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Share market gains on iron ore miners as investors await US inflation print

The West Australian Perth Now Click to open navigation ‌‌ Breaking News Economy Markets Property Commercial Property Workplace Matters Camera IconNot Supplied Credit: News Corp Australia Share market gains on iron ore miners as investors await US inflation print Jack QuailNCA NewsWire April 9, 2024 4:17PM Topics Originally published as Share market gains on iron ore miners as investors await US inflation print Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Email Us Copy the Link Your Local News Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to InstagramShare to YoutubeEmail UsGet Digital Edition Perth Now Email UsNewsletter Chevron Down IconSubmit story tip Camera IconSubmit photos Get Digital EditionDigital edition Chevron Down IconBack to top

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Mayorkas impeachment trial set to start in Senate this week, but may be over before it starts

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans will bring their case against Alejandro Mayorkas to the Senate this week, two months after impeaching the Homeland Security secretary. It will be thethirdtime in five years that senators are sworn in as jurors in the court of impeachment. The Republican-controlled House impeached Mayorkas by a single vote margin on Feb. 13, recommending that Mayorkas be removed from office over his handling of the U.S.-Mexico border. With two articles of impeachment, the House charges that Mayorkas has “willfully and systematically” refused to enforce existing immigration laws and breached the public trust by lying to Congress and saying the border was secure. After holding back for several weeks, House Speaker Mike Johnson said at the end of March that he would send the two articles to the Senate on April 10. Unlike former President Donald Trump’s two impeachment trials in 2020 and 2021, though, the Senate isn’t expected to spend much time considering the charges. Democrats who hold the Senate majority appear to have the votes to immediately dismiss the trial, though Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., hasn’t yet said what he plans to do. Democrats say the charges against Mayorkas amount to a policy dispute, not the “high crimes and misdemeanors” laid out as a bar for impeachment in the Constitution. Johnson and Senate Republicans are pushing Schumer to hold a full trial. “If he cares about the Constitution and ending the devastation caused by Biden’s border catastrophe, Senator Schumer will quickly schedule a full public trial and hear the arguments put forth by our impeachment managers,” Johnson said in a statement. The House’s 214-213 impeachment vote in February, a narrowly successful second try after the House had rejected the effort a week earlier, was the first time in nearly 150 years a Cabinet secretary had been impeached. And while the Senate is now obligated to consider the charges, two-thirds of the chamber would have to vote to convict him. Not a single Democrat has signaled support for the impeachment push. Still, there is a process that senators have to follow under the rules for impeachment. A look at the Senate’s next steps: CONVENING AN IMPEACHMENT TRIAL Under impeachment rules, a group of House managers — members who act as prosecutors and are appointed by the speaker — will deliver the impeachment charges by reading the articles on the Senate floor, usually after making a ceremonial walk across the Capitol with the articles in hand. Johnson has said that will happen on Wednesday. Senators are expected to be sworn in as jurors on Thursday, Schumer said in a letter to his colleagues on Friday. The Senate must then issue a summons to Mayorkas to inform him of the charges and ask for a written answer. But he would not have to appear in the Senate at any point. The president pro tempore of the Senate, Washington Sen. Patty Murray, will preside. She holds that role as the most senior member of the majority party. What happens after the Senate jurors are sworn in is less clear. The rules generally allow the Senate to decide how to proceed. VOTING TO DISMISS THE CHARGES If Schumer can muster a simple majority, Democrats could dismiss the trial outright or move to table the two impeachment articles, ending the House’s effort and allowing the Senate to move on to other business. While Schumer hasn’t yet revealed his plans, he is expected to try and dismiss the trial in some manner, if he has the votes. Democrats control the Senate, 51-49. Getting to 51 votes would require every single Democrat and the chamber’s three Independents to vote to dismiss, or potentially fewer if any Republicans join them. So far, no Democrats or Independents have expressed support for moving ahead with an impeachment trial. In his letter to colleagues Friday, Schumer told senators that their presence is “essential” when they will be sworn in as jurors Thursday — hinting that there may be a close vote held that day. While several GOP senators have questioned the need for a trial, it’s unclear whether any of them would go as far as to vote to dismiss the charges right at the start. One possibility is Utah Sen. Mitt Romney, who said earlier this year that he would be inclined to vote with Democrats if they hold a vote to dismiss. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky predicted last week at an event in his home state of Kentucky that Schumer will file a motion to dismiss or table the charges. “The Democrats have the majority so it may not go on very long,” McConnell said. “My preference would be to actually have a trial but I think the majority’s likely to prevent that.” REFERRING TO COMMITTEE If Democrats are not able to dismiss the trial or table the articles, there is a second option: They could follow the precedent of several impeachment trials for federal judges over the last century and hold a vote to create a trial committee that would investigate the charges. While there are no hard rules on how to form a trial committee, the Senate has previously passed a resolution authorizing the party leaders to each recommend six senators and a chairperson to run it. Those committees had the ability to call witnesses and issue final reports to the Senate ahead of eventual trials. While there is sufficient precedent for this approach, Democrats are likely to try and avoid it if they can halt the process completely, especially in a presidential election year where immigration and border security are top issues. Echoing Trump’s defense during his impeachments, Schumer has called the House effort a “sham.” “House Republicans failed to produce any evidence that Secretary Mayorkas has committed any crime,” Schumer said shortly after the House voted to impeach him. “House Republicans failed to show he has violated the Constitution. House Republicans failed to present any evidence of anything resembling an impeachable offense.” MOVING TO A TRIAL If the Senate were to proceed to a trial, senators would be forced to sit in their seats for the duration, maybe weeks, while the House impeachment managers and lawyers representing Mayorkas make their cases. The Senate is allowed to call witnesses, as well, if it so decides. Senators also have an opportunity to question the two sides before a final vote on whether to convict. In a February letter led by Utah Sen. Mike Lee, 13 Senate Republicans argued that a trial is necessary, writing that Democrats should not be able to “shirk their Constitutional duty.” At a briefing with reporters on Friday, Mayorkas appeared unconcerned. “When I say that I am not focused on the impeachment proceedings, I actually mean it,” Mayorkas said. “It is my hope that my time is not taken away from my work.” Underscoring that stance, Mayorkas will be at a Senate committee on Wednesday to testify about his department’s budget proposal. ___ Associated Press writers Stephen Groves in Washington and Bruce Schreiner in Shelbyville, Kentucky, contributed to this report.

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A rescue operation is taking place in northern Kenya after floodwaters swept a bus away

NAIROBI, Kenya — Police and Red Cross workers are engaged in a rescue operation at a swollen river in northern Kenya after a bus carrying an unknown number of passengers was swept away by floodwaters. Police say some of the passengers managed to escape just before the bus was submerged while others climbed onto the roof. It is not clear how many are still trapped inside the bus. The incident happened just hours after Kenya’s roads agency announced the closure of another section of the same road that was flooded after the Tana River swelled due to continuing heavy rains. Kenya Red Cross said it had dispatched two rescue boats to “ensure swift and effective response.” The government had on Monday issued a flood alert to residents of Tana River and Lamu counties after a dam upstream was breached by flooding.

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Trump tries to unburden himself of abortion albatross

Abortion may be the biggest threat to Donald Trump’s political comeback. Like an albatross he personally helped set loose. Now he’s trying to wriggle from its clutches. The former president has released his long-awaited statement on abortion policy and its evident objective is to defuse this as an election issue. It consists of two parts: Leave abortion decisions to individual states, and warn those states that adopting a total ban is a political loser. So even as he took credit for ending the constitutional right to an abortion, and as he applauded the judges he appointed for doing so in 2022, Trump asked his party to be pragmatic. He urged states to be lenient in cases of rape, or incest, or when an abortion might save the life of the mother, unlike the more severe bans already in effect in several states. “You must follow your heart on this issue, But remember: You must also win elections,” Trump said in a video he released Monday. Abortion bans unpopular The political math behind Trump’s position is obvious. Americans mostly dislike the abortion bans that have been unleashed across the U.S. South and elsewhere in more than a dozen states since the 2022 Supreme Court decision. Since then, Democrats have been outperforming expectations in byelections, midterm elections and referendums on the issue. By a 26-point gap, Pew Research found last year that Americans would rather see abortion be legal in all or most cases, than see it be illegal. In this tight presidential race, Trump would rather have voters focused on his own favoured issues: inflation and the porous southern border. There’s no guarantee his gambit will work. A plethora of factors will keep pushing abortion back into the news, and onto the president’s desk: ongoing court cases, complex federal-state issues, referendums and personal anecdotes. It’s disingenuous for Trump now to dissociate himself from the consequences of his own decision to appoint anti-abortion judges, said a lawyer who works on the issue. Trump’s position ‘utter garbage,’ says advocate “This is the president who let the horse out of the barn. Let it run away. And now he’s saying, ‘Maybe next year I’ll buy you a pony.’ It is utter garbage,” said Julie F. Kay, lawyer, author and executive director of the Abortion Coalition for Telemedicine Access. Trump, she says, is trying to make voters forget this is an election issue. For example, the president gets to appoint the leaders of U.S. agencies that affect access to abortion medication: like the Food and Drug Administration (which approves it and allows it to be prescribed online) and the U.S. Postal Service (which allows it to be shipped into anti-abortion states). The issue is a potential vote-driver. And not just in the presidential race. There are also myriad elections this fall at the state level — for politicians, judges, prosecutors and attorneys general; there are also referendums planned, including in presidential swing states, and in states that could decide control of Congress. “Every election is important around abortion rights in this day and age,” Kay said. “But this one in particular is very important.” Ongoing court cases Meanwhile, there are also ongoing court cases. The Supreme Court just heard one and will hear another. Anti-abortion activists are trying to overturn federal approval of the abortion pill mifepristone, although in a recent hearing the judges sounded unlikely to agree. The court will soon hear a case from Idaho about whether emergency-room doctors can refuse to perform abortions in an emergency. Meanwhile, some Supreme Court judges have mused aloud that shipments of the abortion pill could be halted under the 151-year-old Comstock Act: the 1873 anti-pornography law forbids mailing “lewd, lascivious” materials. “It sounds as antiquated as my grandmother’s corset,” said Kay, expressing disbelief that this is even up for discussion. As for the Idaho emergency-room case, she said it’s not an ER doctor’s business: “Their job is to save lives and people’s health. Not judge them. Not like, you know, ‘If you were drunk driving, I’m not gonna treat you because I’m so opposed to this.’ ” Then there are individual cases. Texas woman appears in Biden ad Like a Texas woman who had a miscarriage and couldn’t get an abortion afterward. She nearly died and fears she’ll never conceive again because of damage to her reproductive system. She’s now in a Joe Biden campaign video. It was first aired on Monday, after Trump made his abortion announcement. It’s a raw, emotional ad. In it, Amanda Zurawski starts weeping as she shows off some of the items she purchased for her baby, while screen captions tell her story. The ad concludes with: “Donald Trump did this,” referring to the abortion bans that swept across U.S. states, including 14 total statewide bans. Will Trump succeed at nullifying the issue? The answer could very well decide the 2024 presidential election. His move Monday elicited mixed reactions from his own side. Some moderate Republicans were pleased. His former vice-president, Mike Pence, was not, calling it a slap in the face to religious conservatives, like him, who supported Trump. On the left, there were complaints about the news media giving Trump exactly what he wanted out of this: A favourable headline. Abortion, immigration will swing votes: Pollster One pollster calls abortion a particularly thorny issue for Republicans. As immigration is for Democrats. “Those two issues will draw the most blood,” said Tim Malloy, an analyst for Quinnipiac University polls. His own polls suggest a mere three per cent of Americans identify abortion as their top election issue, far behind the economy, immigration and preserving democracy. But he says it remains more electorally potent than that number suggests. He credited it for Democrats’ better-than-expected performance in the 2022 midterms, when they defied polls to hold the U.S. Senate, nearly hold the House and gain in state legislatures. Abortion will stay in the news, Malloy predicted. As an example, he pointed to two court decisions in Florida just rendered on the same day. One will trigger a six-week abortion ban in the state on May 1. Another will allow a referendum to change the state constitution to guarantee abortion access. It will be on the ballot this fall, down the very same ballot as the presidential vote. It’s given Democrats new hope that they might be competitive in a state they’ve recently written off. “The right to choose is, I would think, the most visceral issue in America and the overturning [of] Roe v. Wade set fire to it,” Malloy said. “The fire’s still burning.”

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Malaysian Firm Removes Shoes From Sale Over Religious Complaints

Just weeks after Malaysia was seized by the controversy over socks printed with the word “Allah,” the country’s conservative culture warriors have fixed their sights on a new target: a brand of women’s shoes. Vern’s Holdings, a Malaysian shoe company, yesterday agreed to stop selling one of its popular lines of women’s shoes after complaints from Muslims that the brand’s logo also resembled the word “Allah” written in Arabic script. In a statement posted on its Instagram page, Vern’s Holdings said the logo stamped on the soles of some high-heeled shoes was a stylized silhouette of a stiletto heel with an ankle spiral wrap, including a picture to illustrate the connection. The company insisted that any similarity with the word “Allah” was accidental and apologized for any offense the design may have caused, adding that it had withdrawn the shoes from sale and would issue refunds to customers who bought them. “We have absolutely no intention of designing a logo aimed at belittling or insulting any religion or belief,” Vern’s said in the statement. “The management would like to humbly apologize and seek forgiveness. We hope for compassion so we can rectify this mistake.” The apology came after police said they had confiscated more than 1,100 shoes from Vern’s stores. Also yesterday, the Department of Islamic Development (JAKIM), a government agency that handles Islamic affairs in Malaysia, summoned the company’s founder, Ng Chuan Hoo, for questioning over the shoes. JAKIM leaves it to the relevant authorities to investigate as an investigation paper has been opened by the police, JAKIM Director-General Hakimah Mohd Yusoff said in a statement. JAKIM also does not want such a case to recur in the future, whether by Vern’s Holding Sdn Bhd or anyone producing whatever sales product. The footwear controversy followed a furor that erupted last month when socks with the word “Allah” were found to be sold at KK Mart, the country’s second-largest mini-market chain. After an ensuing outrage on social media, KK Mart apologized, though this did not prevent two of the chain’s executives from being charged with “hurting religious feelings.” Three representatives of the firm that supplied the socks also face the same charge. At least three KK Mart branches were attacked with petrol bombs and Molotov cocktails. The two incidents speak to the fragility of ethnic relations in Malaysia, where the Malay majority co-exists with significant ethnic Chinese and Indian minorities, and the potency of Malay anxieties dates back to the mass influx of Chinese and Indian laborers under British rule. Indeed, the executives of both KK Mart and Vern’s are Chinese-Malaysian, reinforcing old tropes that the country’s economically dominant ethnic Chinese minority is eroding Malay privileges. Above all, these culture war controversies reflect the willingness of ill-intentioned actors on the right-wing of Malay Islamist politics to stir up old ethnic and sectarian grievances for political gain. As Imran Said wrote in these pages yesterday, the “Allah socks” incident demonstrates how Islam “has been increasingly harnessed for political posturing in the context of competitive politics. This has resulted in often performative religious politics being adopted by Malay politicians in order to attract Malay votes, to the detriment of inter-ethnic relations.” This competition has been burning particularly hotly since the 2018 election, which brought the six-decade-long hegemony of the United Malays National Organization (UMNO) to a shuddering halt. The election, which brought the multi-ethnic Pakatan Harapan (PH) coalition to power, led to renewed competition for the support of Malay voters between scandal-plagued UMNO, the newly established Malay party Bersatu, and PAS, the country’s largest Islamist party. (The latter two parties are currently aligned under the banner of the Perikatan Nasional coalition, while UMNO is an awkward member of the current PH-led government). In this context, ginned-up culture war controversies are a handy way for Malay opposition forces to attack Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim and his PH coalition, while seizing the mantle of Malay representation from UMNO. The long period between now and the next general election, which will be held by February 2028, offers fertile soil for further controversies in the months and years to come.

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Indonesia’s Scorpene Submarine Deal With France, Explained

France’s Naval Group recently announced that Indonesia had signed a contract to purchase two Scorpene submarines, which a lithium-ion battery system will power in a deal valued at around $2 billion. The most interesting part to me is that both submarines will be built in Indonesia by state-owned shipbuilder PT PAL at its facility in Surabaya. This deal has been in the works for a while, and it helps consolidate the increasingly close defense ties between France and Indonesia. French aerospace firm Dassault is already in the middle of an $8 billion contract to deliver 42 Rafale fighter jets to the Indonesian Air Force, with the first planes set to arrive in two years. And Thales, a French technology company, is co-developing radar and other electronic systems with Indonesian defense firm PT Len. But the Scorpene deal represents a big, and risky, step forward. As an archipelagic nation covering a large maritime territory, some of which is increasingly entangled in geopolitical tensions, Indonesia undoubtedly needs a submarine fleet. In 2011, the country signed a deal to buy three Jang Bogo-class submarines from South Korea’s Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering for about $1 billion. The first two were built in Korea but the third was assembled by PT PAL in Surabaya and went into service in 2019. Involving an Indonesian shipyard in co-production was a big selling point for the deal. Indonesia was reportedly unhappy with the South Korean subs, and plans to procure three more were scrapped. The Indonesian government, however, never gave up on its ambitions and clearly wanted to continue the submarine program in some form. A big priority was to acquire more domestic production capabilities through transfers of technology, and infrastructure for the production of submarines was built at PT PAL’s shipyard in Surabaya. It has been pretty obvious that this Scorpene deal was in the works, as Naval Group already has a well-established footprint in the region and is frequently willing to give customers what they really want, which is production. In the early 2000s, Naval Group delivered a pair of Scorpene submarines to the Malaysian navy, which are currently in operation. In 2005, India purchased six Scorpenes for $3 billion. The submarines were produced by an Indian shipyard in Mumbai under a technology transfer deal. Naval Group did a similar deal with Brazil, except that one also involves development of a nuclear submarine. The third submarine produced under this arrangement was launched last month. It was this willingness by Naval Group (and French defense contractors generally) to share technology and production that made this an appealing deal for Indonesia. Both Scorpene subs will be produced by PT PAL in Surabaya, where the state-owned shipbuilder is also currently building a pair of Arrowhead 140 frigates under license from the U.K.’s Babcock. If everything goes as planned this would represent a significant increase in production capabilities for PT PAL by the end of the decade. But there are risks. The major one is that Indonesia’s Scorpenes plan to use a lithium ion battery system, which will allow the subs to operate submerged for longer periods. But lithium ion batteries in submarines are relatively new. As far as I know, Naval Group has never done this before with a Scorpene which means Indonesia will more or less be the test case for the new battery system. There is a good chance the program will be more costly and complicated than initially envisioned as they work out the kinks in the production process and with the batteries. Clearly, this is a risk the Indonesian government is willing to take. This is especially true because Indonesia is really into batteries these days, attempting to position itself as a global battery production hub for clean energy supply chains. Localizing production of the two Scorpene subs in Surabaya while co-developing the lithium ion battery technology is something that fits Indonesia’s strategic and military requirements, as well as its economic development goals. On the other hand, it’s important not to downplay the risk. In 2011, Malaysia started building six littoral combat ships in a local shipyard under license from Naval Group. To date, not a single ship has been delivered and the state-owned firm building the ships has basically gone bankrupt causing a bunch of collateral damage in the process. For Indonesia and PT PAL, there is a lot to be gained if the Scorpene program goes according to plan but also a lot to lose if it goes the way of the Malaysian LCS program.

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​Daniel Corkery: 'A leading figure in crafting the way we view ourselves as Irish people'

Corkery (1878-1964), a writer, academic and senator, was very much involved with the formation of the state. “After the struggle for independence and the civil war, he became a leading figure in crafting the way we view ourselves as Irish people and how we were going to construct our history and celebrate our culture and independence,” says Pearson. “He changed his mind once or twice over the course of his life.” Corkery was friendly with a journalist called DP Moran who produced a thesis called The Philosophy of Irish Ireland. “The two men were very much supporters of reviving the indigenous culture, interested in Conradh na Gaeilge. Corkery was close to Terence MacSwiney. They founded the Cork Dramatic Society together to revive Irish plays.” As a board member of the Crawford School of Art, Corkery championed people like the sculptor, Seamus Murphy. “Because he wrote about Gaelic and Munster poetry, he was involved with a lot of the poets at the time such as Seán Ó Riordáin. Where he becomes controversial in ways was his belief that to be Irish, you first have to be Catholic, republican and speak Irish. “People accused Corkery of being very conservative in his definition of Irishness and more problematic, who he was excluding from that. He became more conservative as he got older. Even though he was a great exponent of Irish culture, he was appointed head of the school of English at UCC. “He wrote in English, the reason being that a great proportion of the population couldn’t access sources through Irish because they didn’t have the language as it wasn’t taught in schools at the time. He even said in his biography that when he was growing up, he didn’t have any Irish at all.” Reared in the laneways of Cork city, the young Corkery wasn’t very keen on Irish culture or the Irish language. “But with the Gaelic revival at the end of the 19th century and the early 20th century, he became an enthusiastic convert to Irish culture.” The Irish language seems to be having a moment with, for example, actor Paul Mescal giving an impromptu interview as Gaeilge at the BAFTAs last year, the success of the Irish-language film, An Cailín Ciún, and other outlets in popular culture. “At certain times, the media picks up on fads and trends. The interest in Irish has been going on behind the scenes. There has never been a falling off in interest in Irish history and Irish literature. I think that only became evident when Shane MacGowan died and Sinead O’Connor died. We realised there was an interest in Irish culture in the 1980s when there was also Rick Astley and Kylie Minogue being played. “In the 1960s, there was the rise of The Dubliners and The Clancys, and in the 1950s, Seán Ó Riada. The interest has always been there. That’s why books like The Hidden Ireland are still so popular and relevant.” That said, Pearson acknowledges the ‘baggage’ some carry of the negative connotations of Irish. “I think that’s because it became associated with the system that we now recognise as being repressive. It wasn’t just the teaching of Irish, it was the teaching of religion and morality that went along with it. I would have felt that. Scholars of Irish felt it; nobody felt it more than Daniel Corkery.” Daniel Corkery: The Hidden Ireland – A Hundred Years On takes place at the Imperial Hotel, Cork, on Saturday, April 20

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Sligo's big dog, Kelly off the leash and Kerry's stat repository gets band-aid

Throughout he was a crutch, providing background information about debutants and various relations. Any time a player on the far sideline had that maddening white number printed on a green and gold shirt obscured by the sun’s glare, our hero was at hand to offer a final unequivocal identification. Midway through the second half, the attendance was announced: 4,117. Not great, by no means awful. Our local guru had a theory: “I have never seen that side as full,” he said, pointing to the bank across from the covered seats. It was a noticeable feature across several fixtures this weekend, a packed McGovern Park with a half-empty stand the most conspicuous. Stand tickets in Carrick-On-Shannon were priced at €30 with no concessions. Elsewhere it was €20. What about students or old-age pensioners? €15. Terrace only. Any kneejerk reaction to last weekend’s turn-out will be brushed aside by an association that banked gate receipts of €38.5m in 2023, up by a remarkable 15%. More games in a condensed calendar were always going to reduce one-off turnouts because that is what the Gaelic football season is about now. Episodes rather than feature films. That payoff shouldn’t discount the fact that there is a considerable section who will continue to attend religiously if they can afford it. At the recent Ulster championship launch, Jim McGuinness pointed out that a burst of outings in one calendar month puts a considerable strain on a paycheck when families are taken into consideration. There were juvenile tickets available on Sunday for €5 but they too were terrace only. One helps the other. A proper atmosphere goes some way towards elevating a live match, even if it is in a weakened provincial championship. The organisation should do whatever it can to deliver that. Here are eight observations from the opening round of the Gaelic football championship. Cavan master the elements and disarm the gunslinger Just before half-time in Clones on Sunday, Jack McCarron kicked Monaghan into a three-point lead and Cavan goalkeeper Gary O’Rourke rushed the subsequent kickout. Their go-to target Padraig Faulkner was deemed to have fouled Jason Irwin and Rory Beggan was presented with a scoreable free. The television camera then flashed to manager Raymond Galligan who was pleading with his hand his arms out in a cautionary stance. The instruction was clear: “Slow down.” Cavan were against the wind in the first half. They won the throw-in and denied Monaghan possession for the opening two minutes. That half was purely about staying in touch so they could ultimately chase the home outfit down. So much of that period went according to plan. Monaghan led by two points at the break despite playing with a stiff breeze. They had 12 shots to Cavan’s nine. Cavan conceded Beggan’s kickout and hit hard in their own half. Monaghan won nine Beggan restarts in that half and scored every time they were able to work a shot. The problem was that it only happened three times. Put simply, Cavan made it a running game and were better at it. At half-time, they had scored 0-4 from five kickouts won. Beggan finished with 95% retention but 14 of them were short. They scored 1-5 in total from that source and conceded a goal. Faulkner’s sensational strike stemmed from the only long kickout Monaghan lost. At the other end, Cavan scored 1-8 from their own kickout and conceded 0-1. “We felt that Monaghan probably over-passed to the D, we got a lot of turnovers in that area,” Galligan told RTÉ afterwards. “We put a big focus on continuing to run the ball, making sure we didn’t give up cheap possession. When the opportunity arose, we would take that high percentage shot rather than getting excited when it is so blustery.” Here come the big dogs It felt like only a matter of time. Sligo were Connacht minor champions in 2021. They are back-to-back Connacht U20 champions and Summerhill won the 2023 Post Primary Schools Senior A Connacht title. It was last April when Canice Mulligan announced that, “Sligo are now a f*cking big dog.” Last year those U20s stars were not available to senior boss Tony McEntee until their campaign came to an end. Sligo chairperson Sean Carroll suggested the proposal two years ago and McEntee agreed. Mulligan did not feature for the first four rounds of the league this season. Eventually he came in and on Sunday was their best player, kicking two points in an awesome midfield display. Post-match, a fair-minded McEntee explained why the U20s agreement works for them. “If I don’t see them, I can’t use them. I’m quite happy that is the case, it works perfectly fine for me in Sligo. Had it been the case last year and I brought Canice in, there would be question marks over whether he was available or not. I never had that decision to make.” The game can’t afford to let Terrace Talk fade away It has often been said. It can’t be said enough. The GAA’s approach to statistical tracking is woeful. Every time a player breaks a scoring or appearance record, this issue comes to the surface. Diligent amateur statisticians strive to shine a light on the clear metrics, but the lack of a centralised database means invariably plenty lies undetected the dark. Last week it was Kerryman scribe Damian Stack who pointed out that Terrace Talk was down. A phenomenal catalogue for anyone with a passing interest in Kerry football, it was first powered by legend Weeshie Fogarty and maintained a record of every player who donned the Green and Gold. Colm Cooper’s championship, league, U21 and minor appearances and scores? Miraculously available at the click of a button. A website like that requires hosting fees. Obviously, friends and family of Fogarty should not be expected to carry that can. A band-aid solution has been found and the site is back in action for now. Long-term it will need a concrete plan. For the sake of the game and how we honour it, such precise resources have to be protected. Green flags starting to sprout through Last year’s championship recorded the lowest average number of goals, 1.8, in 11 years. However, the 2022 championship was the highest since 1989 at 2.8 per game. Which way will 2024 go? The early signs are promising. There were 34 games in the league with three goals or more. Across the opening weekend of the championship, there was an average of 3.5 per game. Kelly off the leash Ten minutes into the Connacht SFC clash between Galway and London, the marking master was impressed. Marc Ó Sé was on co-commentary duty for GAAGO and watched the Tribesmen full-back intercept a long ball into the full-forward line. “Excellent defending! Outstanding. Read it and out in front, Sean Fitzgerald,” gushed the impressed Kerry man. It was only Fitzgerald’s second championship start. He was drafted in to tackle Aidan O’Shea in the preliminary quarter-final last year in a bid to relieve a struggling Sean Kelly of man-marking duties. The Barna clubman has been a constant in 2024. Beside him Johnny McGrath has earned rave reviews. Liam Silke and Jack Glynn are finally fit as well. What does this mean for Kelly? On Saturday he started in midfield. Under Kevin Walsh, he broke through as a wing-forward. For the past two years his storming bursts up the field have been a considerable weapon for Galway. That unrestricted edge can add a new dimension as their squad continues to get steadily healthier. Cork’s challenge ahead of Kerry clash In the bowels of Páirc Uí Chaoimh after the final round of the league against Armagh, Cork made it clear they would not be talking again until after the Limerick tie. John Cleary’s assessment of their campaign so far fixated on one specific issue. “When we went back training after the Louth and Cavan game, we decided there is no need to panic. Nothing is broken. If we could tweak a few things. We could see what was going wrong. A lot of it was shot conversion,” he told Off The Ball. Their conversion that day was over 70%. On Sunday it dropped to 53%. In every game since their opening round defeat to Donegal, Cork have had at least seven different scorers. They will create chances against Kerry. The challenge is taking them. Tipperary’s rebuild starts at the bottom The story of Sunday was Waterford’s historic first victory over neighbours Tipperary, the first since 1988. But even fairy tales include heartbreak. For Tipperary, their slide since the provincial title of 2020 has been stark. Only seven of the 20 who played in that final were involved last weekend. New manager Paul Kelly arrived to find 16 players left the group before this year. The Dubliner has previously said they started back six weeks later than he would have liked. Originally over 60 players were invited in. He handed out seven debuts against Waterford. Post-match Kelly announced a complete break. Players would be released to their clubs for the next two weeks. They will then return and attempt to construct a solid foundation with a Tailteann Cup run. Wicklow’s stalwart stands tall again The last time Wicklow played Westmeath before last weekend was 2010. It finished in a one-point win for Westmeath. A year later, Dean Healy made his debut against Kilkenny in the league. He started at wing-back versus Meath in the 2012 Leinster SFC defeat. In 2013, Healy won his first Leinster SFC tie, scoring 0-2 against Longford. In every single Leinster victory since, Healy has been a mainstay. He scored a crucial point late on against Offaly in 2018 as they ultimately prevailed in extra-time. He notched 1-1 against Wexford in 2020. He notched 0-2 against Laois in 2022. After their victory over Carlow last year, Healy brought his daughter Fiadh onto the field for the warm-down for a well-deserved celebration. The St Patricks star had played every minute of those five victories. He was awesome again on Sunday. Kevin Quinn’s second free came after a driving run and foul on Healy. His launched ball towards Jack Kirwan evaded everyone for their first goal. The midfielder chased his own short shot before John Paul Nolan punched in their second. Healy took a quick free and linked up with Tom Moran before Chris O’Brien curled over their second last point of the day. Moments later Quinn was isolated at the top of the D in urgent need of support. Healy came sprinting off his shoulder, let loose immediately with his right foot and delivered.

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Maruti Suzuki Expands Manesar Plant Capacity By 1 Lakh Units Per Year

NEW DELHI, Apr 9: Maruti Suzuki India on Tuesday said it has expanded the production capacity of its Manesar facility by one lakh units per annum. The auto major has added a vehicle assembly line to the existing Plant-A of the three manufacturing plants functioning at Manesar, in Haryana. ”The new vehicle assembly line has the capability to manufacture 1 lakh units per annum,” Maruti Suzuki India (MSI) said in a statement. With the additional assembly line, the total manufacturing capability at Manesar stands at 9 lakh vehicles per annum, it added. ”We aim to nearly double our capacity to 4 million vehicles per annum over the next 7-8 years and this capacity addition of 1 lakh vehicles per year is a step towards this goal,” MSI Managing Director & CEO Hisashi Takeuchi said. It will help the company serve its customers faster and enhance overall capability to manufacture up to 23.5 lakh units per annum, he added. The company had inaugurated the Manesar facility in February 2007 with the start of Plant A. As customer demand increased, the automaker added Plant-B in 2011 and Plant-C in 2013. MSI rolls out models like Brezza, Ertiga, XL6, Wagon R, Dzire, S-Presso, Ciaz and Celerio from the Manesar plant. (Agencies)

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New footage emerges in search for two Australian hikers still missing after Taiwan earthquake

New CCTV footage of the last sighting of two missing Australian-Singaporean hikers has emerged as the search for them continued six days after a massive earthquake hit Taiwan. Neo Siew Choo and Sim Hwee Kok have been missing since a 7.4 magnitude earthquake struck on 3 April at 7.58am. It was the largest earthquake in Taiwan in 25 years and left 13 people dead and more than 1,100 injured. The couple is among six people still unaccounted for since the earthquake with its epicentre hit Hualien. The two are believed to have begun their hike in the Taroko National Park, just minutes before the massive earthquake rocked the region. The earthquake set off significant landslides in the national park which is just 24km from the epicentre. The 14-second CCTV clip released by Taiwan’s National Fire Agency shows the couple getting off a bus at Shakadang Trail inside Taroko National Park at about 7.20am last Wednesday. Another clip recorded by a German tourist and shared with the Guardian showed the couple wearing shorts and T-shirt and walking on the trail about 500m down the path just 25 minutes before the earthquake. Special search and rescue team leader Chen Yifeng said the part of the trail was buried under huge rocks and debris after it collapsed during the temblor. “As for the four foreigners, two of them are Australian-Singaporean dual nationals, there is one Indian and one Canadian,” Hualien mayor Chen-Wei said. The bodies of three other people who were missing in the national park have been recovered. The family of the two Singaporean passport holders has given the pair’s clothing items to rescuers in Taiwan to aid search with sniffer dogs, according to the Hualien County Fire Department. Three dogs named Wilson, Hero and Fancy have been part of the rescue team since 5 April and Wilson was the first to discover two casualties.

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