is such a special stadium.” Gomez played three more times for England after being booed at Wembley but all those games were behind closed doors during the Covid pandemic. And after suffering a career-threatening injury while training with England in November, 2020, Gomez is delighted to be back in the international fold. He said: “It is surreal because four years is quite a long time and I spent a fair amount of that time wanting to be back in the mix. I would be lying if I said I hadn’t spent time thinking about wanting to be back with the boys and getting back to this level. “It is a privilege to be here and now I want to play my part.” Explaining the emotions he felt on going back to St George’s Park and the fateful pitch where he suffered his injury, he said: “I would be lying if I said it did not have a psychological toll as I left here in an ambulance quite abruptly. It was a bit surreal. I sort of prepared myself, mentally, but I think there was a bit of an underlying trauma that I can draw a line under, coming back. It meant a lot in that sense. “It was the same pitch. We were doing an 11 v 11 when I got the injury. It was quite unique, it was a patella tendon rupture. I was by myself. I just went to play a pass. I planted my foot and then … it ruptured, it was quite gruesome. My kneecap was halfway up my leg. A lot of it is a blur because it was a bit painful. “From that point, it was a massive part of my life, probably the hardest point in my career – just that moment because of how it happened. The last time I saw Gareth I was on the bed waiting for the ambulance. It was tough and it is a big part of my journey that I wouldn’t shy away from.” Join our new WhatsApp community and receive your daily dose of Mirror Football content. We also treat our community members to special offers, promotions, and adverts from us and our partners. If you don’t like our community, you can check out any time you like. If you’re curious, you can read our Privacy Notice.

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Harry Kane a doubt for Brazil clash as Gareth Southgate faces fresh England dilemma

Harry Kane is a fitness worry ahead of England’s friendly with Brazil on Saturday night. England captain Kane, Jordan Henderson, Cole Palmer and Bukayo Saka all missed the full training session on Wednesday and worked on their own fitness programmes. It is a blow for England boss Gareth Southgate who was keen to use the friendlies with Brazil and Belgium as warm up games ahead of the Euros as this camp will be the last get-together before the squad is named for the summer.‌ Bayern Munich will be anxious that no chances are taken with Kane who suffered a twisted ankle after colliding with a post and having to come off injured last weekend. Ajax midfielder Henderson, 33, has a muscle issue while Saka and Palmer have also played big numbers of games this season. Southgate is already without the likes of Luke Shaw and Trent Alexander-Arnold which has limited his chances for a full Euros rehearsal this weekend. If Kane is not risked against Brazil then Southgate would have to decide who to give an opportunity to out of Ollie Watkins and Ivan Toney. Watkins in particular has been in fine form this season, registering 16 goals and 10 assists in 29 Premier League appearances for Aston Villa. Toney, on the other hand, has netted four times in 10 games for Brentford since returning from an eight-month betting ban. Southgate handed the 27-year-old his first senior cap last year. Both will be keen to deputise in Kane’s absence, particularly as Southgate conceded last week that he may not be able to include both strikers in his squad for the Euros. Join the debate! Who would you start up front if Kane isn’t fit? Let us know here. “Maybe, maybe not. I genuinely don’t know the answer to that,” he said when he was asked about the duo’s hopes. “That will depend on what kind of profile we need, what the profiles of the rest of the squad [members] are, whether we need a couple of players that are adaptable in a couple of positions that means we can pick specialists in certain other positions.” Southgate then added: “I think we feel that Ivan is one of the contenders in that role, so [it is] important to bring him back in and be able to work with him again. “He has shown, coming back into Brentford’s team, the impact and quality that he can have. Equally, Ollie is having an outstanding season with Aston Villa and is a player in excellent form. I have to say Unai [Emery] has done an excellent job with Villa, and he’s a player who has benefited from that.” Join our new WhatsApp community and receive your daily dose of Mirror Football content. We also treat our community members to special offers, promotions, and adverts from us and our partners. If you don’t like our community, you can check out any time you like. If you’re curious, you can read our Privacy Notice.

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Julie Goodyear’s husband watching ITV Coronation Street star ‘slowly fade away’ in dementia battle

Julie Goodyear’s heartbroken husband has told of his pain as he watches the beloved Coronation Street star “slowly fade away” following her dementia diagnosis. The glamorous actress who became a household name as the Rovers Return’s no-nonsense landlady Bet Lynch, announced she was living with the disease last June. Now her husband, Scott Brand, has described their turmoil as Julie’s trademark leopard print outfits and colourful lipsticks have been left behind as the 81-year-old deteriorates. He said: “I miss the fun-loving wife that Julie had always been – the larger-than-life personality that brightened up everywhere she went, and the smile that lit up every room. All of this is now slowly fading away and it’s extremely painful for me to watch this deterioration. Julie now struggles recognising people and everyone she meets is called ‘Scott’. He added: “Julie has always been extremely glamorous, going nowhere without her makeup. But now the lipsticks and make-up go unworn, and clothes are no longer of interest, especially the leopard print.” The couple, who tied the knot in 2007, met when Scott delivered some plaster to help renovate Julie’s home near Rochdale, Greater Manchester. Joining Corrie in 1966, Julie’s character became one of the best loved on the cobbles until she left in November 2003 and was awarded an MBE for her services to drama in 1996. Now Julie relies on a wheelchair to be mobile and Scott, 55, told how he longs for the days they spent enjoying romantic meals, holidays and walking hand in hand. He said: “One of the biggest things is our holidays. Julie loved going away and would always look forward to our adventures together, but this has now stopped. We no longer go away, and I can no longer go away either as I would never leave Julie.” After giving up his career to become Julie’s full time career Scott realised the small freedoms he had previously taken for granted like having a drink or watching the football with pals. “All these things now have to be planned in advance, and you can be so exhausted that it’s not worth the effort to go. “I’m now aware that if there was an emergency, and I needed to drive, I wouldn’t be able to – so alcohol is off limits.” He went on: “For me, the hardest part was accepting and coming to terms with the diagnosis. At the beginning I refused to accept any support, thinking I could cope as we have always been quite private people. “This, in reality, didn’t last for long and I soon realised I needed to ask for help as I couldn’t do it by myself. I wasn’t coping and needed to seek support. Caring for Julie is my priority, but my health was being affected and as a lone carer I felt it was ‘killing me’. “Julie had always dealt with the finances but now she cannot even recognise the value of money. I was suddenly thrown into having to sort out all the household affairs, something Julie had always managed with ease and perfection. “It was like being thrown into a new world of having to do everything by myself. I would advise anyone going through this journey to accept help straight away.” Now the couple have thrown their support behind a new TV advert launched by the Alzheimer’s Society, describing the charity as a ‘lifeline’ since Julie fell ill. The advert titled the ‘Long Goodbye’ is narrated by actor Colin Firth and shows how the relentless progression of dementia causes people to ‘die again and again and again.’ Scott added: “Not being able to spontaneously go out as husband and wife, holding hands as we stroll along, going for meals together and going shopping – all these losses for me symbolise the Long Goodbye.” The charity has provided a Dementia Advisor to ease the burden on Scott and help him navigate the support available. He said: “Since receiving Julie’s diagnosis, the support we have had from our Dementia Adviser Julie Mann has been amazing – I couldn’t have managed without it. “She has helped me to understand what dementia is and supported us in applying for financial entitlements. She has encouraged me to get our affairs in order and put plans in place for the future. “She has listened when I didn’t know what to do and has guided me on getting the right care package in place that suits both of our needs. Without this support I really don’t know how I would have coped – it was a lifeline when we both needed one and continues to be so. She has helped to take such a burden off our shoulders.” Alzheimer’s Society’s new TV ad, launched as part of the Long Goodbye campaign, shows a son delivering the eulogy at his mother’s funeral, recalling the numerous moments in her life when part of her ‘died’. The charity revealed that a sobering one in three Brits born today will develop the condition. Dementia is also the UK’s biggest killer, with over a million people living with disease across the nation. Kate Lee, Alzheimer’s Society’s CEO, explained: “This campaign seeks to tell the unvarnished truth about the devastation caused by dementia and it is very much informed by people affected by the condition. “The loved ones of people with dementia often describe it as a ‘living grief’ as, bit by bit, the disease’s relentless progression causes part of the person to die…again and again and again. But there is hope. Alzheimer’s Society, through its support services, is there for people affected again and again as they face the grim reality of the long goodbye.” ‘Dementia is not the priority it should be’, says Alzheimer’s Society CEO Despite high-profile people like Julie Goodyear and Fiona Phillips being diagnosed with dementia, increased publicity hasn’t translated into major action. Nearly 80 percent of respondents to a recent survey weren’t aware that one in three people born in the UK today will get dementia. Despite it affecting over 900,000 people in the UK, dementia is not the priority it should be. This is evident by how hard it is to even get a diagnosis, which is the vital first step towards unlocking support. As Chief Executive of the UK’s leading dementia charity I have a responsibility to ensure people recognise the scale of the challenge and ensure it’s addressed. But as the distraught daughter of a mum battling dementia, I have an even greater sense of duty. An unrelenting determination to make sure this cruel disease stops devastating lives the way it has my family’s. My pain has become my purpose. This week we launch a new TV advert that lays bare the stark reality of dementia. It depicts a son delivering the eulogy at the wake of his mum. His voice cracking with emotion as he recalls the numerous moments in her life when part of her ‘died’ as symptoms of her dementia took hold. When she could no longer manage to prepare her legendary roast. When she became unable to dress herself. And the most heartbreaking line: ‘when she asked me, her son, what my name was’. This moving ad offers a glimpse into the lives of so many experiencing what’s often referred to as the ‘Long Goodbye’ – the sense of living grief where parts of a person fade away as the condition progresses. At Alzheimer’s Society we’re there for people affected by dementia again and again and again, through some of the hardest and most frightening times. We’re funding groundbreaking research that will one day end the devastation caused by dementia. With predictions that nearly 1.6 million people will be living with dementia in the UK in 2040, I hope this advert will make people sit up and take notice. Follow Mirror Celebs and TV on TikTok , Snapchat , Instagram , Twitter , Facebook , YouTube and Threads .

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Nutty Chocolate Chip Cookies / Maman, Miami

In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the baking wafers, butter, macadamia nuts, almonds, and walnuts and mix on low for about 30 seconds to break down the nuts and chocolate a bit. Add the brown sugar and mix on low until the butter and sugar come together. With the mixer still running on low, gradually add the flour and salt and mix until incorporated. Add the eggs, 1 at a time, scraping down the sides of the bowl after each addition, and mix until the dough starts sticking to the sides of the bowl. Scrape down the sides of the bowl again and mix on low for 10 seconds more to evenly distribute the nuts and chocolate. Turn the dough out onto a large sheet of parchment paper and flatten into a square roughly 1 inch (2.5 cm) thick. Fold the parchment paper to completely cover and wrap the dough, place in a resealable plastic bag, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour and up to 7 days. Set a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 350°F (180° C). Line a sheet pan with parchment paper. Divide the chilled dough into 14 equal portions (about 3 ½ ounces/100 grams each) and using your hands, roll each portion into a ball. Arrange 7 balls of dough on the prepared sheet pan, spacing them about 3 inches (7.5cm) apart, then use the palmof your hand to flatten into disks roughly ½ (1.25 cm) inch thick. Bake for 6 minutes. Rotate the sheet pan as needed for even baking and bake until the edges are browned, but the centers are still a little gooey, 6 to 7 minutes longer. Let cool on the sheet pan for 10 minutes, then enjoy right away or transfer to a wire rack and let cool completely. Repeat with the remaining cookie dough.

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Washington Gov. Inslee signs fentanyl bill sending money to disproportionately affected tribes

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has signed a multimillion-dollar measure to send state money to tribes and Indigenous people in the state who die from opioid overdoses at disproportionately high rates in Washington. It was one of seven fentanyl-related bills Inslee signed Tuesday while on the Tulalip Indian Reservation, KING-TV reported. The bills, passed by the state Legislature this session, seek to comprehensively address the fentanyl crisis throughout the state by improving opioid education, overdose prevention, treatment access, recovery supports, and first-responder resources. “We need to equip first responders with the life-saving materials they need,” Inslee said in an online blog post. “We need to implement programs in public education and prevention. We need special emphasis on youth and Tribal communities. We need to increase the number of treatment facilities to make it easier to get help.” The state Legislature earlier this month overwhelmingly approved the tribes bill expected to provide nearly $8 million total each year until at least 2031 for the 29 federally recognized tribes in Washington. The funds will be drawn partly from a roughly half-billion-dollar settlement between the state and major opioid distributors. Native Americans and Alaska Natives in Washington die of opioid overdoses at five times the state average, according to 2021-2022 U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data that includes provisional numbers. The rate is one of the highest in the country and over three times the rate nationwide. Officials with tribes such as the Lummi Nation, about 100 miles (161 kilometers) north of Seattle, have said the money would be crucial. Lummi Nation declared a state of emergency last year over fentanyl, adding drug-sniffing dogs and checkpoints, as well as revoking bail for drug-related charges. The tribe also opened a seven-bed facility to help members with withdrawal and get them on medication for opioid use disorder. In its first five months, the facility treated 63 people, the majority of whom remain on the medication regimen, said Dr. Jesse Davis, medical director of the Lummi Healing Spirit Opioid Treatment program. “Native American tribes are disproportionately affected, and they have taken a proactive approach to treatment that deserves support,” Republican Sen. John Braun, of Chehalis, said. One of the other bills signed Tuesday, known as the Lucas Petty Act, will incorporate fentanyl education into the public school curriculum. The bill was named after the 16-year-old boy who died in 2022 after smoking marijuana he didn’t realize was laced with fentanyl. His mother, Maria Trujillo Petty, testified passionately in favor of the bill to the House and Senate during the legislative session. “No parent should have to go through the heartache of losing a child to an overdose,” said bill sponsor Democratic Rep. Mari Leavitt of University Place. “Our kids are facing a opioid and fentanyl crisis that is deadly and unforgiving. As adults, we owe our kids the information they need to make smart decisions.”

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Who are the runners and riders to succeed Leo Varadkar after bombshell announcement?

Despite the bombshell nature of Varadkar’s announcement and the genuine shock it has been to the entire political system, not least Fine Gael itself, the speculation about who succeeds him is already well underway in Leinster House. One name is pre-eminent – that of Higher Education Minister Simon Harris, who one Fine Gael TD claimed “came out of the womb wanting to be leader of a political party and taoiseach of Ireland”. Harris is the clear, odds-on favourite of the bookies and the only name mentioned by a handful of Fine Gael figures who spoke in the immediate aftermath of Varadkar’s announcement. “He’s his own favourite as well,” observed an ally of one of Harris’s potential rivals on Wednesday. It is no secret that Harris has assiduously courted the favour of the parliamentary party, Fine Gael members and the wider public in recent years. His public popularity soared as he navigated the first difficult and uncertain months of the Covid-19 crisis four years ago when he was health minister – a job that had caused him no end of political difficulties prior to the outbreak of a global pandemic. Since the summer of 2020 he has been in the relative political backwater of the Department of Higher Education, doling out good news like increased student grants, pledges of more student accommodation and extra college places. He stood in as justice minister for six months when Helen McEntee, another possible leadership contender, was on maternity leave last year and acquitted himself competently, maintaining a typically high-media profile throughout. All through this time he has been keen to avoid the perception of overtly plotting against Varadkar, despite it being the view of nearly all of his parliamentary party colleagues that he has been doing just that. Indeed, there has been a nervousness in his camp at any media coverage that might portray him as disloyal to the leader. But last week, with nearly all ministers away on St Patrick’s Day duties – and before he made his own brief trip to London – Harris is known to have met with at least one disgruntled Fine Gael backbencher to hear of their concerns about the party’s direction. Harris could not have known at that stage that Varadkar would return from the US and announce his resignation. But it does contribute to the inescapable sense that he has been putting the building blocks in place for whenever a vacancy arose. Today’s News in 90 seconds – 20th March 2024 That time has come and the view among some objective observers in Leinster House is that he may ascend to the throne without a contest, particularly if he secures the backing of the likes of Paschal Donohoe. Donohoe, the Public Expenditure Minister, has previously ruled himself out of any future leadership contest. But his future looks uncertain after he missed out on the job of IMF managing director last week. He may believe the top job in Fine Gael has now come at the right time. Another obvious contender was Simon Coveney, who lost out to Varadkar seven years ago but secured the backing of the wider party membership. However, he ruled himself out on RTÉ’s Six One News. “I got my chance and wasn’t successful,” he said. Rumours – repeatedly denied by his allies – have been circulating for months that Coveney is considering stepping down from the Dáil at the next election. McEntee was once considered a close rival of Harris’s and has made no secret of her ambitions for higher office. But many colleagues believe she has been damaged by a tricky spell in the justice portfolio. There is a belief among Fine Gael politicians and grassroots, rightly or wrongly, that she has been too focused on so-called “woke” issues and not enough on law and order – the blueshirts’ bread and butter. Then there is Social Protection and Rural Affairs Minister Heather Humphreys, who has spent the last few years doling out millions of euro in grants to voluntary organisations across the country. This is something which has made her wildly popular in some of Fine Gael’s heartlands. She may be more of a mind to run for the Áras in 2025, though one backbencher expressed the view she would make an ideal interim leader for the local and European elections and possibly the general election. A full leadership contest could then take place after those elections, they said. Among the junior ministerial ranks there are two names that crop up: the Financial Services Minister Jennifer Carroll MacNeill, who has made no secret of her ambitions is highly rated within the party, and EU Affairs Minister Peter Burke, who is well-liked across the party, particularly in rural Ireland. Allies of both were happy to let their names percolate as being among the runners and riders as Fine Gael grappled with Varadkar’s shock news on Wednesday afternoon.

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No bidders in court-ordered auction of house where Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi was detained for years

BANGKOK — No bidders appeared at a court-ordered auction Wednesday of the family home of Myanmar‘s imprisoned former leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, where she had been held under house arrest for nearly 15 years, legal officials said. Many in Myanmar view the house as a historical landmark of Suu Kyi‘s nonviolent struggle against military rule for which she won the Nobel Peace Prize. A court in January ordered the house and 1.9-acre (0.78-hectare) property in Yangon be sold with a minimum price of 315 billion kyats ($90 million), with the proceeds to be split between Suu Kyi and her estranged older brother. Suu Kyi’s lawyers had challenged the auction order. The auction was held in front of the closed gates of the lakeside property, which has served as an unofficial party headquarters and a political shrine for the country’s pro-democracy movement. While living there, Suu Kyi hosted visiting dignitaries including U.S. President Barack Obama, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. Suu Kyi, 78, is serving a 27-year prison sentence in a series of cases brought by the military, which seized power from her elected government in February 2021. Her supporters and independent analysts say the cases are an attempt to discredit her and legitimize the military’s seizure of power. “I want to announce that the auction is unsuccessful as there is no bidder,” a district court official who did not identify herself announced outside the gate. A man by her side struck a small gong, and a second man said: “The auction event has ended.” PHOTOS: No bidders in court-ordered auction of house where Myanmar’s Aung San Suu Kyi was detained for years A lawyer familiar with the legal proceedings, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to release information, said the court will continue to handle the case but the details are not yet known. The court-ordered auction followed a bitter decades-long legal dispute between Suu Kyi and her brother, Aung San Oo, who has sought an equal division of the property. Aung San Oo first sued in 2000 for a partition of the property but his complaint was dismissed in January 2001 on procedural grounds. He returned to court repeatedly over the following two decades to press his claims. The Supreme Court decided in August 2022, after the army seized power, to have the property sold by auction. The two-story colonial-style building was given decades ago by the government to Suu Kyi’s mother, Khin Kyi, after her husband, independence hero Gen. Aung San, was assassinated in July 1947. Khin Kyi died in December 1988, shortly after the failure of a mass uprising against military rule in which Suu Kyi was a leader and co-founder of the National League for Democracy party. She was detained in 1989 ahead of a 1990 election which her party easily won but was not allowed to take power when the army annulled the results. She spent almost 15 of the following 21 years under house arrest at the property. For most of the time, she was alone with just a housekeeper, and at one point had to sell some of her furniture to afford food. She remained there after her 2010 release until moving in 2012 to the capital, Naypyitaw, to serve in Parliament. She became the nation’s leader after a 2015 general election. Early this month, Suu Kyi’s legal team filed an appeal at Yangon Region High Court requesting that the order to sell the house be amended because Suu Kyi did not seem to know about the auction and had not been allowed to meet and give instructions to her lawyers about it. The auction was also challenged by the main organization that is coordinating opposition to the military government. Duwa Lashi La, acting president of the National Unity Government, which says it is Myanmar’s legitimate governing body, declared that the property is a cultural heritage site and prohibited its sale or destruction. Myanmar has been in turmoil since the army’s 2021 takeover, which led to nationwide peaceful protests that the military government suppressed with deadly force, triggering widespread armed resistance that is widely characterized as a civil war.

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Chuck Schumer snubs Benjamin Netanyahu request to address Senate Democrats

Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer denied a request from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Wednesday to hold a video call with Senate Democrats about the crisis in the Middle East and Israel‘s handling of the war with Hamas. Mr. Schumer “made it clear that he does not think these discussions should happen in a partisan manner,” a spokesperson for the New York Democrat told media outlets. The snub from Mr. Schumer, the highest-ranking Jewish elected official in the U.S., came days after he surprised colleagues with a lengthy floor speech calling for new Israeli elections and the ouster of Mr. Netanyahu over his handling of the war against Hamas and the rising number of Palestinian civilian casualties in the fighting. Mr. Netanyahu instead only spoke with Senate Republicans on Wednesday, during which GOP senators said he again assailed Mr. Schumer’s speech against him as “wholly inappropriate.” Republicans and Israeli critics have accused Mr. Schumer of interfering in the democratic election of a longtime foreign ally, but President Biden has refused to rein in the majority leader. A team of top Israeli officials is heading to Washington for talks ahead of a promised campaign by Mr. Netanyahu against Palestinian Hamas fighters in the southern Gaza city of Rafah, an offensive that many warn could result in huge new numbers of civilian casualties. “I care deeply about Israel and its long-term future,” Mr. Schumer told reporters. “When you make the issue partisan, you hurt the cause of helping Israel.”

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