Home » Page 451
Categorieslatest

Florida man says space object crashed into his house. Why NASA is taking him seriously

NASA is investigating an object that a Florida resident says came from space and plummeted into his home last month. Alejandro Otero said a piece of equipment from the International Space Station hit his Naples home and posted photos on X in response to an astronomer who was tracking where and when the equipment entered Earth’s atmosphere. Otero was on vacation but said the object caused significant damage and nearly stuck his son, local outlet WINK News first reported. “My son was home when the piece tore through the roof with a loud crash that could be heard on our security cameras as well,” Otero told Fox News. “We cut our trip short to make it back home as quickly as possible, because we really didn’t know what happened at the time and it was quite a shock!” “It was quite traumatic and there was quite a lot of damage to the house of course,” he added. HOW NASA JUST MADE HISTORY USING A CAT VIDEO Otero’s social media posts included Nest security video footage of the mid-afternoon crash in addition to photos of the cylindrical object. “It didn’t look like anything I had ever seen before,” Otero told Fox News. “It looked like it had been burned up and scraped, and it was a heavy piece for its size.” The astronomer, Jonathan McDowell, replied to Otero’s post saying the time and location were consistent with predictions on where and when the equipment would enter the atmosphere. He also agreed that it appeared to be part of the EP-9 battery pallet. “I thought it could have come from space, and sure enough, the research lined up to the batteries that were discharged from the ISS two years earlier,” Otero said. In March 2021, NASA announced that an external pallet of batteries had been released from the International Space Station 260 miles above Earth. NASA said the pallet would orbit Earth for around two to four years before burning up in the atmosphere without causing harm. INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION ASTRONAUTS REDEFINE ‘THE RIGHT STUFF’ FOR THE MODERN ERA A NASA spokesperson told Fox News on Wednesday that the space agency was investigating the object and the causes of the crash. “NASA collected an item in cooperation with the homeowner on March 28, and will analyze the object at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida as soon as possible to determine its origin,” NASA Deputy News Chief Jennifer Dooren said in a statement. “More information will be available once the analysis is complete.” ASTRONAUTS ABOARD THE ISS SHARE WHAT IT TAKES TO GET TO SPACE: CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP Otero previously pleaded on X last month for NASA’s help and for any responsible agencies to cover the damage caused, but told Fox News his insurance is covering the repairs. The Florida resident said the experience terrified his family, but was thankful there weren’t any serious injuries. “This is just such an astonishing event that makes us all stop and think about the future,” Otero told Fox News. “We have good starting point for a discussion on how to do space in a responsible way, because this near-miss incident is a warning signal to the space community.”

Categorieslatest

What’s Your Favorite New York City Restaurant

This week, The New York Times restaurant critic, Pete Wells, has revisited his list of the 100 best restaurants in New York City, adding new places, dropping others and changing his rankings of many old favorites. Read Pete Wells’s list of the 100 best restaurants in New York City in 2024. We’re expecting a spirited response to his revisions — because, as the saying goes, “everyone’s a critic.” And that goes double for New Yorkers: When it comes to dining here, there aren’t just one or two sources for incredible Italian, Thai, Peruvian or Jamaican food; there are dozens or even hundreds. And not all are created equally. With that in mind, we’re asking readers which places top their own New York City restaurant lists, and why. Is it a tiny French bistro you’ve frequented for 30 years? Or a neighborhood spot that has become part of your community? Your absolute favorite may have closed decades ago, but we’d still like to hear about it. We’ll read every submission and contact you if we’re interested in publishing yours. We won’t publish any part of your submission without reaching out to you and hearing back. We also won’t use your contact information for any reason other than to follow up with you, nor will we share it outside our newsroom. Thanks!

Categorieslatest

‘Modern Love Podcast’: The Second Best Way to Get Divorced, According to Maya Hawke

This transcript was created using speech recognition software. While it has been reviewed by human transcribers, it may contain errors. Please review the episode audio before quoting from this transcript and email transcripts@nytimes.com with any questions. From “The New York Times,” I’m Anna Martin. This is “Modern Love.” And our guest today is Maya Hawke. You might know her as Robin Buckley, a wisecracking but open hearted teen on the paranormal TV series “Stranger Things.” I should stop talking. I have said everything I need to say. But then I guess I get nervous, and the words, they just, they keep spilling out. And it’s like my — Or as a fearless Jo March from the BBC’s “Little Women.” I need to not live out my entire life in the tiny town where I was born. You might also think of Maya as the daughter of Ethan Hawke and Uma Thurman. But Maya isn’t a kid anymore. She’s in her mid-20s now. I just saw her in Wes Anderson’s latest movie “Asteroid City,” where she plays a kind of buttoned-up schoolteacher. As you know, boys and girls, your parents arrived late last night by military helicopter. They’ve been sequestered in that metal hut over there for the past several hours. And in a new biopic called “Wildcat,” Maya portrays a tortured Flannery O’Connor. Dear God, please. I can never seem to escape myself unless I’m writing. She’s also a singer songwriter. In May, she’ll put out her third album “Chaos Angel.” Here’s a single from it called “Missing Out.” (SINGING) Missin’ out, missin’ out, missin’ out Now I know it’s me who’s missin’ out Maya hopped on a call with me in her downtime from shooting “Stranger Things.” When we asked her to pick an essay for this special “Modern Love” anniversary series we’re doing, she chose one called “Our Kinder, Gentler, Nobody-Moves-Out Divorce,” by Jordana Jacobs. It’s a story about a couple that keeps living together after they break up for the sake of their kid. When Maya was little, her own famous parents went through a very public, very tumultuous divorce. It made headlines. But outside the spotlight, Maya had to do something so many kids of divorce have to, navigate a life split between two different homes. Today, she opens up about that time and how it affected her work, her relationships, and the way she thinks about love now. [LIGHT GUITAR STRUMS] Maya Hawke, welcome to “Modern Love.” Oh, thank you so much, Anna. I couldn’t be happier to be here. So you have said in some interviews that you have a kind of nervous habit. You’ve said that when you’re anxious, you talk a lot, and you talk very fast. Does that still happen for you? Totally. I mean, you’ll probably see it today even. But it does. Honestly, it happens more than ever doing press. I want to make sure that they understand my exact point of view. And I think if I was smarter, I would just get quiet and try to zero in on what I thought. And then say one perfect, concise sentence. But how hard is that? Yeah, it’s very difficult. So instead, I just kind of talk until I get to the thing that I mean. And eventually, you do get there. And eventually, I do get there. You’ve also said in interviews that this kind of chatter that you do has followed you into your work. And the writers of “Stranger Things” noticed it. So they gave your character on the show, Robin, a bunch of monologues. Do you find that a lot of yourself ends up in your on screen roles, or are you stepping into a totally new personality when you’re performing? I think it really depends. An interesting thing about television is that because you play the character for so long, it’s actually more important, I think, that they take on some qualities of you, and also more inevitable that they will because the writers are actively writing while you are shooting. So they are getting to know the actor and the performer as they are creating their story. Yeah. And so there’s a blurring of the lines that both inspires the writers as they get to know you better. And you kind of don’t want to be in a situation where — I’ll eat my words on this someday — but where you’re working for a year on a character that requires you to not be yourself to play because then you kind of lose a year of your life a little bit. I did a movie last year called “Wildcat,” where I was playing Flannery O’Connor who’s very depressed, and lonely, and dark. And I’m in no way a method actor. But even when you’re not, the shadow of the person that you’re playing starts to overtake you. When I was shooting that, I felt like the loneliest person in the world. Wow. And if you’re shooting for a month, that’s fine. But if you’re working for a year, I don’t really want to feel like the loneliest person in the world for a year. And I would much rather feel like a babbling, intelligent, funny, sarcastic, buffoon. You are joking, obviously. But feeling like the loneliest person in the world sounds really hard. How did you kind of claw yourself back from that? Well, one great way is to come up with a new thing to do right away. And so the day after we wrapped, I went back to New York City, and I started touring my last record. And so I went right into rehearsals and right into a new feedback loop, which is my band who are some of my oldest friends. And so a big part of how I think we remember who we are as people is our community reminding us who we were and who we want to be. I went directly from feeling like the loneliest person in the world to being on a tour bus with my four favorite dudes. And so that was a pretty easy transition to get out of the blues, I will say. I hear you. So Maya, the “Modern Love” essay you chose to read today is called “Our Kinder, Gentler Nobody-Moves-Out Divorce.” And it’s by Jordana Jacobs. Without any spoilers, the title kind of indicates it’s about an unconventionally close living situation between two divorcing people. Can you tell me before you read why you chose this essay? Yeah, I chose it because it’s a subject of extreme interest to me. My parents got divorced when I was a kid. And I am under no illusions, or I’m under slightly fewer illusions. I still have some illusions of like the enduring, eternal Cinderella love story. Sure. And so it seemed to me that maybe one of the better ways to go into a long term relationship is not just thinking about how you’re going to fall in love, but if you did break up, how would you handle that. And are you with someone who you think you could have a good breakup with? So I’ve just been really interested in how all the different ways to get divorced. And is there a good way, or are they all bad? I love this framing that it’s sort of a falling out of love story or figuring out how to live after falling out of love story. I would say, I want to hear you read this thing. So whenever you’re ready. Great. “Our Kinder, Gentler, Nobody-Moves-Out Divorce.” by Jordana Jacobs [SOFT MUSICAL TONES] “When my ex-husband’s girlfriend stepped out of the bathroom wrapped in a towel, beads of water dripping from her brown hair, she ran into me — the ex-wife. Dashing from the bedroom they often share with my ex husband’s dirty clothes in my arms, Hi, I was just getting his — I said, before scurrying back down the stairs where I was doing our laundry. I can think of few moments that better capture that time in our lives, me with my ex’s pungent laundry in my arms, trying to disappear as if I were the maid to a volatile celebrity. For two people who need a prefix of negation to refer to each other, my ex and I have had a rather porous boundary between my place and his. He and I live on separate floors of a two family house in Brooklyn. Our eight-year-old son can run upstairs to beg his father to let him play Minecraft and run downstairs to have the Cheerios he likes with me. I dip into my ex’s apartment when a recipe calls for chia seeds, and he knocks on my door when I need help resetting the clock that’s too high for me to reach. We have been like this for more than two years. Technically, we’re still married, although we’ve filed for divorce. Some of the neighbors still seem to think we’re together. The kindly pharmacist always asks for updates and sends his regards. But we aren’t a couple. We no longer share a bed, no longer smooch, no longer take turns making the salad, no longer give each other heartfelt back rubs, no longer dream of trips to Italy, no longer put our arms around each other in public, no longer fight about the shades being crooked, no longer outsource our intimacy to Netflix, no longer write checks to a couple’s counselor, no longer hope to fix it. But for a while, we were still enmeshed in each other’s lives, which is why I was caught in the act of doing a wifely chore by the woman with whom he is building intimacy and trust. After that, we decided the division between our places needed some clearer boundaries. Some things had to change, including laundry duty. It can be difficult to imagine feelings or arrangements that you don’t have language for. For example, learning the word schadenfreude, to name that dark feeling within yourself felt to me like the pleasure of tasting an entirely new cuisine. When I learned that word, I was not only relieved of the shame of that feeling, I could also laugh at myself for it. We don’t have the right vocabulary for our relationships with our former spouses. The term ex is loaded. The symbol X itself is a crossing out. As if by getting married and then divorced, you made a mistake that needs scratching out with a big red pen. Or maybe the X is a coming together, the meeting point of two diagonal lines and then splitting apart. But like many exes, we share a child. We never fully split. [LIGHT MUSIC] Unlike many exes, we share a checking account and a household. My ex is the source of the Y chromosome that made our son. He makes music videos with our child — him on the piano, the boy on the drums — and takes him camping for days at a time. My ex lives upstairs from me, encourages me to date, texts me CDC updates, discusses the boundaries between our apartments so he has a chance at building a loving relationship with his girlfriend, whom I like. And he texts me from the grocery store to see if I need anything. [LIGHT MUSIC] Our marriage didn’t work, but we made the most of our separation. When I was a child in the 80s, divorce meant war. If children weren’t the weapons, they were the casualties, custody battles, friends choosing sides, lawyers as strategies, generals, “Kramer vs. Kramer,” waking up in a Holiday Inn to your mother’s declaration that she was divorcing your no good father, a father denied visitation rights after the mother convinced the judge he was unfit. Children of my generation — Generation X, coincidentally — were raised on tales about the exes morning stench, their ineptitude in the kitchen, their refusal to cough up alimony payments. These days, we have our mediators. We get to keep our friends. We don’t abuse our children with hate. It’s a kinder and gentler time. My ex’s girlfriend has moved in upstairs. Hence, I have stopped doing my ex’s laundry. And I no longer find fine strands of his silver hair coiled around my leggings, nor do I run upstairs to pick up my work from the household printer, which lives upstairs, or grab almond butter from my ex’s pantry when I’ve run low, or check that our son has enough socks up there. Now that my ex has a partner, a person who must reconcile herself to this new fangled form of co-parenting, I no longer cross the threshold of their apartment uninvited. There’s much more texting. Yes, I was talked to, with a lot of wincing and unnecessary apologies. My ex explained that I can’t just run into their apartment willy-nilly anymore. I can be a little dense, but I’m not so far gone that I don’t understand that protecting the couple’s privacy is essential to the cultivation of their relationship. I know and regret that having the ex-wife live downstairs costs them. Of course, there are romantic costs on both sides. This is dating when your ex-husband shares a two-family home with you. [LOW MUSICAL NOTES] A man comes over, leans in for a first kiss, and hears your son pitt-patting in the apartment above. He tries to ignore it, but he can’t help but think the father of her child is directly upstairs from us. You’re looking good tonight. And though you have little control over it, your charm has made an appearance. Still, nothing kills the moment like the footfalls of an ex on the floor above. Can they hear us, your date asks, panting. Not at all, your answer, kissing his neck. But I can hear them, he whispers. Yes, but not the words, right, just sounds? OK, he says. OK. The next time you meet, he says, let’s just be friends. The costs also include, at times, a magnification of your loneliness. It’s evening. You’re cooking and listening to podcasts as much for company as for stimulation. Otherwise, it’s unusually quiet in your apartment. Your ex has taken your son upstate for a few days. And there’s no one to beg you to play Minecraft. His girlfriend stayed behind. And you can hear her voice upstairs but not her words. Chances are good that she and your ex are talking. Intimacy, you are reminded, continues without you. So does love. You’re the odd one out. But you also get what you pay for because you love your child, because being the primary parent makes sense for your family, because your ex is still as hilarious as ever, because his girlfriend is kind, and fun, and playful with your child, because you choose love over hate and what works over needless suffering. You stretch your imagination, deviate from the script, resolve to better prepare future dates for the unusual situation. Accept that you would have to contend with loneliness either way. Honor new boundaries. And make up the guidelines as you go, even if you don’t have the words or the script. My son asks, am I sleeping here tonight. Yes. He’s sleeping downstairs with me, but he forgot his book. The child is the only one of us who has free run of the building. He runs to your ex’s apartment where the couple is at the kitchen table having dinner. You can hear his little voice and their mature voices respond. The camera pulls back. The building is like the set of a play where you can see through the fourth wall. Two people are having dinner at the kitchen table on the top floor. One is below, stage left, washing the dishes. You see a child running down the stairs, a book in hand.” [LIGHT MUSIC] Maya, what did that feel like to read? You did such a beautiful job. Well, to me, it’s pretty heartbreaking. But it also reminds me of the truth that in any situation, you choose your suffering. I can’t remember whose quote it is. I’m embarrassed. But loneliness is hard. Relationships are hard. You pick what kind of hard you prefer. And she clearly has chosen the kind of hard that actually welcomes a lot of love, and a little bit less loneliness, and less isolation, and paranoia, and demonization than the version that she describes from her parents’ generation. It’s actually lonelier to hate someone than it is to miss them. So choosing the pain of missing over the pain of hatred seems like a much better choice to me. But it’s still very moving. And it, I think, does a great job of not idealizing the conscious uncoupling or idealizing the relationship, but really showing the way that it is her best option. More from Maya Hawke after the break. Stay with us. [MUSICAL TONES] [THEME MUSIC] Maya, you just read a “Modern Love” essay by Jordana Jacobs, where she and her ex stay living in the same house even after they split up. As someone who experienced your own parents getting divorced, very publicly at that, when you were young, would this have been the dream situation for you, having your parents split up but not move apart? I think the dream situation is captured by the film “Parent Trap.” Secret twin. Yeah, secret twin, get your parents back together. But I think this would have been a pretty good secondary dream. I mean, I remember so many hard days and fights about packing your bag, and you forgot this medicine, and you have to go back and get it, and Sunday goodbyes. And then the whole day is gone because it’s all a transition day, where everyone is in strife. And I remember this funny conversation that I had with my dad where I wanted to go to a party with my friends. And he was like, but this is our weekend. This is our special time. This is our one weekend. And I was like, every weekend can’t be special. They’re all my weekends. And you get every other one, and my mom gets every other one. And I know that that’s hard. But that makes it so that every one of my weekends is special family time, and I need to build my friendships. This seems like a better way of being less possessive over your child and allowing your child to have some more consistency and normalcy in their life. Jordana’s living situation does seem like an unusually stable arrangement for her son. But in your case, you talked about all that stressful shuttling between your mom and your dad. How do you think that affected you as you got older? I think initially in my late teens and very early 20s, up until the pandemic sort of, and then I went through a big mental reset in that time period I think. But I was fixated on building my own family. I was completely obsessed with, I have to find a partner. And I have to get married. And I have to have kids really soon. And then we’ll have Christmas at my house. And everybody can be invited. And they can decide whether or not they want to come. And I’m going to be the home base. I’m going to take control over the concept of family by building my own and letting people meet me on my terms. And then thankfully, I did not get married and have a child. And instead, I was able to recalibrate and being like, I don’t need to build a family immediately. I don’t need to build a revenge family. I need to build a relationship to myself where I can be my own parent and where I don’t need reinforcements outside of myself. I need to reinforce myself. I’m very glad I don’t have a revenge family. I wonder if this shift that you’re talking about in your personal life also followed you into your creative life. Did it impact the roles you were taking or the songs you were writing? Well, I left school early. I dropped out of drama school. And I think that part of that decision had to do with the concept of revenge family. I want to be an adult. I don’t want to take money from anyone. I want a job. I want my own apartment. I’m adulting myself now. And I tried to do it young, and fast, and hard. And I think that I then, through the pandemic, actually allowed myself to be a kid. I moved back home. And I went back and forth from my parents’ homes during the pandemic on my own terms. And something healed, and my relationship to even my art became less like I have to make money. I have to be successful. I have to build this life into whoa, I actually love this. The reason that I wanted to go to drama school in the first place was because I love this work. And I love art. And I want to do it in the pandemic. I want to do it when no one’s watching. I want to read plays with my friends over the phone. And my kind of spark for my why I was doing what I was doing kind of healed in my letting myself be reparented. I’m so happy that you’re on the other side of that. And it sounds like you are really thriving creatively. I want to talk about your music now. You have a new album coming out in May. Yeah, yeah. It’s called “Chaos Angel.” And I know we can’t hear it yet. But because this is “Modern Love,” I have to ask, are there any love songs that we can look forward to on the album? Maybe the love song I’m most proud of writing is the title track, “Chaos Angel,” because there’s this thing that came into my head, which was all my relationships went in this pattern of crushes, romance, commitments, and then apologies. That song is a big love song about wanting to break out of that chaos loop and then kind of feeling like you do. I think I write mostly love songs about all different kinds of love. I mean, I remember when I learned how many of the most famous love songs were actually about people’s children — there’s a long list. Well, the album honestly sounds very “Modern Love.” Well, maybe it should become the official album of “Modern Love.” I think we should change the theme song. I think you’re totally right. Thank you so much. Thank you so much. Maya, thank you so much. What a lovely conversation. I’m so glad I had the chance to talk to you today. Me, too. You rock. And your podcast rocks. And that story rocked. Thank you so much. [MUSIC PLAYING] Hey, listeners, be sure to check out Maya’s new album, “Chaos Angel” when it drops on May 31. Next week’s guest doesn’t make movies or write songs, but she’s turned couples therapy into an art form. You won’t want to miss my conversation with Esther Perel. We grow up learning to be silent about sex and never talk about it. And then suddenly, we are expected to talk about it with the person we love. “Modern Love” is produced by Julia Botero, Christina Djossa, Reva Goldberg, Davis Land, and Emily Lang. It’s edited by our executive producer Jen Poyant. The “Modern Love” theme music is by Dan Powell. Original music by Marion Lozano, Pat McCusker, Rowan Niemisto and Dan Powell. This episode was mixed by Daniel Ramirez. Our show was recorded by Maddy Masiello. Digital production by Mahima Chablani and Nell Gallogly. The “Modern Love” column is edited by Daniel Jones. Miya Lee is the editor of “Modern Love” projects. I’m Anna Martin. Thanks for listening. [MUSIC PLAYING]

Categorieslatest

Federal budget to include more money for apartment construction loans

OTTAWA — The Liberal government has revealed another glimpse of what it will present in the coming federal budget, announcing it’s setting aside another $15 billion for an apartment construction loan program. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the initiative is being called “Canada builds” and is meant to “turbocharge affordable apartment construction.” The new money will bring the loan program’s available funding to $55 billion, the government said, and is aimed at building at least 131,000 apartments in the next decade. The loan program was launched in 2017 and has helped create more than 48,000 homes so far. “We’re going to make the entire pot of funding available for matching partnerships with provinces and territories who come to the table with ambitious and fair housing plans,” Trudeau told reporters in Toronto on Wednesday. Those plans can include low- and high-rise buildings so long as the money is used to build apartments “that the middle class can afford,” he said. Trudeau said the loan program is meant to ensure people can live where they work. Toronto Mayor Olivia Chow said that’s become a critical problem in her city. “When we try to hire personal support workers, public-health nurses, parks and rec workers, child-care workers, EMS workers, you name it — we’re having a hard time. Why? Because they say they can’t afford to work in the city,” she said. The government is also reforming the program to extend loan terms and expand financing to include housing for students and seniors. The federal NDP panned the announcement and the strategy behind it, saying 97 per cent of the units built under the loan program are not affordable. “Trudeau’s out-of-touch housing strategy is dominated by loans to for-profit developers that don’t help Canadians who need homes they can afford,” said housing critic Jenny Kwan. And the Conservatives said in a statement of their own that this appears to be more of the same “failed policies,” pointing out that more than half the available funds under the apartment loan program are not allocated. The federal government appears to also have an uphill battle ahead to convince premiers to get on board. Many of the government’s marquee policies — from child care and housing to dental care and pharmacare — touch on areas of provincial and territorial jurisdiction and require co-operation. That’s not been guaranteed across the country. On Tuesday, Trudeau announced a $6-billion infrastructure fund to support homebuilding and a $400 million top-up to the housing accelerator fund. The Liberals say the funding for provinces and territories will come with conditions, including adopting the recently announced renters’ bill of rights. While the slate of housing-related announcements earned praise from B.C. Premier David Eby this week, Ontario Premier Doug Ford said his government won’t sign on to any federal deal that requires municipalities to allow fourplexes. “The difference between ourselves and the federal government — and I want to work with them, I am working with them on a lot of different issues on a daily basis — I don’t believe in forcing municipalities. I believe in working with municipalities,” Ford said at a press conference Wednesday. He went on to say that municipalities are best positioned to ensure homes are built “where they belong.” Asked about Ford’s comments, Trudeau said Toronto has come forward with an “extremely ambitious housing plan” under the housing accelerator program. “We’d love to do that right across the province, but if the province doesn’t want to step up with ambition on building the infrastructure needed to support more housing in general across the province, we’ll do it specifically with willing partners,” he said. The Liberal government has said affordability issues are its top priority for months, and made housing a central feature of the cabinet retreat held before the fall sitting of Parliament began last August. Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland is set to table the federal budget April 16. This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 3, 2024. Sarah Ritchie, The Canadian Press Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version said the federal budget is next week.

Categorieslatest

Police say 6 puppies were found abandoned in cage at side of King Township road

A passerby called police on Tuesday after discovering six puppies in a wire cage abandoned at the side of a road in King Township. York Regional Police officers were called on Tuesday, April 2, at around 2:27 p.m. after the caged puppies were discovered in the Weston Road and 15th Sideroad area. “The puppies, described as being similar to a Husky breed, did not appear to be in distress and had no visible injuries,” a police release states. The puppies have been taken into the care of Animal Services. They are not currently available for adoption, police added. There’s no word at this point on who abandoned the puppies but police say they are seeking witnesses and trying to learn more.

Categorieslatest

The killing of aid workers adds to pressure on the UK government to halt arms sales to Israel

LONDON (AP) — Britain’s main opposition parties demanded Wednesday that the Conservative government publish legal advice it has received on whether Israel has broken international humanitarian law during the war in Gaza. They say the U.K. should ban weapons sales to Israel if the law has been broken. Britain is a staunch ally of Israel, but relations have been tested by the mounting death toll of the almost six-month war. Calls for an end to arms exports have escalated since an Israeli airstrike killed seven aid workers from World Central Kitchen, three of them British. LONDON IS THE ‘WORLD’S MOST ANTISEMITIC CITY,’ SAYS ISRAELI MINISTER David Lammy, foreign affairs spokesman for the main opposition Labour Party, said “there are very serious accusations that Israel has breached international law.” He urged the government to “publish the legal advice now.” “If it says there is a clear risk that U.K. arms might be used in a serious breach of international humanitarian law, it’s time to suspend the sale of those arms,” Lammy told British broadcasters London Mayor Sadiq Khan, one of the country’s most senior Labour officials, said “I don’t understand any justification for not publishing the legal advice that they’ve got.” “It’s important they publish that legal advice so that we can have confidence that the British government is following international law as well,” Khan told reporters in London. Two smaller opposition parties, the centrist Liberal Democrats and secessionist Scottish National Party, called on the government to halt arms sales to Israel. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP Prime Minister Rishi Sunak did not commit to publishing the legal advice, but said the U.K. followed a strict “set of rules, regulations and procedures” over licensing arms exports. “I have been consistently clear with Prime Minister (Benjamin) Netanyahu since the start of this conflict that while of course we defend Israel’s right to defend itself and its people against attacks from Hamas, they have to do that in accordance with international humanitarian law, protect civilian lives — and sadly too many civilians have already lost their lives,” Sunak told The Sun newspaper’s politics podcast.

Categorieslatest

Los Angeles ‘trash house’ drawing attention as eyesore, public safety hazard

A home in an affluent Los Angeles neighborhood known as the Fairfax District has drawn attention for not just being an eyesore, but what neighbors say is a public safety hazard due to trash gathering outside of it. Junk can be seen in the front and back yards of the home, with most of it being inside white trash bags. The clutter engulfs a car parked in the driveway, and even blocks the front door. Mounds of plastic buckets and empty plastic bottles surround the home, as caught on camera by FOX 11 Los Angeles. “Fire hazard,” one man said. “If anything ever lights up in there, it’s like everybody’s kind of a part of it. We’re all affected.” The home near Martel and Melrose Avenues is surrounded by multi-million dollar homes. Neighbors say the smell emanating from the “trash house” is unbearable, and they can hear rats running around the mess. They told FOX 11 they have seen the owners walk around with a shopping cart, stuff it with trash and take the trash back to the home. BODYCAM CAPTURES SUSPECT CLINGING TO MOVING CAR TRYING TO EVADE ARREST The homeowner, identified by the Los Angeles Times as Raymond Gaon, declined to speak. He has reportedly owned the two-bedroom home since the mid-1990s, public records obtained by the newspaper state. Neighbors say action was taken years ago to clean up the home and the homeowner was fined, but since then the situation has worsened. MAN EJECTED FROM SUNROOF DURING BIG SUR CLIFF FALL WAITS 2 DAYS FOR RESCUE “It’s been accumulating slowly,” a resident told ABC7. “My take on it is it’s kind of disgusting compared to everything else in the area.” “It’s a fire hazard. It’s filthy,” Miriam Kosberg, whose family has owned the property directly behind the house since 1955, told the Los Angeles Times. “There’s garbage all the way up to the back fence.” CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP City officials told FOX 11 they are aware of the situation and are weighing options. This could mean taking care of the cleanup themselves and charging the owner, they said.

Categorieslatest

Man who used megaphone to lead attack on police during Capitol riot gets over 7 years in prison

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Washington state man who used a megaphone to orchestrate a mob’s attack on police officers guarding the U.S. Capitol was sentenced on Wednesday to more than seven years in prison. U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth said videos captured Taylor James Johnatakis playing a leadership role during the Jan. 6, 2021, riot. Johnatakis led other rioters on a charge against a police line, “barked commands” over his megaphone and shouted step-by-step directions for overpowering officers, the judge said. TRUMP SAYS HE WILL FREE JAN. 6 RIOTERS ON FIRST DAY IF RE-ELECTED “In any angry mob, there are leaders and there are followers. Mr. Johnatakis was a leader. He knew what he was doing that day,” the judge said before sentencing him to seven years and three months behind bars. Johnatakis, who represented himself with an attorney on standby, has repeatedly expressed rhetoric that appears to be inspired by the anti-government “sovereign citizen” movement. He asked the judge questions at his sentencing, including, “Does the record reflect that I repent in my sins?” Lamberth, who referred to some of Johnatakis’ words as “gobbledygook,” said, “I’m not answering questions here.” Prosecutors recommended a nine-year prison sentence for Johnatakis, a self-employed installer of septic systems. “Johnatakis was not just any rioter; he led, organized, and encouraged the assault of officers at the U.S. Capitol on January 6,” prosecutors wrote in a court filing. A jury convicted him of felony charges after a trial last year in Washington, D.C. Johnatakis, 40, of Kingston, Washington, had a megaphone strapped to his back when he marched to the Capitol from then-President Donald Trump’s “Stop the Steal” rally near the White House on Jan. 6. “It’s over,” he shouted at the crowd of Trump supporters. “Michael Pence has voted against the president. We are down to the nuclear option.” Johnatakis was one of the first rioters to chase a group of police officers who were retreating up stairs outside the Capitol. He shouted and gestured for other rioters to “pack it in” and prepare to attack. Johnatakis shouted “Go!” before he and other rioters shoved a metal barricade into a line of police officers. He also grabbed an officer’s arm. “The crime is complete,” Johnatakis posted on social media several hours after he left the Capitol. He was arrested in February 2021. He has been jailed since November 2023, when jurors convicted him of seven counts, including obstruction of the Jan. 6 joint session of Congress that certified Joe Biden’s 2020 electoral victory. The jury also convicted him of assault and civil disorder charges. Justice Department prosecutor Courtney Howard said Johnatakis hasn’t expressed any sincere remorse or accepted responsibility for his crimes on Jan. 6. “He’s going so far as to portray himself as a persecuted victim,” she said. Lamberth said he received over 20 letters from Johnatakis, his relatives and friends. Some of his supporters don’t seem to know the full extent of Johnatakis’ crimes on Jan. 6, the judge added. He said he would order the clerk of court’s office to send all them copies of his prepared remarks during the sentencing hearing. “There can be no room in our country for this sort of political violence,” Lamberth said. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP Last April, Lamberth ordered a psychologist to examine Johnatakis and determine if he was mentally competent to stand trial. The judge ultimately ruled that Johnatakis could understand the proceedings and assist in his defense. Approximately 1,350 people have been charged with Capitol riot-related federal crimes. Over 800 of them have been sentenced, with roughly two-thirds getting terms of imprisonment ranging from several days to 22 years.

Categorieslatest

Body that washed ashore in 1992 ID’ed as Buffalo man who died going over Niagara Falls

A body that washed up on the shores of Lake Ontario in 1992 has been identified as a Buffalo man who is believed to have died going over Niagara Falls. Vincent Stack went missing in Niagara Falls State Park on Dec. 4, 1990. DNA technology helped identify his remains, which drifted 15 miles to the mouth of the St. Lawrence River and then 130 miles across Lake Ontario before washing ashore on April 8, 1992, the Oswego County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release. REMAINS OF GIRL, 16, EXCAVATED FROM FLORIDA MOBILE HOME PARK IDENTIFIED AS AUTUMN MCCLURE, MISSING SINCE 2004 The remains were badly decomposed and mostly skeletal when they were discovered, the sheriff’s office said. The medical examiner determined that the unidentified person had been dead between six months and five years. Thirty years later in 2022, the sheriff’s office renewed its efforts to identify the remains and reached out to the Niagara Regional Police Service in Ontario, Canada for help. Detective Constable Sara Mummery of the Ontario department assisted with obtaining a new DNA sample from the remains that had washed ashore in 1992 for comparison with missing person cases in both the United States and Canada, the sheriff’s office said. In February of 2024 the authorities were able to match the DNA sample with genetic material collected from the family of Stack, who was 40 when he disappeared, according to the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System. The sheriff’s office notified Stack’s family of the identification. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP The Oswego County Sheriff’s Office and the Niagara Regional Police Service are each working to identify other unidentified remains cases in the area, the authorities said.

Categorieslatest

Wayanad battle between INDIA bloc allies; suspense remains over Rahul Gandhi's Amethi candidacy – India Today

Congress’s Wayanad MP Rahul Gandhi is re-contesting for the Lok Sabha seat in Kerala. He filed his nomination after leading a massive rally. Meanwhile, CPI’s Annie Raja also filed her nomination and slammed Rahul Gandhi for his candidacy saying she announced her candidature first and “political sensitivity should have prevailed”. On the other hand, there is still the question of whether Rahul Gandhi will also contest from the Amethi seat and battle against BJP’s Smriti Irani.

Verified by MonsterInsights