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‘Classic Kiwi stayer’ Immediacy set for Guineas test before Derby

“He was capable of winning over 1800m with five weeks between runs and that tells you a bit about him. He is just naturally fit. “We thought about the [group 2] Alister Clark [Stakes at Moonee Valley] but we had Sunsets for that race and it’s a good chance for him to get on his right leg before the Derby. “We know it is a big step-up for him taking on group 1 winners like Riff Rocket [Victoria Derby], Tom Kitten [Spring Champion Stakes] and King Colorado [JJ Atkins] but he is just a good stayer. “We know this bloke has a stack of ability and it will be good to give him that test before getting over a trip he will really like in a couple of weeks.” Although this is Immediacy’s first preparation, Busuttin said he has been in and out of the stable since his purchase at the New Zealand Ready to Run sale in 2022 as they waited for him to mature.

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No favourites, no worries as McDonald plots Slipper day smash-and-grab

Champion jockey James McDonald starts planning for Golden Slipper day at the beginning of the year. Initially, names on his list were Fangirl, Aft Cabin and of course there was going to be a two-year-old for the biggest race of the day. But not everything goes to plan in racing. George Ryder Stakes favourite Fangirl was ruled out of the autumn through injury last week, but McDonald still has four group 1 rides challenging for favouritism without having the punter’s seal of approval. “I’m working out what I’m riding months before this meeting, and it is a case of just ticking off the lead-ups knowing that it’s one of the biggest days in Australia,” McDonald said. “It’s a day where you want to be winning and I have a great book of rides to do that. “It has seemed to have come together really well, touch wood, with the exception of Fangirl, but Militarize is a good replacement for her in the George Ryder.

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Race-by-race preview and tips for Albury meeting on Friday

Promising 2. Vaguer looks to have a mortgage here after making a mess of weaker class 1 opposition at Canberra 12 days ago, winning by seven lengths with still plenty in hand. While aided by a clear on-speed bias that day, it was only his second run off a 32-week break, and previously had run the smart Reet Petite to a length. Carries the same weight here after the claim, and looks destined to win far deeper races than this. Dangers: Tough 4. Foxtrot Bravo keeps putting in deep into the prep, and comes off a dominant provincial win over this trip when finishing hard from midfield. Keep safe 1. Easy Road, which draws to get cover back in the field, and powered home from well back to beat a handy BM64 field three weeks back. Gap to the rest headed by 8. Heromania stepping up from winning in a weaker company.How to play it: Vaguer to win. Race 3 – CLASS 2 HCP (1000m) Smart local mare 4. Rumours Abound resumes off a lengthy spell with a gear change. Put two dominant wins together either side of a six-month break last year before dropping out after leading in a tougher class 2 Highway at Randwick in late winter run on a soft 7. Suffered setbacks and was immediately turned out again, but signalled she could do anything this prep with a dominant trial win at Wagga 17 days ago. The more the track dries out, the better placed she is. Dangers: Tough filly 3. Outback Angel is the immediate threat after a strong first-up win in a weaker field as a hot favourite, and should run the quinella from this draw. Big market watch on 1. Luna Rocks, having his first run off a six-month break for the new home track stable, and trialled well last month, while 5. Tickleberry third up is the best of the rest.How to play it: Rumours Abound to win. Race 4 – BENCHMARK 58 HCP (1175m) Plenty of chances in this sprint, but no better value than improving 1. Ledecky’s Dream getting out in distance third up off a six-week freshening. Stalked the speed before going home best in a class 3 at Wagga, then failed to finish off against similar opposition to this when parked just off the speed. Was $2.60 into $2.40 that day, and the quick turnaround suggests she’s come on well enough from that outing. Dangers: Another Victorian raider, 4. Shooting For Stars, is very fit and over the odds deep into her prep after claiming a BM66 here two starts back. Lightly raced filly 8. Lyrical Beauty has to overcome a wide barrier second up, but she ran home OK in a tougher class 3 Highway sprint and will appreciate more ground here. Include in exotics, 3. Rich Result, resuming with a gear change, 9. O’Reg from a softer draw, and 11. Prophet’s Daughter, which draws the fence third up.How to play it: Ledecky’s Dream each way.

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Steve Coogan goes where few actors would dare as sex predator Jimmy Savile

But nothing he has done before comes close to the role of Jimmy Savile in terms of loathsomeness, even as there are echoes in it of those two other turns. Savile was a DJ before becoming a household name as one of the BBC’s biggest TV presenters. He was a man of enormous ego. And he was practised in the art of deception. If you saw the two-part Netflix documentary from a couple of years ago you will know what to expect: a portrait of a sexual predator and paedophile who used charitable works and his connections with the powerful to mask his crimes. You will know that he regularly dropped hints in public of his true nature. And you will know that the BBC either failed or chose not to notice what was going on right under its institutional nose, even to the point of spiking its own investigation into his alleged crimes just a month after his death in 2011. This four-part drama is from the BBC, and stands as a belated act of contrition and self-flagellation. It includes testimony from four of Savile’s real-life victims, and extensive clips from the archive of the real Savile on Top of the Pops, Savile’s Travels and Jim’ll Fix It – a show on which for 19 years he used the promise of making kids’ dreams come true as cover for inflicting nightmares that will never end – alongside Coogan’s through-the-decades portrayal. It’s as fascinating to watch as it is horrific.

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Nurse: Witnessing cancer and going through it yourself are two vastly different things

Deborah Murphy is a 48-year-old wife, mother of two and a Clinical Nurse Manager of a Community Palliative Care Team. She has been a nurse for 30 years, 26 of those have been in Palliative Care. Ahead of Daffodil Day, which takes place this Friday, 22 March, she shares her experience of cancer. IN JULY 2023, I was diagnosed with breast cancer, and I joined the thousands of men, women and children who that year became a cancer statistic. More than 42,000 people in Ireland each year receive a cancer diagnosis. One in two of us will be diagnosed at some point in our lives. But behind those statistics are the lives of people affected by cancer. In my work as a palliative care nurse, I have looked after people of all ages affected by cancer, from young children right up to people in older age. Cancer doesn’t discriminate. My experience After finding a lump in my breast and going to my GP, I was referred to the local triple assessment clinic and seen within two weeks. It took a further two weeks for the mammogram and ultrasound. Two days before I was due to go on a long-awaited sunshine family holiday my office phone rang. A cancellation appointment was free, and I had to go immediately. That was the last phone call I took in my office. An hour after that call my world, as I knew it, fell apart. I was all but told I had cancer, but they had to wait for test results to come back before they could tell me definitively. I tried to return to work straight after it, but looking back I was in total shock. I was totally blindsided. I remember calling my husband and telling two colleagues, and then I drove home. That’s the last time I have been able to work. The last time my life didn’t have cancer in it. From carer to patient I’ve worked within the health system and supported so many people through navigating cancer for so long that I thought my experience and professional knowledge would help me. But witnessing cancer and going through it yourself are two vastly different things. Being a Palliative Care Nurse, the majority of patients you see are not going to recover from their cancer. My view of cancer is very skewed. So, for me, it became quite difficult to reconcile that with my own diagnosis. It’s as if I had to de-programme myself from associating cancer with death, which is much easier said than done. The waiting around was unbearable. Despite being fairly certain I had cancer, they couldn’t confirm my diagnosis for weeks. It felt like it went on forever. You would think that surely this process could be streamlined for patients and the clinicians involved so that the waiting around is kept to a minimum. Why are waiting lists for life-saving scans so long? The Noteworthy team wants to find out. Support this project here. Following my lumpectomy, it was another eight-week wait until my chemotherapy started. The wait for chemotherapy, although longer, mentally, felt easier. The surgery had at least removed the cancer by that point. Don’t get me wrong, it was still unbearable, painfully hard, but it was less mentally torturous. Eight months on from my diagnosis, I had my last planned chemotherapy last week and now I’m between treatments awaiting my radiotherapy to start. Working within the health system and being on the receiving end of it has been an interesting experience. Despite the support I’ve had, at times, I have felt very alone and lacking in guidance. The nurses, doctors, administration staff, kitchen staff, cleaners and porters are amazing and give you everything they can. There just aren’t enough of them. Getting my head shaved when my hair was falling out was extremely hard. I now look like a cancer patient. People can see now. I can’t hide what is happening. The one silver lining is that it is great not having to wash your hair! Difficult treatments I don’t want to scare readers, but for me, chemotherapy has been the hardest thing I’ve ever had to go through in my life. I found it physically, emotionally and psychologically devastating. Every cycle presented its challenges, but each time, somehow you dig deeper. You dig deeper than you ever thought would be necessary or possible for you to do. And you get through it. The Irish Cancer Society has been there to help me get through it. I have signposted people to their services before but now I had to take the leap as a service user. I have had so much support from using their website, their online health and well-being courses, their Daffodil nurses, complementary therapists and more recently, free counselling sessions. My husband and I decided to tell our children the age-appropriate truth about what was happening to me. Before speaking to them, I prepared with an Irish Cancer Society counsellor, and this was hugely helpful. We have always kept the conversation open, and they come back with questions when they want. They say children are so resilient and it’s true. They have taught me so much through this experience. When I lost my hair, one barely reacted, said I looked funny bald, but the other needed me to wear my wig until he adjusted. We went at their pace. One afternoon my husband was taking them to get a haircut – we would usually do this together. My son who doesn’t like change asked why I wasn’t going and the other just said straight out ‘why would she come? She doesn’t need to, she hasn’t got any hair!’ We all burst out laughing. He gave us a glimmer that day. Support is key to recovery I have had so much unbelievable support from my family and friends. Being diagnosed with cancer really shows you who is important in your life, and who you are important to. It has affected so many people in my life, the ripple effect is massive. I’ve been told so many times that ‘you’ll get your life back when you get through the treatment’, ‘you’ll feel normal again’. I know this is said with love and good intent and meant to reassure me. But I know my life will never be the same again. My life has changed forever. I will need to learn how to move forward, but I know I am surrounded by love, support and guidance as I head into the next chapter of my life as a breast cancer survivor. I will get through the next step, dig deep and move into a new life. There’s no other choice. There’s too much to live for and too much life to live, not to waste. They say it takes a village to rear a child, I think it takes an army to get through cancer and my army is strong. Deborah Murphy is a Clinical Nurse Manager of a Community Palliative Care Team. The Irish Cancer Society’s Daffodil Day takes place on Friday, 22 March. To learn more, visit cancer.ie/daffodilday.

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Billionaire who made fortune from coal is building world’s largest renewable energy plant visible from space

A billionaire CEO whose family made its fortune from coal mining is building the world’s largest renewable energy plant that will be visible from space when complete, according to a report. Sagar Adani of Adani Green Energy Limited (AGEL) plans to transform 200 square miles of empty and barren salt deserts in India into a massive energy park utilizing solar and wind power plants, he told CNN Business. “A region so large, a region that is so unencumbered, there’s no wildlife, there’s no vegetation, there’s no habitation. There is no better alternative use of that land,” Andani told CNN. The executive director has a family history steeped in the energy sector. His uncle Gautam Andani — the second richest man in Asia — built his $100 billion fortune from Andani Group, which is India’s largest coal importer and the leading miner of coal, according to the outlet. The younger Andani, 30, said he is turning to renewable energy to meet the needs of India’s growing middle and upper classes and a predicted surge in electricity users. Coal currently produces 70% of the country’s electricity. AGEL is investing $20 billion to build out the renewable energy park in five years. When completed, it will be roughly five times the size of Paris and generate enough electricity to power 16 million households in India — or roughly the entirety of Switzerland, CNN reported. Prime Minister Narendra Mosi has promised that 50% of India’s energy will be from renewable sources like solar or wind power by 2030. They are ambitious goals as India’s economy, urban areas, and energy demand are expected to skyrocket. Over the next 30 years, India will experience the largest energy demand growth of any country in the world due to its surging economy, according to the International Energy Agency. “If you imagine 800 GW of coal-fired thermal capacity being added … this by itself will kill all other sustainable energy initiatives happening all across the world, in terms of carbon emissions,” Adani said. He admitted that it could not be 100% renewable sources as it wasn’t plausible at this point. “I think it’s also very important to respect the fact that every country has its own right to make sure that the people of their own country are well-served from an energy perspective,” Adani said to CNN. “So is India doing a bit of coal? Yes, of course India is. But is India doing a massive amount of renewables? Yes, there’s no question,” he added.

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Rising student loan defaults putting Social Security payments of millions of American seniors in jeopardy

A concerning trend has emerged where a growing population of American seniors are witnessing reductions in their Social Security benefits due to defaulted student loan repayments accumulated by their children or grandchildren. With over $125 billion in accumulated debt held by Americans aged 60 and above, experts warn this could jeopardize the economic security of millions who depend on these payouts. Recent data reveals a sharp rise in the number of Social Security beneficiaries experiencing payment offsets owing to unpaid student loans. For many retirees living on fixed incomes, even partial withholding of benefits can have dire consequences, potentially pushing them below the poverty line. However, a large portion of the collected amounts go towards covering inflated interest and penalty charges rather than reducing the actual dues. Recognizing the implications, several lawmakers led by Senator Elizabeth Warren are calling on key agencies to halt this practice as a matter of urgency. In a strongly-worded letter to the Social Security Administration, Treasury and Education Department, they note this undermines the core objective of providing economic stability to all Americans in their retirement years. The Senators propose a blanket exemption of Social Security retirement, disability and survivor payouts from any offsets pertaining to student loans. “Taking away funds from vulnerable seniors struggling to stay afloat solves nothing and only exacerbates their hardships,” remarked one signatory. With statistics revealing more entering retirement with this debt burden and its impact potentially widening in coming years, experts agree swift measures are needed to shield those dependent on Social Security the most. This remains a pressing issue demanding attention to safeguard the wellbeing of millions of American families.

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New bakery set to open in Glasgow’s Yoker

Pretty Baked will begin trading on Saturday, March 23 at 12pm. The business is based at 15 Kelso Street. Writing on Facebook, the owner of the business said: “I really am so overwhelmed with all of this, it’s been emotional! “Thank you so much to everyone who has helped me make my dream come true! “I really love it so so much!! “We almost went to Helensburgh but staying local was the right decision so here we are. “Our new location is 15 Kelso Street, G14 0LB. “I hope you love it as much as me and I can’t wait to show you all and take you on this journey!”

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Almost 600 new homes for Glasgow Cowcaddens get green light

Scottish architects Keppie Design, who submitted designs for Global Mutual, said Glasgow City Council “unanimously approved” the proposals for a “major new residential neighbourhood” to be developed in the Cowcaddens area. As part of the project, Buchanan House will be deconstructed, with 94% of the existing building fabric recycled. The proposal for 595 new homes, amenities and community space, with new landscaped gardens and public realm is called One Cowcaddens. Glasgow-based Keppie, which dates from 1854 and is employee-owned, said: “The developer, Global Mutual, was commended at the committee meeting on their ‘textbook’ proposal, with councillors particularly pleased with their efforts to minimize the carbon footprints of the proposal, noting that this approach should be an exemplar for other developments in the city.” The architects said the planning application is the culmination of a series of structured pre-application meetings and consultations, undertaken with the council over a 14-month period, to “develop the proposals and a vision for the site that aligns with the city’s ambitions”. The plans include roof terraces (Image: Keppie Design) Keppie said: “The proposed mixed-use development will provide high quality public amenity including new south-west facing public realm and active street frontage, with local retail and café to better serve the need of the local community. “This will form part of a civic scale ground floor and address the junction at Cowcaddens Road, whilst providing opportunity to spill out onto and interact with the public realm. “Residents of the approximately 600 new sustainable homes will have access to a plethora of amenity including roof terraces and residents gardens, lounges, gym and wellness and private dining rooms. “Residents’ amenity is strategically located to have uninterrupted south-facing views and direct access to green space. The highest amenity space is centrally located to create opportunity for elevated south facing panoramic views over the city.” The plans also include landscaped public space, and Frank Cossell’s artwork will be kept (Image: Keppie Design) The proposal ranges in height from 7 to 21 storeys, creating a layered urban response and providing opportunity for the active roofscape on the south-facing amenity terraces. Fronting onto Port Dundas Road, the development will enhance the public realm by providing ground floor commercial units “that activate the street”. The public realm incorporates space for spill out from these commercial units, public seating, planting and pedestrian movement. The proposal has also considered the future context of the Cowcaddens Road Avenues Plus project. This will see the pedestrianisation of a section of Port Dundas Road and the creation of a neighbourhood scale public space which includes an integrated active travel route, extensive planting and public seating. Keppie said in the design statement: “The site acts as a key gateway at the north edge of the city centre, where there is a real opportunity to repair the fragmented urban fabric. “The design team have analysed the scheme in terms of form, scale and massing to make best use of land in a highly accessible location, in line with the council’s aspiration to redensify the neighbourhood. The form of the proposals holds the street line to create a distinctive streetscape and active frontage to the street.” The site lies immediately adjacent to what was once Buchanan Street Rail Station, originally constructed in 1849 by the Caledonian Railway Company as its main terminus for the city, and lasted until the 1930s. The bronze Locomotion statue, designed by Frank Cossell, will be retained as a central feature within the new public realm as “a proud reminder of the site’s rich heritage”.

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Parkhead man had father in headlock during drunk-fuelled row

Stephen McGoldrick, 30, turned on Stephen McGoldrick senior, 52, at his home in Glasgow’s Easterhouse on June 24 2023. The pair – who were drinking together – got into an argument which turned violent. McGoldrick initially left and returned to the property when matters escalated into violence. He left again before he returned for a second time when he was apprehended by a police dog who injured him. McGoldrick pleaded guilty last month at Glasgow Sheriff Court to assaulting his father to his injury. Sheriff Andrew McIntyre ordered McGoldrick, of the city’s Parkhead, to do 180 hours of unpaid work. He was also put under supervision for 12 months. The court heard that the pair were in the property drinking alcohol. Prosecutor Jessica McGowan said: “An argument took place between them which caused McGoldrick to leave. “McGoldrick’s mother and sister attended the property before he returned. “Matters escalated between McGoldrick and his father. “He put his arm around his father’s neck and while doing that he repeatedly punched him to the head and chest.” The pair were separated and the police were contacted. McGoldrick left the property and later returned near the property while the police were there. Miss McGowan stated that McGoldrick was initially taken to hospital after a police dog was used to apprehend him. His father was found to have suffered grazing to his head as well as pain to his head and chest.

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