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Glencadam Distillery on course to toast bicentenary year with opening of new Brechin visitor centre

Work to create a stunning new visitor centre and VIP suite at Glencadam Distillery in Brechin is well underway. The Angus distillery dates back to 1825 and is one of Scotland’s oldest. And owners Angus Dundee Distillers have released images of how the new attraction will look. Its opening is scheduled for the distillery’s 200th anniversary. The visitor centre will pay homage to the rich heritage of Glencadam and its surroundings. It will feature retail space and tasting rooms. There will also be a whisky lounge, café and function suite for corporate hospitality and private hire. Water wheel re-installed at Glencadam Distillery Architectural landmarks of the distillery are also set to be reimagined as part of the construction. Those include the distinctive pagoda roofs, reinterpreting the distillery’s ‘Doig ventilators’ as skylights for the visitor centre. In 2021, Glencadam re-installed a working water wheel in the heart of the distillery. It was restored in a nod to the original whisky-making process, which was powered by Barrie’s Burn. Immersive experience Project manager Gary Milligan said: “Much work has gone into developing plans to craft an immersive visitor experience suited to both our historic distillery and the vibrant community which surrounds it. “Blending tradition with modernity, a stone facade will wrap around the two-floor visitor centre, complementing the existing distillery buildings while adding a contemporary feel, with enhanced amenities to elevate the overall visitor experience.” Glencadam handcrafts single malt whisky in a process that’s remained unchanged for almost 200 years. An opening in summer 2025 is planned. There will be no impact on whisky production at Glencadam during the construction period. Angus Dundee Distillers posted a pre-tax profit of £31.3 million in strong financial results for 2023. Turnover rose almost 15% to more than £81m. The firm also produces Tomintoul single malt in Speyside. And in December it announced the launch of a new multi-million pound project in China. It plans to develop a distillery and visitor centre in the popular Chun’an region tourist destination of Thousand Island Lake.

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In pictures: India celebrates Holi festival of colour

Millions of people in northern and central parts of India on Monday celebrated the Hindu festival of colours, which marks the beginning of spring. Holi is celebrated at the end of winter, on the last full moon day of the Hindu luni-solar calendar month of Falgun. Hindus in the country and abroad usher in the new season with festivities including bright colours, sweets and by offering prayers to their revered gods. People drenched in water were seen smearing colours on each other’s faces, singing and dancing to the beat of drums on the streets. The festival is typically marked with either family or community-based parties but it is not uncommon for strangers to also throw colour and water balloons at each other in the street. This has led to rising concerns over women’s safety during the festival, where women have complained about being harassed and groped by men under the pretext of applying colours. A Times of India survey of 111 women in 2021 found that one in three had experienced such harassment at Holi. In addition to marking the arrival of spring, Holi also celebrates fertility, colour, love, and the triumph of good over evil. The origins of the festival can be found in various legends in Hindu mythology, one of which tells the story of a demon, Holika, and her brother, King Hiranyakashipu. The King Hiranyakashipu believed that everyone should worship him as a god but his son, Prahlada, refused to do so, opting to worship the Hindu god Vishnu instead. The king and his sister Holika plotted to kill Prahlada and lured him onto a pyre in an attempt to burn him to death. However, Prahlada survived and Holika perished in the flames instead. The night before Holi is celebrated by lighting bonfires to signify the burning of Holika and the victory of good over evil. Some Hindus who observe the festival will also smear themselves with ashes from the fire, as a symbol of purification. Other legends tell the tale of the love shared between the Hindu deities Radha and Krishna, who is frequently depicted with blue skin. The ancient legend tells how Krishna fell in love with Radha, but was concerned their difference in skin colour would keep them apart. After voicing his concerns, Krishna’s mother encouraged him to smear a brightly coloured powder on Radha’s face. In parts of the northern state of Uttar Pradesh – home to the mythology of Radha and Krisha – Holi lasts for nearly 10 days. In Varanasi in Uttar Pradesh, a two-day Masaan (crematorium) Holi on the banks of the Ganges river draws thousands of people from across the country and beyond. Here devotees and hermits smear the ashes from funeral pyres on each other’s face in celebration of death and the Hindu god, Shiva. The oldest accounts of Holi being commemorated date as far back as the 4th century. It’s celebrated around the world, although the festivities predominantly occur among communities from India and Nepal.

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Plate smashing offender put to work by Falkirk sheriff after angry domestic

Kenneth Meiehofer, 48, appeared at Falkirk Sheriff Court last Thursday having admitted threatening behaviour at an address in Braemar Drive, Falkirk on September 20 last year. The charges stated he was loitering outside the woman’s property despite being told to leave on a number of occasions and then he started smashing plates. Sheriff Christopher Shead placed Meiehofer, 156 King Street, Stenhousemuir, on a supervised community payback order for a period of three years with the condition he takes part in the Caledonian domestic abuse programme in that time. He was also ordered to complete 125 hours of unpaid work within 12 months and placed on a non harassment order not to have any contact with his former partner for two years.

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AREG Launches 2025 calendar photography competition to showcase renewable energy

Aberdeen Renewable Energy Group (AREG) is inviting budding amateur photographers to show what ;’Renewable Energy Around the Clock’ means to them for its 2025 calendar photography competition. The theme of this year’s competition was designed to demonstrate how different renewable energy sources contribute to meeting energy demands 24/7. Submissions can include images that highlight the diverse mix of renewable energy that will be needed to decarbonise our energy system by 2050. This includes wind, wave, tidal, hydrogen, solar panels, heat pumps, electric vehicles, or anything else the photographer chooses. Entries can also showcase how renewable energy technology is integrated within the Scottish landscape and local communities, including homes, public buildings, and open spaces. The top 13 images will be included in AREG’s 2025 photo calendar. In addition to having their photographs included in the calendar, each winner will receive £75 and have their images displayed at Aberdeen Science Centre. The competition is open to amateur photographers of all ages and AREG hopes that it will attract a wide range of entries from across the community, including from primary and secondary school pupils. The competition closes on Monday, September 19 and a panel of judges will select the 13 winning images. AREG chair, Jean Morrison MBE, said, “AREG’s calendar photography competition, which is now in its fourth year, is a fantastic platform to celebrate the diverse sights of renewable energy that can be seen across Scotland. This year we are encouraging photographers to consider how the varied mix of renewable energy sources available to us contribute to meeting our demand for power around the clock. “The integration of renewable energy, in all its guises, into our everyday lives is an essential step in the energy transition, and we are looking for photographs that capture this integration in a creative way. “Details of the competition have been shared with schools, colleges, and universities across the region and we hope teachers see this as a good opportunity to enhance the climate change education they already provide and to encourage families to get out and explore their local area.” Submissions can be made to calendar@aberdeenrenewables.com. Do you want to respond to this article? If so, click here to submit your thoughts and they may be published in print.

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The Supreme Court case that could sabotage hundreds of January 6 prosecutions

According to the Justice Department, Joseph Fischer texted his boss before the January 6 insurrection to tell him that he might need to post bail. The accused insurrectionist also allegedly warned that the protest at the US Capitol “might get violent,” and he allegedly wrote that “they should storm the capital and drag all the democrates [sic] into the street and have a mob trial.” When the day of the insurrection came, Fischer allegedly yelled “Charge!” before running and crashing into a line of police inside the Capitol. The Justice Department says that video footage “shows at least one police officer on the ground after [Fischer’s] assault.” Fischer was only in the Capitol for four minutes, according to the DOJ, before he was “forcibly removed.” Fischer was arrested after the FBI identified him based on a video he posted on Facebook that showed him inside the Capitol on January 6. More than three years later, however, Fischer has yet to be tried. The criminal proceeding against him has been tied up in appeals after a Trump-appointed trial judge ruled that one of the criminal laws Fischer is charged with violating must be read very narrowly. That ruling is now being reviewed by the Supreme Court, in a case called Fischer v. United States. The Supreme Court will hear this case next month. The statute at issue in Fischer provides that anyone who “obstructs, influences, or impedes any official proceeding, or attempts to do so” commits a serious federal crime and can be imprisoned for up to 20 years. (In practice, someone convicted under this statute will likely receive far less than a 20-year sentence. Federal judges normally rely on guidelines written by the US Sentencing Commission when handing down criminal penalties, rather than mechanically issuing the maximum sentence.) According to the Justice Department, “approximately 330 defendants have been charged with violating” this statute after the January 6 insurrection. One of them is Donald Trump. Many of these defendants, including Fischer and Trump, have also been charged under other criminal statutes. And the approximately 330 defendants charged with obstructing an official proceeding are only about a quarter of all January 6 defendants. So, if the Supreme Court embraces Fischer’s narrow reading of the obstruction law, that would undermine many January 6 prosecutions, but it is unlikely to sabotage the entire effort to bring the insurrectionists to justice. The overwhelming majority of judges have read the obstruction statute broadly enough to encompass the January 6 defendants. As the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit noted in its opinion saying that Fischer could be charged under this statute, several federal appellate courts “have applied the statute to reach a wide range of obstructive acts.” Similarly, of the 15 federal trial judges who’d heard January 6 cases, “no fewer than fourteen district judges in this jurisdiction have adopted the broad reading of the statute urged by the government to uphold the prosecution of defendants who allegedly participated in the Capitol riot.” Of these 15 judges, only Judge Carl Nichols, the judge who heard Fischer’s case, disagreed with this consensus view. Meanwhile, one other judge, Trump appointee Gregory Katsas, dissented from the DC Circuit’s decision. So that’s two judges against the overwhelming consensus of their colleagues. Katsas’s and Nichols’s view is hard to summarize, but they argue that the obstruction statute applies “only to acts that affect the integrity or availability of evidence,” such as if Fischer had impeded a government proceeding by destroying a document. In any event, a critical mass of the justices apparently felt that the Katsas and Nichols arguments were persuasive enough that this question should be reviewed by the Supreme Court. And so the Court will now weigh whether to accept the mainstream view of the obstruction statute or the outlier view embraced by two of Trump’s judges. To understand the two competing interpretations of the obstruction statute, it’s helpful to be familiar with its full text. It provides that: Much of the disagreement between judges who read the statute broadly and judges like Nichols and Katsas turns on the proper meaning of the word “otherwise.” As the DC Circuit held in its opinion adopting DOJ’s reading of the statute, “the word ‘otherwise’ has been given its common meaning of ‘in a different manner’ when used in similarly structured statutes.” So subsection (1) covers obstruction of a government proceeding involving documents, while subsection (2) covers obstruction of such a proceeding that is achieved through some means other than destroying or manipulating a document. Judge Katsas, meanwhile, read the word “otherwise” to mean the opposite. In his dissent, he accuses the Justice Department of “dubiously read[ing] otherwise to mean ‘in a manner different from,’ rather than ‘in a manner similar to.’” So, under Katsas’s reading of this word, subsection (2) only covers obstruction that is similar to destruction or manipulation of a document. It doesn’t cover a violent attempt to shut down a congressional proceeding by storming the Capitol. As Judge Florence Pan, the author of the DC Circuit’s Fischer decision, notes in her opinion, Katsas’s reading of this word “otherwise” is at odds with at least two dictionaries. She quotes from the Oxford English Dictionary’s definition of the word (“[i]n another way or ways; in a different manner; by other means; in other words; differently”) and from Black’s Law Dictionary’s definition (“[i]n a different manner; in another way, or in other ways”). Yet, while Katsas’s reading of the obstruction statute is counterintuitive, it is less ridiculous than it might seem. The Supreme Court has sometimes said that seemingly unambiguous statutes can be read in ways that are, well, not the same way that an ordinary English speaker would read the law’s text. In their brief, Fischer’s lawyers rely heavily on a Supreme Court decision that did so. Yates v. United States (2015) concerned a criminal statute that targets anyone who “knowingly alters, destroys, mutilates, conceals, covers up, falsifies, or makes a false entry in any record, document, or tangible object” with the intent to obstruct a federal investigation or proceeding. The defendant was a commercial fisherman who caught undersized red groupers, then ordered a crew member to toss these fish overboard “to prevent federal authorities from confirming that he had harvested undersized fish.” The question in Yates was whether these undersized fish are a “tangible object” within the meaning of the federal statute. This question divided the justices into three different camps, and not along familiar partisan lines. Justice Elena Kagan, an Obama appointee, wrote a dissent for herself and three of her Republican colleagues, arguing that the term “tangible object” should be given its ordinary meaning: “physical objects,” including fish. Meanwhile, liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote the Court’s lead opinion for herself and a bipartisan group of three other justices, arguing that the words accompanying “tangible object,” which deal with records and documents, matter. According to Ginsburg, a court should “avoid ascribing to one word a meaning so broad that it is inconsistent with its accompanying words,” and thus the term “tangible object” should be read “to refer, not to any tangible object, but specifically to the subset of tangible objects involving records and documents.” (Justice Samuel Alito wrote a brief tiebreaking opinion, which concluded that the question in Yates “is close” but that largely agreed with Ginsburg’s reading of the statute.) In any event, Fischer’s lawyers argue that his case is similar to Yates. So, just as Justice Ginsburg determined that the term “tangible object” must be read similarly to “its accompanying words,” Team Fischer argues that the phrase “otherwise obstructs, influences, or impedes any official proceeding” must be read similarly to subsection (1)’s reference to “a record, document, or other object.” Is that a persuasive argument? Well, again, the overwhelming majority of judges to consider the obstruction statute have rejected a narrow reading and have read subsection (2) in the same way an ordinary English speaker would read it. But Yates, at least, demonstrates how courts can sometimes read seemingly unambiguous statutory provisions in counterintuitive ways. And it potentially provides a roadmap for justices who want to write an opinion giving aid and comfort to the January 6 defendants. The third judge on the DC Circuit panel was also a Trump appointee, Justin Walker. Unlike Katsas, however, Walker did not attempt to read the obstruction statute to exonerate January 6 defendants. Instead, Walker focused on the statute’s language saying that it only applies to someone who “corruptly” seeks to obstruct an official proceeding. Walker worried that, if the word “corruptly” were read too broadly, then the obstruction statute could potentially be read to encompass “lawful attempts to ‘influence’ congressional proceedings,” such as “protests or lobbying.” To prevent this outcome, Walker argued that the word “corruptly” should be defined to mean that a defendant acted “with an intent to procure an unlawful benefit either for himself or for some other person.” This interpretation should not hinder any January 6 prosecutions as the whole point of the January 6 insurrection was to procure an unlawful benefit for Donald Trump: a second presidential term. But it is possible that some of the justices will share Walker’s concern that the obstruction statute can be read too broadly and interpret the word “corruptly” to eliminate this problem.

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Dear Abby: As menopause sets in, I grieve what could have been

DEAR ABBY: I am 34 and recently found out I have started menopause. I knew it might come early for me because most of the women in my family began in their 30s and were done by 50. I have no biological children and now probably never will. I guess I waited too long for the right time, the right person, etc. I was always careful to use birth control when I became sexually active and never left it up to my partner. I am now having a hard time coping with this feeling of loss. I know I shouldn’t be grieving something I never had, but I find myself tearing up thinking about it. I’m angry at myself for missing out on it. I have been married to a wonderful man for almost two years, but we have been together for 10. I wanted to be married and financially stable before having children. I feel like I’m being punished. My poor husband takes the brunt of my frustrations and anger, which isn’t fair, and I apologize when it happens, but I find myself slowly drifting into isolation because of it. I don’t know what to do anymore. I’m sad, angry, frustrated and empty. I wish I had an answer or anyone who understands to just hear me. Any advice? — GRIEVING IN OREGON DEAR GRIEVING: Your feelings are understandable. It’s time to seek counseling for help to stop blaming yourself or your husband and cope with your feelings of sadness, anger and frustration. Once that is done, it may be time to consider your options for fulfilling your maternal instincts. These include fostering, adoption, surrogacy and volunteer mentoring. Please consider them. DEAR ABBY: Three years ago, I discovered I was being excluded by my co-workers. I have tried to not let it bother me, but it’s starting to wear me down emotionally. I work in a dental office with a staff of seven women. I have worked with two of them for almost 20 years, and I always thought we had a friendship because we would go to lunch together and occasionally do things outside of work. Three years ago, I learned they have a group chat with two of the other women and have gotten together outside of work and didn’t include me. What bothers me most is they laugh and talk in front of me about the funny memes and videos they send each other. I’m tired of being excluded, and I don’t understand why they have done it. We all get along, so I’m not sure why this is happening. Any advice on what I should say or do? — APART IN ILLINOIS DEAR APART: Folks are entitled to socialize (or not) with anyone they would like after work. However, to treat you the way they have been seems insensitive, bordering on rude, and you have every right to say so the next time it happens. It may lead to a “difficult” discussion, but you have a right to tell them how it affects you. Do not depend upon your co-workers to be personal friends, which may not be possible. I encourage you to cultivate social relationships outside the office from now on. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Good advice for everyone — teens to seniors — is in “The Anger in All of Us and How to Deal With It.” To order, send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $8 (U.S. funds), to: Dear Abby, Anger Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)

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Minister admits nuclear plans should have been set out ‘years ago’

The Government should have set out plans for the future of Britain’s nuclear industry “years ago”, the minister in charge of the sector has said. The Prime Minister is due to declare a “critical national endeavour” to secure the nuclear industry’s future on a visit to Barrow-in-Furness on Monday. Number 10 hopes the money will create more than 8,000 career opportunities to help the sector fill 40,000 new roles by the end of the decade. But speaking to Times Radio earlier on Monday, nuclear minister Andrew Bowie, whose party has been in power since 2010, acknowledged plans for the industry were long overdue. He said: “I make no bones about it, we should have done this years ago. We are running to catch up. “But we have just this year delivered our civil nuclear road map, we have announced our intention to build a third gigawatt project, we are investing £350 million in new nuclear power to ease Vladimir Putin out of the nuclear fuels market, we are actually committed to delivering small modular reactors through our competition which will conclude this year. “But of course this should have been done years ago, which is why we are having to take the action in the way that we are right now.” Firms including BAE Systems, Rolls-Royce, EDF and Babcock are partnering with the Government to invest around £763 million in skills, jobs and education for the defence and civil nuclear industries. Rishi Sunak is also set to announce a new fund backed by £20 million of public money to support growth in Barrow-in-Furness, the Cumbrian town that is home to Britain’s nuclear submarine programme. He will commit to a further £180 million a year over the next decade, which Downing Street says would provide grants to local organisations and improvements to transport and health outcomes in the area. Ahead of his visit to Barrow-in-Furness, Mr Sunak said: “Safeguarding the future of our nuclear deterrent and nuclear energy industry is a critical national endeavour. “In a more dangerous and contested world, the UK’s continuous at-sea nuclear deterrent is more vital than ever. And nuclear delivers cheaper, cleaner home-grown energy for consumers. “That’s why we are investing in Barrow, the home of UK submarines, and in the jobs and skills of the future in the thriving British nuclear industry. “Today we usher in the next generation of our nuclear enterprise, which will keep us safe, keep our energy secure, and keep our bills down for good.” The Defence Nuclear Enterprise Command Paper, which the Government says will set out for the first time the full breadth of activity aimed at sustaining and modernising Britain’s continuous at-sea nuclear deterrent, will also be laid in Parliament on Monday. The announcement follows weeks of criticism over the Government’s resistance to calls for an increase in defence spending amid concerns about the global risk posed by countries like Russia and China. In a visible sign of unease within the Tory ranks, Foreign Office minister Anne-Marie Trevelyan and security minister Tom Tugendhat earlier this month said a “much greater pace” of investment was needed, while Defence Secretary Grant Shapps called for military spending to rise to 3% of GDP. Mr Sunak has said the Government has already announced the largest sustained increase in defence spending since the Cold War and “recently topped up with billions of pounds to strengthen our nuclear enterprise and rebuild stockpiles”. John Healey, Labour’s shadow defence secretary, welcomed the Government’s commitment but said Labour had “long argued” for ministers to secure jobs in Barrow and that Britain would be “better defended” under his party. But SNP defence spokesperson Martin Docherty-Hughes MP condemned the plans to “waste another £200 million” on nuclear and accused both main parties of focusing on “the wrong priorities”. “It is grotesque to throw another £200 million down the drain when the Tories and Labour Party both claim there is no money to improve our NHS, to help families with the cost of living or to properly invest in our green energy future,” he said.

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Pub in the Park: Tom Kerridge returns with food and music festival

A raft of celebrity chefs are again lined up to appear at Pub in the Park, Tom Kerridge’s annual food and music festival that tours the Home Counties, the Standard can reveal. Musical acts in 2024 include Busted, Sam Ryder, Van Morrison, Paloma Faith, and Olly Murs, each of whom will perform while chefs turn out various small plates. The festival will take place over four weekends and at different locations between May and September, with a changing line-up of star chefs. The likes of Angela Hartnett from Murano, Tommy Banks of the Black Swan, and Jack Blumenthal, son of Heston, are among the headliners. Pub in the Park will kick off at Marlow in May, before popping up in Chiswick, Reigate, and St Albans. New this year are “pub specials”, with each restaurant serving an “elevated” dish alongside classics. Menu highlights in Marlow will be Kerridge’s own two Michelin-star Hand & Flowers, while Hartnett will be cooking lamb Bolognese, tomato and mozzarella arancini, and chicken Milanese. Debutants in 2024 are Banks’ Yorkshire pub, The Abbey Inn, which will be bringing lamb kofta flatbreads and a celeriac and truffle pie, and Sabrina Gidda and Thom Bateman’s restaurant concept Collision Course, bringing masala ox cheek mac and cheese and spicy pork sandos. Pub in the Park will take place between May 16-19 in Marlow, June 28-30 in Chiswick, July 12-14 in Reigate, and September 6-8 in St Albans. Tickets are on sale now at tickets.pubintheparkuk.com

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Molly-Mae Hague ignores backlash as she jumps back on private jet after for ‘4 months in making

Molly-Mae Hague has ignored recent backlash and jumped back on a private jet as part of a surprise she says was ‘four months in the making’. Last week, the influencer was seen travelling in style as she enjoyed a solo trip to a retreat in Ibiza. She had treated herself to a well-being retreat at an exclusive villa on the Balearic Island, reportedly costing £120k-a-week. Molly-Mae, who also shared a vlog of her trip to her YouTube channel, was seen spending her days taking in the scenery on long hikes and enjoying Pilates classes by the pool. She was joined by a large group of women on the retreat, who she said she made friends with “instantly” and said how welcomed they made her feel as she was the only person there solo. But she did open up about something she struggled with during the stay – the food – as the 24-year-old said how she’d been “embarrassed” to ask the chef to make her specific meals. READ MORE: Ellie Leach post cryptic ‘struggling’ message days after BBC Strictly Come Dancing reunion Join our WhatsApp Top Stories and Breaking News group by clicking this link But after returning to the UK, and reuniting with her fiancé Tommy Fury and their daughter Bambi, it wasn’t long before Molly-Mae was jetting off again after surprising her best friend Tayla-Blue Watts with a trip to Courchevel, France, for her 30th birthday. However, what Tayla didn’t know was that it wasn’t just her and Molly-Mae taking the trip as Tommy, Molly’s sister Zoe and fellow influencer Perrie Sian were also among the group to be joining the celebrations. The birthday surprise was four months in the making and saw Molly-Mae pull out all the stops to secretly get her group of close friends onto the flight without the birthday girl knowing. The former Love Island star shared a video of the moment she was surprised by them on the private jet. “4 months in the making. She thought it was just us going away…” Molly-Mae explained. “But all of her favourite people were waiting for her,” she added with a crying face emoji and a white love heart. The group enjoyed a tasty-looking cake high up in the clouds, before tucking into another once they got to their location, with the cake iced with the words “RIP 20s”. And after arriving in style, they marked their first night away with a stunning firework display above the snow-covered slopes which they watched seemingly from their chalets. It comes after the pictures of her previous journey to Ibiza on a private jet didn’t impress everyone who felt the need to send Molly-Mae negative messages for seemingly flaunting her wealth on a ‘short trip’.

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Ministry: 1 Bus Run Cancelled On Monday

Ministry: 1 Bus Run Cancelled On Monday The Ministry released the list of bus cancellations for this morning [March 25], with the list indicating that there is one bus run cancelled so far today. Category: All

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