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Peruvian psychologist dies by euthanasia after fighting for years in courts for ‘death with dignity’

“Ana’s struggle for her right to die with dignity has helped to educate thousands of Peruvians about this right and the importance of defending it,” her lawyer, Josefina Miro Quesada, said in a statement. “Her struggle transcended our nation’s borders.” Estrada, 47, suffered from polymyositis, a disease that wastes away muscles and has no cure. She began to present the first symptoms as a teenager and started to use a wheelchair at the age of 20 because she had lost the strength to walk. Despite these obstacles Estrada obtained a psychology degree and became a therapist. She earned enough money to buy her own apartment and became independent from her parents. By 2017 however, Estrada’s condition worsened and she could no longer get up from her bed. She had difficulty breathing and survived pneumonia. And even though she could not type, Estrada used transcription software to produce a blog called “Ana for a death with dignity,” where she discussed her struggles and her decision to seek euthanasia. “I am no longer free,” she said in an interview with the Associated Press in 2018. “I am not the same person I was before.”

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What is the Rwanda scheme? Your questions answered

What is the Rwanda scheme? Ministers believe the prospect of being sent to Rwanda will deter illegal migrants from crossing the Channel. The Government is gambling that the first flights to East Africa will have a stark impact on Channel arrivals, and demonstrate to voters that the problem is finally in hand. Is it ready to launch? The Government is confident. It has had more than two years to work on its preparations, and any kind of operational glitch would be highly damaging. Last month sources said 100 to 150 migrants had already been identified for the first tranche of removals. Who will be sent to Rwanda? Under two recent Acts of Parliament the Government has powers to disregard asylum applications from those who arrive in the UK by ‘irregular’ routes such as by small boat. Measures have also been taken to severely restrict migrants’ access to legal appeals. However, some limited appeal rights are retained. Will there be legal action? Probably. Migrants who are told they are facing removal to Rwanda are expected to lodge individual appeals. Pro-migrant charity Care4Calais said last week it planned to initiate challenges as quickly as possible. But the PM revealed yesterday that 25 courtrooms and 150 judges have been earmarked to hear such cases promptly, in a bid to avoid delaying flights. How will migrants be flown out? Rishi Sunak said an airfield was on standby to handle the removals. A Ministry of Defence base – Boscombe Down near Salisbury, Wilts – was used for the aborted removals flight in June 2022 and the Home Office has been carrying out rehearsals there in recent months. It is understood to have been in negotiations with several private charter companies. Previously, firms involved in removals flights have pulled out after being targeted by Left-wing groups. It is understood the RAF is on stand-by to step in. What happens when they arrive in Rwanda? They will claim asylum under Rwandan law and be provided with free housing, healthcare, education and other support. A range of safeguards prevent any migrant who is flown to Rwanda from Britain from being sent to any other country, apart from back to the UK if necessary. How much will it cost? The Government will pay Rwanda £370 million under the deal, plus a further £120 million once the first 300 migrants have been sent to Kigali. On top, there will be a cost of £20,000 per individual removed and £150,874 per head in ‘processing and operational costs’.

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The government is ready to take on lawyers and campaign groups over the Rwanda plan, Rishi Sunak…

Ministers are braced to take on lawyers and campaign groups who try to stop asylum seekers being sent to Rwanda. Rishi Sunak stressed the Home Office is ‘ready’ to carry out the ‘complex operational endeavour’, after previously being stymied in the courts and the House of Lords. He told a press conference yesterday that the Government had lined up 150 judges across 25 courtrooms to ‘deal with any legal cases quickly and decisively’. It is expected that passengers on board the first flights to take off for Kigali will be those with the weakest arguments against removal from the UK. Rishi Sunak stressed the Home Office is ‘ready’ to carry out the ‘complex operational endeavour’ Charities have major concerns about vulnerable asylum seekers deciding to ‘disengage’ (File Image) Number 10 previously pledged to make cases ‘watertight’ against individuals it planned to send to Rwanda in an effort to blunt the efforts of human rights lawyers. READ MORE: Rishi Sunak vows flights to Rwanda WILL take off by July as Labour forces votes to carry on late into the night Advertisement The road to Rwanda has been beset by problems, not least in the courts. In June 2022, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) in Strasbourg ordered a last-minute grounding of the first plane due to take migrants to Rwanda, despite the UK’s Supreme Court ruling the flight could go ahead. There were further setbacks the following summer, when the UK’s Court of Appeal ruled the plans were unlawful and could breach human rights in a case brought by charity Asylum Aid. Then-home secretary Suella Braverman described moves to block the policy as ‘phoney humanitarianism’. And last November, the UK’s Supreme Court also found that the Rwanda plan was unlawful, forcing Mr Sunak to bring in new legislation to salvage it. There remain fears that the ECHR could again issue a ruling to halt removals of migrants – but the Prime Minister said the Government has ‘put beyond all doubt that ministers can disregard these injunctions’. ‘No foreign court will stop us from getting flights off,’ he added. Mr Sunak spoke yesterday about his plans for a ‘regular rhythm of multiple flights every month’, suggesting a confidence that the scheme will not be derailed once it gets going. Yet the Home Office remains concerned about the prospect of some migrants going missing if they fear being sent to the central African country. Last November, the UK’s Supreme Court also found that the Rwanda plan was unlawful. Pictured, staff board a plan planned to be the first to transport migrants to Rwanda in 2022 A leaked Home Office document seen by The Mail on Sunday warned of ‘issues across the bail process which will increase absconcion and hamper tracing efforts’. Marked ‘Official – Sensitive’ and dating from last year, it warned that even if a migrant was bailed to an address, ‘operational pressures, and non-compliant behaviour’ could limit the information collected on individuals. Charities also have major concerns about vulnerable asylum seekers deciding to ‘disengage’. Ann Salter, from the Freedom from Torture organisation, said: ‘Tragically, it’s highly likely that we’ll hear of people taking their own lives to avoid being sped onto a plane. ‘We’re also concerned that people will disengage with support systems because they’re so frightened. ‘This will make them vulnerable to exploitation and abuse, at risk of destitution and having no access to health care and other vital services.’ It was reported last week that lawyers acting on behalf of migrants due for removal to Rwanda will cite mental and physical health grounds in an effort to prevent them being placed on flights. Mr Sunak refused to be drawn on the details of operation, only that he expected the flights to begin in earnest within ten to 12 weeks. He said: ‘I’m not going to outline now exactly what will happen when, and there are good operational reasons for this. ‘There is a loud minority who will do anything to disrupt our plan, so we will not be giving away sensitive operational detail which could hinder all the progress made to date.’ Former UKIP leader Nigel Farage said he believed human rights laws would scupper plans to send asylum seekers to Rwanda. The honorary president of Reform UK told GB News: ‘While it’s there, there will be legal cases taken and British judges will find in favour of the legislation. ‘I promise you, not a single person is going to Rwanda. This is a complete charade. And the tougher he [Mr Sunak] talks, the more he raises the rhetoric, the more public disappointment there’ll be.

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Now campaigner threatened with arrest for being ‘openly Jewish’ says he has more than 1,500…

More than 1,500 protesters are set to descend on a pro-Palestinian march this weekend to press Scotland Yard to keep the streets safe for Jewish people. The Met faces potential clashes after an anti-Semitism campaigner threatened with arrest for being ‘openly Jewish’ launched the ‘walk together’ campaign. Gideon Falter is encouraging people to follow the route of a pro-Palestinian march in London to ‘force the police to make sure that these things are safe for Jewish people’. Rishi Sunak piled pressure on Met commissioner Sir Mark Rowley yesterday, saying the force must rebuild the trust of the Jewish community. The Prime Minister said he shared the public’s fury after Mr Falter, chief executive of the Campaign Against Antisemitism, was threatened with arrest by a Met officer who described him as ‘openly Jewish’ and said his presence was antagonising pro-Palestine demonstrators. The Met faces potential clashes after an anti-Semitism campaigner (pictured) threatened with arrest for being ‘openly Jewish’ launched the ‘walk together’ campaign Gideon Falter (pictured) is encouraging people to follow the route of a pro-Palestinian march in London to ‘force the police to make sure that these things are safe for Jewish people’ Rishi Sunak piled pressure on Met commissioner Sir Mark Rowley yesterday, saying the force must rebuild the trust of the Jewish community Since the incident on April 13, almost 9,000 people have signed a petition calling for the resignation of Britain’s top police officer. READ MORE: ‘Openly Jewish’ charity chief says Met boss Mark Rowley has ‘failed abjectly’ to stand up for Jews – as he faces showdown with London Mayor amid calls to quit over pro-Palestine march vid Advertisement Mr Sunak said: ‘I share the shock and the anger that many are feeling when they saw the clips over the weekend. And you know what I would say about Mark Rowley and the police, they do have a difficult job, of course I appreciate that. ‘But what happened was clearly wrong. And it’s right that they’ve apologised for that. ‘And yes, I do have confidence in him, but that’s on the basis that he works to rebuild the confidence and trust of not just the Jewish community, but the wider public, particularly people in London but more broadly.’ Sir Mark has come under sustained criticism from senior figures, including former home secretary Suella Braverman who told Radio 4 yesterday: ‘The police have chosen a side.’ Deputy Foreign Secretary Andrew Mitchell told Sky News: ‘There are strategic issues… how we ensure that Jewish people, people of any faith at all, can go about their business.’ Shadow Home Secretary Yvette Cooper said the incident ‘clearly wasn’t handled properly … but the police work immensely hard every single day to keep us safe’. Mr Sunak said: ‘I share the shock and the anger that many are feeling when they saw the clips over the weekend. And you know what I would say about Mark Rowley and the police, they do have a difficult job, of course I appreciate that’ (pictured: Sir Mark Rowley in November 2023) Sir Mark has come under sustained criticism from senior figures, including former home secretary Suella Braverman Shadow Home Secretary Yvette Cooper said the incident ‘clearly wasn’t handled properly … but the police work immensely hard every single day to keep us safe’ Yesterday Sir Mark faced a series of meetings with Home Secretary James Cleverly and the Mayor of London Sadiq Khan. He also met representatives of Jewish groups including the Community Security Trust and London Jewish Forum. They said in a joint statement: ‘We urge the police and Government to work together to find ways to limit the impact (of demonstrations) through reducing the number of protests, moving them to less disruptive locations and acting firmly and consistently whenever offences are committed.’ Mr Khan said his meeting had led to a frank and constructive discussion. Last night more than 1,600 people had signed an online invite for Mr Falter’s ‘walk together’ initiative on Saturday.

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Surge in Channel crossings as one in five small boats migrants are now from Vietnam, figures show

A ten-fold increase in Vietnamese migrants has driven a surge in illegal Channel crossings this year, the Government has revealed. Some 6,265 people have arrived in Britain by dinghy since January, the Home Office said yesterday – a 24 per cent rise on the same period of 2023. And migrants from Vietnam made up one in five of the arrivals (1,266), up from just 3 per cent (125) a year earlier. ‘This represents a ten-fold year-on-year increase in Vietnamese arrivals,’ the Home Office said. Afghans (1,216) accounted for another fifth of the total, marginally up from 1,098, while there were 3,783 from the rest of the world – similar to the 3,826 recorded a year earlier. The Prime Minister acknowledged the ‘changing tactics’ of the ‘sophisticated’ people-smuggling gangs in his press conference on the Rwanda deportation scheme yesterday No arrivals have been detected in the past week, since the record 534 who came ashore in ten boats on April 15. However the figures are a major blow to Rishi Sunak’s crucial pledge to ‘stop the boats’, reversing the progress made in 2023 when numbers fell by 36 per cent. The Prime Minister acknowledged the ‘changing tactics’ of the ‘sophisticated’ people-smuggling gangs in his press conference on the Rwanda deportation scheme yesterday morning. ‘As well as piling twice as many people into small dinghies and increasing violence against French police, they have shifted their attentions towards vulnerable Vietnamese migrants,’ he told reporters. ‘Vietnamese arrivals have increased ten-fold and account for almost all of the increase in small-boat numbers we have seen this year.’ But he said work was already under way to tackle the trend, including an agreement with French president Emmanuel Macron on ‘closing loopholes to enter Europe in the first place’. An agreement has also been reached with Vietnam on closer working, and last week Vietnamese officials visited the Western Jet Foil and Manston asylum processing centres in Kent to observe Border Force operations. Some 6,265 people have arrived in Britain by dinghy since January, the Home Office said yesterday – a 24 per cent rise on the same period of 2023 (File Image) Officials believe a new migrant worker visa agreement intended to fill job vacancies in Hungary has made it easier for Vietnamese migrants to legally get into Europe, from where they can travel on to France then pay criminal gangs to get into the UK. The majority are female, in contrast to illegal arrivals from other countries, and are thought to largely end up working in nail bars or as sex workers. Despite the surge in small-boat crossings, the Home Office statistics published yesterday did show some progress in tackling the backlog of asylum claims and returning people. Some 129,407 decisions were made in the 12 months to April 14, the highest number in more than 20 years, with 61 per cent granted leave to remain. The ‘work in progress’ backlog has fallen by 39 per cent from 135,959 at the end of 2022 to 83,154 last week. Despite the surge in small-boat crossings, the Home Office statistics published yesterday did show some progress in tackling the backlog of asylum claims (File Image) And the number of hotels used to accommodate migrants now stands at 267, down from 398 last autumn. The number of migrants sent home increased by 55 per cent to reach 26,027 in the 12 months to the end of March, of whom 5,976 were Albanian. Liberal Democrat home affairs spokesman Alistair Carmichael said: ‘These figures lay bare the Conservative Party’s empty rhetoric on this issue. This government-by-press-release has proven totally ineffective. Instead of focusing on the backlog, the Prime Minister is focused on sound bites. ‘Sunak needs to get a grip, stop cowering to the Right wing of his party and put forward practical solutions to stop the dangerous Channel crossings.’ Q&A What is the Rwanda scheme? Ministers believe the prospect of being sent to Rwanda will deter illegal migrants from crossing the Channel. The Government is gambling that the first flights to East Africa will have a stark impact on Channel arrivals, and demonstrate to voters that the problem is finally in hand. Is it ready to launch? The Government is confident. It has had more than two years to work on its preparations, and any kind of operational glitch would be highly damaging. Last month sources said 100 to 150 migrants had already been identified for the first tranche of removals. Who will be sent to Rwanda? Under two recent Acts of Parliament the Government has powers to disregard asylum applications from those who arrive in the UK by ‘irregular’ routes such as by small boat. Measures have also been taken to severely restrict migrants’ access to legal appeals. However, some limited appeal rights are retained. Will there be legal action? Probably. Migrants who are told they are facing removal to Rwanda are expected to lodge individual appeals. Pro-migrant charity Care4Calais said last week it planned to initiate challenges as quickly as possible. But the PM revealed yesterday that 25 courtrooms and 150 judges have been earmarked to hear such cases promptly, in a bid to avoid delaying flights. How will migrants be flown out? Rishi Sunak said an airfield was on standby to handle the removals. A Ministry of Defence base – Boscombe Down near Salisbury, Wilts – was used for the aborted removals flight in June 2022 and the Home Office has been carrying out rehearsals there in recent months. It is understood to have been in negotiations with several private charter companies. Previously, firms involved in removals flights have pulled out after being targeted by Left-wing groups. It is understood the RAF is on stand-by to step in. What happens when they arrive in Rwanda? They will claim asylum under Rwandan law and be provided with free housing, healthcare, education and other support. A range of safeguards prevent any migrant who is flown to Rwanda from Britain from being sent to any other country, apart from back to the UK if necessary. How much will it cost? The Government will pay Rwanda £370 million under the deal, plus a further £120 million once the first 300 migrants have been sent to Kigali. On top, there will be a cost of £20,000 per individual removed and £150,874 per head in ‘processing and operational costs’.

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Family of young person at the centre of Huw Edwards BBC scandal vow ‘this is not the end’ as they…

The family of the young person at the heart of the Huw Edwards scandal have sworn it is ‘not the end’ and they will keep fighting for answers despite his resignation. Britain’s most famous newsreader, 62, has been off air since last July after he was accused of paying a young person for sexually explicit images. Today, it was announced he resigned from his £439,000-a-year job because of ‘medical advice’ from his doctors. There was no mention of allegations he sent more than £35,000 to a teenager in return for sexually explicit photographs. The parents of the young person involved have now spoken out about their worries over what his resignation means in the search for answers. Speaking to The Sun, the teenager’s mother said: ‘If Huw has been found to have done something wrong no action can be taken against him. My heart is broken.’ Britain’s most famous newsreader, 62, has been off air since last July after he was accused of paying a young person for sexually explicit images. Pictured on BBC News at 10 Huw Edwards was last seen on the screen on July 5 last year when he covered King Charles’ visit to Scotland (pictured). Nine months on he has left the BBC on health grounds In a statement released by Mr Edward’s wife Vicky Flind last year, she said that he was receiving in-patient hospital care following the claims first reported in The Sun that he paid a teenager for explicit photographs A mocked up version of a reported Instagram message exchange between the BBC star and a teenager The mother said she feels that the ‘traumatic time’ the family have gone through for nearly a year ‘hasn’t been resolved’ by the move. She demanded closure and called for the BBC to answer the family’s ‘many’ questions as she vowed ‘this is not the end for us’. Speaking out previously, she said she wanted the BBC to be ‘properly investigated, whatever that takes’. Today, she begged the corporation to answer her question as to whether the Welsh presenter has cooperated in their internal probe. Speaking to The Sun following his resignation, she said ‘we feared this would happen’. She told the newspaper: ‘He’s walked away but we are still living through this nightmare.’ And the teenager’s step-father, who made the original complaint, said he is ‘furious’. The family say they were told the News at Ten presenter didn’t receive a pay-off but the matter is now considered to be closed. He told the newspaper that they have been left with ‘no closure and no answers’ and they ‘aren’t accepting that’. READ MORE – Huw Edwards resigns from £439,000-a-year BBC News at Ten role on ‘medical advice’ nine months after he was suspended over sex pics scandal Advertisement In February, the BBC apologised to the young person’s family, who’d complained about Edwards two months before he was suspended, acknowledging that there had been ‘shortcomings’ in the way it had dealt with the case as it reviewed its complaints procedures. The details of the vulnerable teenager alleged to be addicted to crack appeared in The Sun. After that three more people made allegations against the broadcaster. The well-known presenter allegedly began paying the teenager and sent them the money which they used to fund a drug addiction. The child’s mother, who first made the shocking allegations in May last year, told the Sun she felt ‘sick’ whenever she sees the man on TV. The star was said to have requested ‘performances’ from the individual, who told their mother they would then ‘get their bits out’. A formal complaint was made to the BBC by the family. The young person at the centre of the controversy said via a lawyer, according to the BBC, that nothing inappropriate or unlawful happened with the unnamed presenter. However, their mother told The Sun they stood by the claims. A bombshell second claim then emerged when the same presenter was accused of sending abusive and menacing messages to a person in their 20s. The second individual claimed to have been contacted anonymously by the male presenter on a dating app. They claim they were put under pressure to meet with the star but never did, the BBC reported. When they hinted online that they might name them, they alleged they were sent abusive messages that were filled with expletives. The BBC said the young person felt ‘threatened’ by the messages and ‘remains scared’. Mr Edwards enjoys a coffee and a pastry with his dog in April last year near his south London home Broadcasting executive Stewart Purvis CBE (above) said there is ‘relief across the BBC’ that the ‘extraordinarily damaging saga’ has been resolved This comes after broadcasting executive Stewart Purvis CBE said there is ‘relief across the BBC’ that the ‘extraordinarily damaging saga’ has been resolved. He added that Edwards having ‘walked from the BBC’ will be viewed as ‘quite a successful outcome’ for the corporation. Speaking to BBC News this afternoon, Mr Purvis said: ‘I’m not surprised that the BBC has had to come to some conclusion on this, obviously they’re saying that it’s at the request of Huw Edwards, but there will be relief across the BBC that this situation has been resolved. ‘Because frankly it had become embarrassing for the BBC quite how long it was taking to sort it out. ‘The Director General Tim Davie, appearing before a committee in Parliament said that there were four factors. There was the detail of the allegations themselves, there was what it called the privacy issues, there was duty of care which is the BBC’s responsibility to employee Huw Edwards and also the legitimate public interest. ‘They’ve been trying to weigh up all those points and this is the outcome.’ He added: ‘I think the questions from outside will be, is there some sort of financial settlement or not? Has Huw Edwards said “look I’ll resign, I’ll go” or has there been some kind of negotiation about the terms of him going – we’re certainly not being told that now, and probably never be told that unless it leaks.’ READ MORE – Moment newsreader on BBC News Channel reports Huw Edwards had resigned nine months after he was suspended following sex pics scandal Advertisement The TV executive continued: ‘Looking at the high, high profile of Huw Edwards, looking at all the other knock-on issues, for instance, who is going to present the BBC’s election night programme? I think we could have assumed it was not going to be Huw Edwards. ‘But the BBC I’m sure would have wanted to get on and announce who is so they had to, in a sense, resolve the Huw Edwards issue first. That’s just one of the extra questions they’ve had. ‘First of all, by and large, the most important issue was making the right judgement about what Huw Edwards did and working out what the right response to that is and what kind of precedent it might set. ‘Because there are all sorts of issues arising from whether an offence had been committed, whether something inappropriate has been committed, whether there had been a breach of contract. ‘All those issues had to be weighed up and if the solution at the end of the day is that Huw Edwards walked from the BBC, then the BBC would see that as quite a successful outcome for what has been an extraordinarily damaging saga for the BBC. ‘You can’t have the fact one of the most trusted men in Britain turn out really to not be worthy of that trust.’ His words come after the BBC said today that its star anchor, who broke the news of Queen Elizabeth II ‘s death and presented coverage of most major national events including elections and the Coronation, left the corporation on health grounds. A BBC spokesman said earlier today: ‘Huw Edwards has today resigned and left the BBC. After 40 years of service, Huw has explained that his decision was made on the basis of medical advice from his doctors. The broadcaster, 62, announced that the Queen had died in September 2022 The Mail understands the 62-year-old newsreader has taken sanctuary in his beloved Wales and is being comforted in Carmarthenshire by his mother Aerona (pictured) ‘The BBC has accepted his resignation which it believes will allow all parties to move forward’. Edwards has never publicly commented in the nine months since he was suspended. MailOnline understands he received no pay off from the BBC – but had been paid his £439,000-a-year salary while he was suspended. He leaves with immediate effect – but is not known if the BBC’s internal workplace investigation into whether Edwards brought the broadcaster into disrepute was completed. READ MORE – The runners and riders who could replace Huw Edwards as BBC News at Ten presenter – with Clive Myrie, Sophie Raworth and Reeta Chakrabarti all in the race for the role Advertisement Huw was named by his own wife as the BBC star accused of paying £35,000 to a vulnerable teenager in return for explicit photographs – minutes after Scotland Yard dropped their probe into the allegations last year. There had been a frenzy of speculation about the identity of the star. Gary Lineker and Jeremy Vine had felt obliged to deny that they were the man in question. Vicky Flind then issued the shock statement and revealed her husband, who was last on screen on July 5 last year during the King’s visit to Scotland, was ‘suffering from serious mental health issues’ following the claims that emerged in The Sun the following day. By then, the identity of the unnamed BBC presenter had inspired such a firestorm of speculation that Gary Lineker and Jeremy Vine felt obliged to deny that they were the man in question. The star was branded a ‘complete hypocrite’ for allegedly breaking Covid rules to meet a 23-year-old stranger from a dating site. He was accused of defying the third national lockdown for an encounter with a young person in 2021 while the BBC was at the same time telling millions of people to follow the rules as part of its coverage of the pandemic. The third person said they met up after months of interactions, and that the presenter sent them £650 in cash and asked them for a picture, The Sun reported. They claimed the presenter travelled into a different county to meet them at their flat in February 2021 when rules included a stay at home order and mixing only between household bubbles. The person claimed at the meeting, which came months after they started talking on the dating site in November 2020, ‘he came round for an hour…. We just chatted. He was obsessed with me making him a cup of tea.’ The newsreader has been off air since last July after reports claiming he paid a young person for sexually explicit images The Mail revealed this month that Huw has taken sanctuary in his beloved Wales and is being comforted in Carmarthenshire by his mother Aerona. Huw was the corporation’s highest paid newsreader, with a pay bracket of £435,000 – £439,999 in the year 2022/2023, according to the corporation’s most recent annual report. This was up from £410,000 – £414,000 the year before, putting him fourth on the 2022/23 list. TV executive and former Editor-in-Chief and Chief Executive of ITN, Stewart Purvis, said today: ‘Huw Edwards has been paid half a million pounds a year to do nothing, I don’t think that situation could have continued any longer. ‘They’re saying that it’s at the request of Huw Edwards but there will be relief across the BBC that this situation has been resolved because frankly it has become embarrassing for the BBC quite how long it was taking to sort it out. He continued: ‘Looking at the high, high profile of Huw Edwards, looking at all the other knock-on issues, for instance, who is going to present the BBC’s election night programme?’. He said Huw’s departure today was a ‘successful outcome for what has been an extraordinarily damaging saga for the BBC. ‘You can’t have the fact one of the most trusted men in Britain turns out really to not be worthy of that trust.’ Huw’s exit came as the BBC has a busy year of news which includes several elections, huge sporting events and the ongoing wars in Gaza and Ukraine. Incoming BBC chairman Samir Shah, made this point to MPs ahead of his appointment last year. He said: ‘Next year is likely to be election year. It is BBC journalism’s World Cup . . . We need to be match fit. We need to have figured out everything from studio debates to allocation of airtime.’ Edwards, who was born in Bridgend and brought up in Llangennech, Carmarthenshire, joined the BBC as a trainee in 1984. Pictured on the six o’clock news in 1999 Clive Myrie, 59, has been tipped as the news presenter who could front the BBC’s election coverage and succeed Edwards as the News at Ten anchor. Sophie Raworth, Laura Kuenssberg and Nick Robinson are also in contention to host election night. He was accused of sending cash to a teenager in return for sexual photographs over three years. The teen is alleged to have use it to fund a crack cocaine habit. The Metropolitan Police and South Wales Police both said that no criminal offence had been committed by the presenter in this case. Edwards, who until today was still reportedly receiving his full £439,000 salary, had seemed more accomplished than ever in the months preceding his suspension, earning lavish plaudits for his commentary on Queen Elizabeth’s funeral. There were even calls for him to be knighted. Declaring that the idea ’embarrassed’ him, Edwards prepared with trademark rigour for his role leading the BBC’s coronation coverage. ‘I’d be lying if I said I didn’t practise in my own mind,’ he explained. ‘I’m often on the Tube thinking, ‘What would I say if this happened?’ or, ‘What’s the best turn of phrase for this?’ He also took care to ensure that he was in peak physical condition, resuming the punishing boxing sessions that saw him shed three stone in 2019 under the supervision of former light welterweight champion, Clinton McKenzie. ‘I am going to have to lose a stone, no question,’ said Edwards, who, aside from his BBC salary, raked in £25,000 in a single month in 2022 from speaking engagements. ‘I am just a bit too tight around the waist.’ Edwards, a married father-of-five, worked at the BBC for four decades. He has spoken openly about his mental health and getting fitter in recent years The presenter shared with BBC Radio Cymru that he had lost weight in 2019

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Rebel Wilson gives three clues to the identity of the Royal Family member who she claims invited her…

Rebel Wilson has claimed a member of the Royal Family invited her to a drug-fuelled orgy at the home of a US tech billionaire. The Australian does not name the royal, but gives three hints: he is male, it happened in 2014 and he was ‘fifteenth or twentieth in line to the British throne’. In her memoir, Rebel Rising, she tells how she got ‘a last-minute invite to a tech billionaire’s party’ from the royal who had told a male friend, ‘We need more girls’. ‘What a perfect opportunity to find a boyfriend, I thought.’ According to the book, the medieval-themed party was held at a rented ranch just outside Los Angeles. Wilson says she wore a ‘buxom damsel outfit complete with cone hat’ – which complemented her ‘child-bearing hips’ – and describes the event as ‘insane’ with acrobats mingling with the crowd and a giant firepit surrounded by cushions. She says she spoke to the billionaire, who is also unnamed, that night but who effectively ‘blanked’ her. At the party, she claims, men were jousting on horses in a field and there was a swimming pool full of girls dressed as mermaids. Because of the vastness of the house and its isolated location, guests were assigned rooms to sleep in overnight. The star of Pitch Perfect and Bridesmaids describes seeing the minor British royal there and drugs openly being handed around on trays. Wilson wrote: ‘I watch the British royal flounder around whilst I continuously hike up my boobs. They are my best physical asset’. She added that after a lavish firework display another unnamed man appeared with a tray of what looked like sweets but which was actually the drug MDMA. When she asks what they are for, the man replies ‘Oh, it’s for the orgy… the orgies normally start at these things at about this time’. The actress conveys her shock at the suggestion, saying: ‘Now the comment by the Windsor about needing more girls started to make a lot more sense.’ She claims earlier in the book that ‘the guy who invited me, who’s like fifteenth or twentieth in line to the British throne, had said to my male friend, ‘We need more girls’. ‘They weren’t talking about a boy-girl ratio like it was a year-eight disco. They were talking about an ORGY!’ Wilson writes that she was a virgin at the time and couldn’t shake the feeling that the party may have been filmed by hidden cameras. ‘Needless to say, I hike up my damsel dress and run out of there as fast as I can.’ The actress also claims that ‘around the same time’ she was offered $2 million to spend the weekend ‘with some Jordanian prince’. She said she ‘asked around the industry’ about what that kind of offer would entail and was told that she would be expected ‘at some point to sleep with the prince’. Wilson’s memoir has already been embroiled in controversy after making allegations about the behaviour of British comic Sacha Baron Cohen during the filming of their 2016 comedy Grimsby in the US version of the book. He strongly denies this. They have been redacted in the UK version. She is due in the UK this week for a promotional book tour.

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LIVE 6 PM ET: NTD Evening News Full Broadcast (April 22)

Views 44 • Apr-22-2024 The court approved former President Donald Trump’s $175-million bond in his New York civil fraud case Monday. That’s despite New York Attorney General Letitia James questioning its sufficiency. However, the court ruled that the provider has to keep the bond in full in a cash account. President Trump’s campaign finance hush money…

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Children of Flint Water Crisis Make Change as Environmental and Health Activists

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