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EDEN CONFIDENTIAL: Princess Beatrice’s pal Alice Naylor-Leyland surprises friends as she has her…

Princess Beatrice’s pal Alice Naylor-Leyland has surprised friends by announcing that she and her husband have had a child using a surrogate mother. She already has three children with Tom Naylor-Leyland, who is heir to a baronetcy and the £176million Fitzwilliam landowning fortune. ‘I’m aware it was greedy to have this burning desire to complete our family,’ she says. ‘But due to too many complications, setbacks, miscarriages and then being told I was no longer able to carry, we decided to venture down the world of surrogacy.’ Sharing a photograph online of the newborn baby’s foot with a pink tag, she thanks the unnamed surrogate mother. ‘Without the kindness and courage of our dear surrogate and the brilliance of modern science using our own embryo, we would not be here.’ While commercial surrogacy is commonplace in the USA, it is only legal in Britain if the mother is not paid, barring ‘reasonable’ expenses. Alice, 38, adds: ‘It’s been a bonkers journey but now we’ve arrived, I can’t wait to enjoy every minute.’ Earlier this month, the Vatican declared that surrogacy was a ‘grave threat’ to human dignity. The decree put it on par with abortion and euthanasia as practices that violate God’s plan for human life. Naylor-Leyland runs a business selling themed dining sets. Last month, Oscar-winner Reese Witherspoon was among the guests at the launch of her first pop-up shop of her ‘Mrs Alice’ tablescapes spring collection in California. Last year, Martha Stewart, the American cookery queen and business magnate, attended the launch party for Alice’s Alpine Tablescape range at Casa Cruz restaurant in New York. ‘It was a huge honour to have the iconic Martha Stewart attend,’ she told me at the time. ‘She was so charming and friendly and it was a pleasure talking all things tables. ‘It was so exciting to launch our Christmas Collection with Nina Garcia in New York and her new table edit is just beautiful. She’s been so kind to champion the Mrs. Alice brand.’ Lord Byron is to be moved from his traffic island in Park Lane, Mayfair. Byron’s descendant, the Earl of Lytton, has persuaded the Government to shift the old boy to Hyde Park, where Byron lovers will be in less danger of being mown down by traffic. The move was agreed by Lord Parkinson, culture minister, who conceded that the current site was ‘far less enticing and accessible than those islands of the Peloponnese that Lord Byron frequented’. The move will come a mere 66 years after it was first proposed by a government minister — indecent haste by Whitehall standards. Lord Lytton is a less raffish figure than his romantic forebear. He is a chartered surveyor who used to work for the Inland Revenue. Meghan in a jam as launch boosts sales of King’s conserve! The Duchess of Sussex’s launch of her first product, a jar of strawberry jam, is doing great business — for King Charles. Meghan’s publicity stunt, in which she sent jars of her American Riviera Orchard product to 50 friends and ‘influencers’, has encouraged royalists to purchase the King’s jam instead. So many of them have done so that Highgrove Organic Strawberry Preserve was ‘sold out’, according to the retailer’s website yesterday, even though 340g jars cost £6.95 each. Profits are donated to royal charities. Meghan’s profits will go to herself. Cleavage barbs shock Ashley Former Made In Chelsea star Ashley James was a guest on ITV’s This Morning this week and was shocked by the comments she received online from some women viewers about her lilac waistcoat, which they say exposed her ample cleavage. ‘I went on live TV, talking about the objectification of women in the media. I came off air to complaints from women,’ says Ashley, 37, who has two children. ‘These old breastfeeding boobs are still being shamed, just as they were as a child. ‘The problem is not my body or my clothes. The problem is society’s hyper-sexualisation of boobs. Enough!’ He’s a chef and former model who went out with pop princess Dua Lipa before enjoying a romance with actress Nell Tiger Free, a star of sexand-dragons drama Game Of Thrones. But the finances of Isaac Carew, 38, are proving less enviable than his love life. I can reveal his business, Isaac Carew Ltd, has gone bust, owing more than £352,000. Of that, £300,000 is owed to HMRC. Documents reveal a liquidator was appointed last month

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‘Forever chemicals’ found in US drinking water, map shows ‘hot spots’ of highest levels

The risk of having potentially harmful chemicals in your drinking water may depend on your zip code. A study published in the journal Nature Geoscience on April 8 found that higher amounts of PFAS (perfluoroalkyl substances) were found in drinking water in certain parts of the U.S. PFAS — also known as “forever chemicals” due to how slowly they break down — are a group of chemicals used during industrial processes and the manufacturing of consumer products. SCIENTISTS REVEAL SIMPLE NEW PROCESS THAT MAY HELP ELIMINATE TOXIC CHEMICALS FROM EVERYDAY ITEMS Two of the main chemicals are perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). There are many ways people can be exposed to these chemicals — including in drinking water. To determine the prevalence of PFAS in the environment, researchers from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney, Australia, analyzed a global dataset of 273 studies dating back to 2004. The studies included data for over 12,000 samples of surface water (water that collects on the ground) and more than 33,900 samples of groundwater (water found underground, below the surface). CHEMICALS IN WATER AND HOUSEHOLD OBJECTS COULD REDUCE CHANCES OF PREGNANCY, LIVE BIRTHS: NEW STUDY “We looked everywhere for PFAS concentrations in water data, including scientific journals and governmental reports and websites,” senior author of the study Denis O’Carroll, a UNSW engineering professor, told Fox News Digital. “We compared PFAS concentrations in these water samples to international regulations. We also compared the types of PFAS analyzed to what we found in consumer products.” Nearly 70% of the samples had levels of PFAS that exceeded Canada’s minimum safety standards (30 nanograms per liter), while 6% had more chemicals than the European Union’s standard (100 ng per liter), according to the study findings. In the U.S., PFAS “hot spots” were concentrated in the Midwest, New England and the West Coast, according to a map illustrating the findings — although the chemicals were also detected in other areas across the country. Globally, Australia, Europe and China showed high levels. NON-TOXIC CLEANING PRODUCTS TO USE WHILE SPRING CLEANING “To date, nobody has looked at the global extent of PFAS in our waters and compared it to international drinking water standards,” noted O’Carroll. “Our study found that a substantial fraction of sampled waters exceeded PFAS drinking water guidance values, with the extent of exceedance depending on the jurisdiction and PFAS source.” Health risks of PFAS Dr. Mark Fischer, regional medical director of International SOS, a health and security risk mitigation company headquartered in London, pointed out that most Americans also have these chemicals in their blood. “Although the use of these chemicals has declined in recent years, they are difficult to break down, so they are still found in some food, water and consumer products, as well as within the soil and the environment,” Fischer, who was not involved in the UNSW study, told Fox News Digital. Most people in the U.S. have been exposed to these chemicals, most likely through contaminated food or their drinking water, according to the CDC. Health risks associated with PFAS include cancers, elevated liver enzymes, lower birth weight and higher cholesterol, Fischer said. “PFAS contamination has been identified in drinking water in all 50 states.” Other potential dangers include heart issues, plus immune and developmental damage, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). “PFAS contamination has been identified in drinking water in all 50 states, according to the Environmental Working Group,” Fischer said. “That said, the levels of these chemicals vary throughout states and cities.” Study limitations The study did have some limitations, the researchers acknowledged. “We have measured a much wider range of PFAS in consumer products than in our waters,” said O’Carroll. HATE WATER? HERE ARE 5 HEALTHY ALTERNATIVES, ACCORDING TO AN NFL SPORTS DIETITIAN “As such, we don’t really have a great idea of the range of PFAS in our waters.” The data was also limited to what the researchers could find, he noted. “Just because we can cheaply use a chemical doesn’t mean we should.” “While we had data for over 45,000 water samples, even more data would be useful, especially for parts of the world where we had limited data.” The actual amount of PFAS in water could be higher than what the study results imply, O’Carroll added. “Current monitoring practices probably underestimate PFAS in the environment, given the limited suite of PFAS that are typically quantified but deemed of regulatory concern,” he said. These are just one of the many types of chemicals that are used in daily life, O’Carroll noted. CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP “As a society, we need to consider the chemicals we use and reduce our use of some,” he advised. “Just because we can cheaply use a chemical doesn’t mean we should.” Latest PFAS regulations On April 10, the EPA finalized new limits on the amount of PFAS chemicals permitted in drinking water. The new standards could reduce exposure for 100 million people, potentially preventing thousands of deaths and tens of thousands of serious illnesses, the agency said in a news release. This is the “first-ever national, legally enforceable drinking water standard” to protect people from the health risks of PFAS, the agency stated. The 66,000 public drinking water systems in the U.S. will have three years to reduce PFAS levels to meet the new standards, according to the release. CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR HEALTH NEWSLETTER The EPA also announced $1 billion in new funding, provided through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, to enable PFAS testing and treatment of public water systems and private wells. Fox News Digital reached out to the EPA and the American Water Works Association for comment. For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews.com/health.

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Starmer to set out plans for ‘historic’ £1.8bn investment in Britain’s ports

Labour plans to kick-start a “historic investment” in Britain’s ports as part of its green spending plans. The party has already committed to spending £1.8 billion over five years on upgrading the UK’s port infrastructure if it wins the next election as part of its flagship Green Prosperity Plan. On a visit to the North East of England on Thursday, Sir Keir Starmer is expected to say the money will lead to the most significant upgrade of Britain’s ports in a generation and billions more pouring into the UK’s energy industry from the private sector. Before his visit, the Labour leader said: “The legacy of 14 years of Conservative rule is Britain’s industrial strength reduced to the rubble and rust of closed-down factories. “They have let good jobs go overseas and done nothing about it – and every community has paid the price. “A Labour government will reindustrialise Britain, from the biggest investment in our ports in a generation to a British jobs bonus to crowd billions of investment into our industrial heartlands and coastal communities.” Coastal constituencies have been identified as a key weathervane for the next election, having disproportionately backed winning parties over the last 40 years, and polling suggests voters living near the sea have swung behind Labour. The planned investment in port infrastructure will form part of Labour’s Green Prosperity Plan, which had originally come with a total price tag of £28 billion per year before the party rowed back from that figure, claiming the current Government had damaged the public finances too badly. Labour sees such investment as crucial to its plans to decarbonise electricity generation by 2030, with ports playing a key role in delivering offshore wind power among other parts of the net zero transition. But the Conservatives have criticised the plans as unrealistic and unaffordable, claiming they would mean higher taxes or more borrowing. Sir Keir is expected to be joined by shadow chancellor Rachel Reeves and shadow net zero secretary Ed Miliband on Thursday. Ms Reeves said: “Ports are critical hubs for our nation, providing over 90% of trade into the country, connecting people, providing services for maritime energy facilities and delivering value for local communities. “Ports will be at the centre of Labour’s plans to make Britain a clean energy superpower.” Mr Miliband echoed this point, saying clean energy “requires flourishing national ports”. Overall, Labour has said its plans for green investment will deliver up to 650,000 jobs over the next decade, including 35,000 in the North East, and will be funded by closing “loopholes” in the windfall tax on oil and gas companies. Ms Reeves said: “Labour’s Green Prosperity Plan is central in our mission to grow the economy. It will deliver tens of billions of pounds of private sector investment in the industries of the future, create hundreds of thousands of well-paid jobs across the country and put more money in people’s pockets.” Claire Coutinho, the Energy Security Secretary, accused Labour of using the announcement to distract from questions about Angela Rayner’s tax affairs. She added: “And once again they are committing to their unfunded decarbonisation promise, which Labour themselves say costs £28 billion a year, but they have no plan to pay for it. “Straight from the same old Labour playbook, Ed Miliband’s unfunded spending commitments will take families and businesses back to square one with higher borrowing and higher taxes.” The £28 billion figure originally committed to by Labour, but now abandoned, was for the entirety of its Green Prosperity Plan, of which decarbonising the energy grid was only part.

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Rangers title hopes suffer critical blow as they draw to Dundee

Rangers’ recent regression continued with a grim goalless draw at Dundee which further dented their increasingly-fragile cinch Premiership title hopes. The Ibrox side lost for the first time ever against Ross County on Sunday in the poorest performance since boss Philippe Clement took over last October and the Gers boss was looking for a reaction against the Dark Blues. In a game played at the third time of asking after the Dens Park pitch was twice ruled unplayable, there was no improvement against a Dundee side who impressed. The travelling Gers fans urged their team on after the break but they lacked imagination and guile and again heard boos at the final whistle. With five post-split matches remaining including a trip to Celtic Park, the Light Blues are three points behind the Hoops at the top of the table and have hit the skids at the wrong time. Rangers will now prepare for the Scottish Gas Scottish Cup semi-final against Hearts at Hampden Park on Sunday with newly-acquired trepidation. Tony Docherty’s Dundee, who commendably clinched a top-six place on their return to the top flight, are now three points behind fifth-placed St Mirren and they deserved their point. It is now just two wins in eight in all competitions for Clement’s stumbling side. Utility player Dujon Sterling, midfielder Tom Lawrence and striker Kemar Roofe returned to the side with the latter making his first start since December 20 as Borna Barisic, Kieran Dowell and Cyriel Dessers dropped to the bench. Ricki Lamie, Owen Dodgson and Malachi Boateng were back for the Taysiders, who came close to scoring within a minute when Boateng’s low drive just escaped Ibrox keeper Jack Butland’s right-hand post. Dundee skipper Joe Shaughnessy limped off after 10 minutes to be replaced by Antonio Portales before Gers attacker Abdallah Sima outstripped the home defence but his low drive was blocked by the foot of Jon McCracken, the Dundee keeper saving another effort from the Brighton loanee moments later. Dundee played the better football. In the 22nd minute Butland parried a Luke McCowan free-kick from 25 yards and Scott Tiffoney got to the rebound first to help it on to Amadou Bakayoko to knock over the line from a yard out but the offside flag went up. Rangers toiled, threatening only occasionally. McCracken pushed a curling free-kick from Gers skipper James Tavernier round the post then saved a Connor Goldson header from the resulting corner but it was the more composed and fluid home side who were applauded off at the break. Rangers stepped up the tempo at the start of the second half but a spark of creativity was absent and Dundee’s defending was organised. In the 56th minute, Clement tried a shake-up and Dessers, Dowell and Rabbi Matondo replaced Roofe, Todd Cantwell and Fabio Silva and McCracken soon had to save from Lawrence’s drive from a tight angle. McCracken pulled off a fine save from Dessers’ curling shot as the Dees defence were stretched for once and held a tame Tavernier header but it was mostly huffing and puffing from the visitors while Dundee were always a threat. Worryingly for Gers fans, their side have suffered a dip in form at the wrong time of the season. Get the latest sports headlines straight to your inbox by signing up for free email alerts.

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Dubious claims about voting flyers at a migrant camp show how the border is inflaming US politics

By VALERIE GONZALEZ and ALI SWENSON (Associated Press) McALLEN, Texas (AP) — A humanitarian organization in northeastern Mexico said it did not create flyers urging migrants to vote for President Joe Biden that were filmed at its shelter in a viral video that sparked a firestorm of conservative outrage this week. Accusations that Resource Center Matamoros was encouraging noncitizens to vote gained momentum after online posts displayed Spanish-language flyers instructing migrants to vote illegally for Biden once they arrived in the U.S. The flyers contained the logo of the organization, but it was not clear who created or posted them. Videos showed them on the interior walls of portable toilets at the center’s shelter near Mexico’s border with Texas. Resource Center Matamoros founder Gaby Zavala told The Associated Press the organization doesn’t know who made the flyers and said her group “does not encourage immigrants to register to vote or cast ballots in the U.S.” The provenance of the flyers was still unknown Wednesday. They contained errors in spelling and grammar, and appeared to include verbatim paragraphs from the organization’s English-language website that were translated into Spanish using online translation software. Despite the flyers’ uncertain origin, unverified claims about them have proliferated online this week and came up during a congressional hearing Tuesday, when House Republicans raised them in their questioning of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas. The episode reflects how rapidly claims related to the migrant surge at the border can spread and influence the political debate as the presidential election approaches. Former President Donald Trump and his allies have used the surge to say, without evidence, that Democrats are allowing migrants into country as a way to boost Biden’s re-election chances. Only U.S. citizens are permitted to vote in federal elections and historically the number of noncitizens caught attempting to cast a ballot illegally is extremely small. Images and videos of the flyers at the Matamoros center erupted online after the Heritage Foundation’s oversight arm posted them on the social platform X on Monday evening. The conservative think tank shared an image of one of the flyers, which was labeled as coming from Zavala and contained both the Resource Center Matamoros logo and another logo in Spanish reading, “all with Biden.” It also shared a video that showed multiple flyers posted inside portable toilets where migrants might see them. The letter misspelled the Spanish word for welcome, “bienvenidos,” as “bienvedinos.” It also contained minor grammatical errors in Spanish, including an incorrect tense (“mientras esperan” should be “mientras esperen”) and the United States in lower case (“estados unidos”). The text appeared to lift a paragraph from Resource Center Matamoros’ English-language website, reciting the first two sentences verbatim, but translated to Spanish. The flyer added two sentences — which do not appear on the group’s website — saying migrants need to vote for Biden. “This flyer obviously seeks to prey on unsophisticated illegals and encourages them to illegally vote,” the Heritage Foundation wrote on one of its social posts. Heritage also published a short audio clip of Zavala having a conversation with an unidentified male. After the male says he is trying to help as many people as possible before Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, gets re-elected, Zavala can be heard saying, “Believe me, we’re in the same boat.” The nine-second exchange did not include any further mention of voting or elections. Zavala did not answer detailed questions about the exchange and told the AP that her organization does not support political campaigns for or against candidates. She said such activity would be “outside the scope of our mission.” The Heritage Foundation did not immediately respond to a request for comment. As of Wednesday it was not clear when the video was shot, who created and posted the flyers, how long they remained inside the portable toilets or whether any migrants saw them. The think-tank credited the discovery of the flyers to a website that frequently posts about border issues, and whose founder regularly appears on streaming programs that promote conspiracy theories. The claims that Resource Center Matamoros was behind the flyers were shared far and wide online, amassing millions of views across social media platforms. Threats appeared on a pro-Trump website, calling for Zavala’s neck to be snapped and for members of her organization to be hanged. A flurry of partisan researchers online dug into the group’s background, trying to identify potential links to a variety of U.S. and left-wing campaigns and causes. The flyers briefly mentioned the Jewish humanitarian organization HIAS, on whose board Mayorkas once sat. That connection drove additional claims that both HIAS and the Biden administration were using the flyers to try to rig the election. HIAS told AP it did not produce the flyers, does not support their message and has not rented space from or had any ties to Resource Center Matamoros since 2022. “These flyers are a clear attempt to spread misinformation about HIAS’ work to support refugees,” its statement read. Biden campaign spokesperson Ammar Moussa called the flyers disinformation and said they should be labeled that way on social platforms and websites. Republican Reps. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia and Dan Bishop of North Carolina brought up the flyers during a congressional hearing with Mayorkas on Tuesday, the same day as the House sent articles of impeachment against him to the Senate. Greene accused Mayorkas of “aiding NGOs (non-governmental organizations) to steal our elections through your budget.” She didn’t pause to allow him to respond. Mayorkas didn’t immediately respond on Wednesday to the AP’s request for comment. The claims exploded online as Trump and other Republicans are claiming that the surge of migrants at the country’s southern border increases the risk that some of them living in the country without documentation will vote illegally. When people in the U.S. register to vote, they confirm under penalty of perjury that they are U.S. citizens. Several states also verify that registration against federal and state databases. While there have been anecdotal instances of noncitizens casting ballots, various states have examined their voter rolls and found no indication of significant numbers of noncitizens voting in federal elections. Studies also have shown the incidence is exceedingly rare. ___ Associated Press immigration writer Elliot Spagat contributed to this report. ___ The Associated Press receives support from several private foundations to enhance its explanatory coverage of elections and democracy. See more about AP’s democracy initiative here. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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OJ Simpson has been cremated, estate attorney in Las Vegas says. No public memorial is planned

By KEN RITTER (Associated Press) LAS VEGAS (AP) — Former football star and celebrity criminal defendant O.J. Simpson was cremated Wednesday, the lawyer handling his estate said following his death last week at home in Las Vegas at age 76. Attorney Malcolm LaVergne told The Associated Press he was present, along with unspecified other people, for the morning event at Palm Mortuary in downtown Las Vegas. “I am able to verify that O.J. Simpson was cremated today,” LaVergne said shortly afterward. “Others were present, but I’m not disclosing who.” He declined to provide details of the process. A telephone message for Palm Mortuary was not immediately returned. LaVergne is handling Simpson’s trust and estate in Nevada state court. He said Simpson’s cremains will be given to Simpson’s children “to do with as they please, according to the wishes of their father.” No public memorial was planned, the attorney said. Simpson died April 10 after he was diagnosed last year with prostate cancer. LaVergne said in a Tuesday interview that he visited Simpson just before Easter at the country club home where Simpson leased southwest of the Las Vegas Strip, and described Simpson as “awake, alert and chilling” sitting on a couch, drinking a beer and ”just catching up on the news.” On April 5, a doctor told LaVergne that Simpson was “transitioning,” as the attorney described it, and by last week Simpson only had strength to ask for water and to choose to watch a TV golf tournament instead of a tennis match. A post on April 11 from Simpson’s family on X, formerly Twitter, said Simpson “succumbed to his battle with cancer.” It asked on their behalf for “privacy and grace.” “You have to remember that they’ve shared O.J. with the world their entire lives,” LaVergne said Tuesday of Simpson’s surviving adult children of his first marriage — Arnelle Simpson, now 55, and Jason Simpson, 53 — and the children Simpson had with ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson before she was killed in 1994: Sydney Simpson, 38, and Justin Simpson, 35. “And they have the added burden that he is one of the most famous people on the planet, and who is polarizing and who is surrounded by controversy.” Simpson’s children are the only beneficiaries of his estate, LaVergne said, adding he is now working to determine the value of Simpson’s assets. He said Tuesday that Simpson did not own a home in states where he had lived — including Nevada, California and Florida. Simpson was a record-setting football star during 11 years as a running back in the NFL and became a movie actor, sportscaster and television advertising pitchman before he was famously acquitted of criminal charges alleging he stabbed his ex-wife and her friend, Ronald Goldman, to death in 1994 in Los Angeles. The proceedings in California in 1996 became known as the “trial of the century.” Simpson was found liable for the deaths in 1997 by a separate California civil court jury and was ordered to pay the families of Simpson’s slain ex-wife and Goldman $33.5 million in compensation. LaVergne acknowledged Simpson died without paying the bulk of that judgment. In Las Vegas, Simpson went to prison in 2008 for nine years after being found guilty of armed robbery in a 2007 encounter at a casino-hotel with two collectibles dealers. He was released from prison in October 2017 and lived a golf-and-country club lifestyle in Las Vegas — sometimes offering social media posts about sports and golf. His last message was on Feb. 11, when the NFL championship Super Bowl was played in Las Vegas. He did not attend the game. Attorney David Cook, representing the Goldman family, said Tuesday he thought the civil judgment owed today, including unpaid interest, is more than $114 million. LaVergne he believed the amount was more than $200 million, and that Simpson’s assets won’t amount to that. LaVergne said he intends invite representatives of the Goldman and Brown families to “view my homework” with the Simpson estate, ”with the caveat that if they believe something else is out there … they’re going to have to use their own attorneys, their own resources, to try and chase down that pot of gold.”

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96% of this county voted for Trump in 2020. Hear what residents there think about the hush money trial

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House Republican Delays Departure to Screw Over His Own Party

Representative Mike Gallagher’s last day in Congress was supposed to be Friday, but some wavering votes on upcoming legislation might delay his exit. The Wisconsin Republican confirmed Wednesday that he would be sticking around for an “extra day or so” to help push through Speaker Mike Johnson’s foreign aid package for Taiwan, Israel, and Ukraine, according to CNBC’s Emily Wilkins. “His office says he has the flexibility,” Wilkins wrote on X, formerly known as Twitter. Gallagher’s decision to stay may help offset a growing number of Republicans who appear upset about a series of forthcoming bills, which include the foreign aid package, a border security bill that will include “core components” of the GOP’s border security proposal known as H.R. 2, an amendment process on the Rebuilding Economic Prosperity and Opportunity for Ukrainians Act, and Gallagher’s TikTok ban. One of those uncertain Republicans is South Carolina Representative Ralph Norman, who reversed his stance on the supplementary aid package on Tuesday after supporting it for the better part of the last week, telling Politico’s Jordain Carney that he wasn’t sure he’d vote in support of it in the Rules Committee anymore. “I don’t know. This is very upsetting. And I don’t understand it,” Norman told Carney. And Gallagher’s delayed leave will push back a proposal by Georgia Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene to strip Johnson of the gavel over his support for Ukraine, an effort that received a small boost of support on Tuesday after Kentucky Representative Thomas Massie announced he was also sick of Johnson. That effort needs just one more conservative defector in order to oust the speaker—or it could move forward with just the two of them, if it takes place after Gallagher’s exit. When the Wisconsin lawmaker announced his leave in March, he chose the original exit date of April 19 with apparent disregard for how his caucus might replace him. That date was already too late to host a special election to refill his seat and help Republicans keep their razor-thin majority. The new date of departure, which seems to be foggy, won’t make that process any easier.

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Walter ‘Slim’ Coleman dead: Activist who helped elect Mayor Harold Washington was 80

Walter ‘Slim’ Coleman, a dyed-in-the-wool radical activist of the 1960s who for decades harnessed the power of the city’s poor to challenge its power structure and achieve social justice goals, died Tuesday after a long bout with illness. He was 80. One of his biggest accomplishments was helping to organize a voting drive in Chicago’s poor white communities that helped elect Mayor Harold Washington, the city’s first Black mayor. Mr. Coleman moved to Chicago from Cleveland in 1966 to continue his work with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, a mostly Black, student-run civil rights group. After the organization dissolved, Mr. Coleman began working with Students for a Democratic Society, which had headquarters at 1608 W. Madison, a short distance from the headquarters of the Black Panther Party. Mr. Coleman became close with Black Panther leader Fred Hampton as a result. After parting ways with the Students for a Democratic Society over what he viewed as racist conduct within their ranks, Mr. Coleman created the People’s Information Center in Lincoln Park, which functioned as the white arm of the Black Panther Party and aided thousands of poor whites and Latinos who lived on the city’s North Side. After Hampton was killed by police in 1969, Mr. Coleman established the Intercommunal Survival Collective of the Black Panther Party in Uptown, which was also home to impoverished white families. Its purpose was to begin the same kind of survival programs in the white community — providing food, education and legal assistance — that the Black Panthers started in they city’s Black neighborhoods. The group evolved into the Heart of Uptown Coalition. One of the radical activists that Mr. Coleman recruited to help in the effort was future 46th Ward Ald. Helen Shiller. In the 1970s, Mr. Coleman became more active politically, and worked to unseat Cook County States Attorney Edward Hanrahan and register voters to support Washington’s eventual path to the mayor’s office. He later served as an informal adviser to Washington. Mr. Coleman was vehemently opposed to what he viewed as the city’s racist Democratic machine that stood against Washington during the “council wars” of the 1980s. Congressman Bobby Rush, a former Black Panther leader who counted Mr. Coleman as one of his best friends, credited Mr. Coleman with helping shape Chicago and the country. “There would not have been a Harold Washington, there would not have been a Carol Moseley Braun, there would not have been a Barack Obama if not for the singular contribution of Slim Coleman,” Rush said in a statement. “His life will always be a beacon to those who seek a more just and equitable life, and nation.” Coleman created the “Fair Share” organization with his future wife, Emma Lozano, to fight gentrification in the West Town and Bucktown communities. Mr. Coleman later became pastor and headed up Adalberto United Methodist Church in Humboldt Park. Mr. Coleman made national headlines in 2006 when he housed undocumented immigrant Elvira Arellano at the church so she could avoid deportation by federal authorities. Mr. Coleman was born Aug. 20, 1943, and grew up in a conservative household in Lubbock, Texas. His view of the world changed when he was 16 and attended a Bo Diddley concert, where he was one of the only white people in the audience and befriended a Black college student who was a radical activist. Mr. Coleman attended Harvard University on a scholarship but dropped out shortly before graduation to begin his life in activism (although he later finished his degree). Mr. Coleman, tall with his slicked back hair and a southern drawl, became a recognizable protest leader. He was a champion for the poor whites in Uptown, many of whom had Appalachian roots and were pejoratively cast as the hillbillies of the North Side. Michael Klonsky, a friend who served as national secretary of Students for a Democratic Society in the 1960s, called him a “supreme organizer.” “Slim believed the real power was in organization, putting people in the streets and packing people into government meetings, and building alternative institutions that served people and put pressure on mainstream institutions to reform or, otherwise, face the fear that radicals like Slim would defeat them,” Klonsky said. Mr. Coleman also served as an immigration policy aide to former Congressman Luis Gutiérrez. Helen Shiller’s son, Brendan Shiller, a political policy consultant, remembers growing up in the presence of Mr. Coleman and other activists. “He was a very smart dude who ended up being around a bunch of other smart dudes during a time and period when it was easy to become radicalized, and when you’re that smart, it’s hard not to have an ego, and he had a huge heart and big brain and lot of ego, and that combination makes you a very driven person,” he said. An obituary released by his family said that Mr. Coleman left behind a “legacy of community leadership and activism in Chicago on behalf of justice for people and communities fighting for fairness and access to resources and power.” Mr. Coleman, who died at his home next to the Lincoln United Methodist Church in Pilsen, loved music — mostly country, blues and folk, and playing guitar. He is survived by his wife, Emma Lozano, and children Robert Rico, Anita Rico, Tanya Lozano, Joline Lozano and Roberto C. Lopez and six grandchildren. Services are pending.

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Bob Graham dies at 87; former Florida senator was early critic of Iraq war

Associated Press TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Former U.S. Sen. and two-term Florida Gov. Bob Graham, who gained national prominence as chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee in the aftermath of the 2001 terrorist attacks and as an early critic of the Iraq war, has died. He was 87. Graham’s family announced the death Tuesday in a statement posted on X by his daughter Gwen Graham. “We are deeply saddened to report the passing of a visionary leader, dedicated public servant, and even more importantly, a loving husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather,” the family said. Graham, who served three terms in the Senate, made an unsuccessful bid for the 2004 Democratic presidential nomination, emphasizing his opposition to the Iraq invasion. But his bid was delayed by heart surgery in January 2003, and he was never able to gain enough traction with voters to catch up, bowing out that October. He didn’t seek reelection in 2004 and was replaced by Republican Mel Martinez. Graham was a man of many quirks. He perfected the “workdays” political gimmick of spending a day doing various jobs from horse stall mucker to FBI agent and kept a meticulous diary, noting almost everyone he spoke with, everything he ate, the TV shows he watched and even his golf scores. Graham said the notebooks were a working tool for him and he was reluctant to describe his emotions or personal feelings in them. “I review them for calls to be made, memos to be dictated, meetings I want to follow up on and things people promise to do,” he said. Graham was among the earliest opponents of the Iraq war, saying it diverted America’s focus on the battle against terrorism centered in Afghanistan. He was also critical of President George W. Bush for failing to have an occupation plan in Iraq after the U.S. military threw out Saddam Hussein in 2003. Graham said Bush took the United States into the war by exaggerating claims of the danger presented by the Iraqi weapons of destruction that were never found. He said Bush distorted intelligence data and argued it was more serious than the sexual misconduct issues that led the House to impeach President Bill Clinton in the late 1990s. It led him to launch his short, abortive presidential bid. “The quagmire in Iraq is a distraction that the Bush administration, and the Bush administration alone, has created,” Graham said in 2003. During his 18 years in Washington, Graham worked well with colleagues from both parties, particularly Florida Republican Connie Mack during their dozen years together in the Senate. As a politician, few were better. Florida voters hardly considered him the wealthy Harvard-educated attorney that he was. Graham’s political career spanned five decades, beginning with his election to the Florida House of Representatives in 1966. He won a state Senate seat in 1970 and then was elected governor in 1978. He was re-elected in 1982. Four years later, he won the first of three terms in the U.S. Senate when he ousted incumbent Republican Paula Hawkins. Graham remained widely popular with Florida voters — winning reelection by wide margins in 1992 and 1998 when he carried 63 of 67 counties. In that latter election, he defeated Charlie Crist, who later served as a Republican governor from 2007 to 2011. “He blew me out of the water, and I came to know even more so why during the course of the campaign,” Crist said Tuesday night. “I learned to respect him even more than I already had, and love him for the good, decent man that he was.” Crist, who has since switched parties and most recently served as a U.S. representative, said Graham was an influence on him. “I always felt that when he was governor, that he was trying to govern for the people of Florida — not in any way political or partisan — and I took that to heart and tried to, in some small way, emulate it,” Crist said. House Speaker Emerita Nancy Pelosi called Graham “a patriotic American” and thanked him for his “distinguished public service.” She highlighted his work on the inquiry into 9/11 and said he “bravely opposed entry into the war in Iraq.” “He brought his love for his family and for his state of Florida to the Senate, where he served with immense dignity and courage,” she said in a statement Tuesday. Even when in Washington, Graham never took his eye off the state and the leadership in Tallahassee. When Gov. Jeb Bush and the Republican-controlled Legislature eliminated the Board of Regents in 2001, Graham saw it as a move to politicize the state university system. He led a successful petition drive the next year for a state constitutional amendment that created the Board of Governors to assume the regents’ role. Daniel Robert Graham was born Nov. 9, 1936, in Coral Gables, where his father, Ernest “Cap” Graham, had moved from South Dakota and established a large dairy operation. Young Bob milked cows, built fences and scooped manure as a teenager. One of his half-brothers, Phillip Graham, was publisher of The Washington Post and Newsweek until he took his own life in 1963, just a year after Bob Graham’s graduation from Harvard Law. Graham was president of the student body at Miami Senior High School and attended the University of Florida, graduating in 1959. In 1966 he was elected to the Florida Legislature, where he focused largely on education and health care issues. Graham got off to a shaky start as Florida’s chief executive, and was dubbed “Gov. Jello” for some early indecisiveness. He shook that label through his handling of several serious crises. As governor he also signed numerous death warrants, founded the Save the Manatee Club with entertainer Jimmy Buffett and led efforts to establish several environmental programs. Graham pushed through a bond program to buy beaches and barrier islands threatened by development and started the Save Our Everglades program to protect the state’s water supply, wetlands and endangered species. “This has been a very important part of my development as a public official, my learning at a very human level what the people of Florida expect, what they want, what their aspirations are and then trying to interpret that and make it policy that will improve their lives” said Graham in 2004 as he completed his final job as a Christmas gift wrapper. After leaving public life in 2005, Graham spent much of his time at a public policy center named after him at the University of Florida and pushing the Legislature to require more civics classes in the state’s public schools. Graham was one of five members selected for an independent commission by President Barack Obama in June 2010 to investigate a massive BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico that threatened sea life and beaches along several southeastern Gulf states.

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