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Man arrested for setting fire outside Sen. Bernie Sanders’s office

A man was arrested Sunday for allegedly lighting a fire outside the Burlington, Vt., office of Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), authorities said. Shant Soghomonian, 35, is charged with using fire to damage the building, according to the U.S. attorney’s office for Vermont. No injuries were reported, the office said, and Soghomonian’s motive remained unclear as of Sunday afternoon.

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Kate Garraway defended by fans after feeling ‘ashamed’ at being in £800k debt

Kate Garraway has been defended after she shared an insight into her luxury flight experience after she opened up on her £800,000 debt. The Good Morning Britain presenter took to social media to share her gratitude for the extraordinary service she received on the Emirates flight, despite international storms and delays, reports the Mirror. She wrote: “Just landed back home after an amazing week filming – meeting some truly inspirational people (can reveal all in September). Every flight that lands safely is a good flight by me! “But this was exceptional. Despite storms internationally and delays the staff were calm and kind and managed to look as fresh as these flowers – even on landing. I am more resembling pot pouri but feel great! ! ! Thanks @emirates . #itsthelittlebigthings #kind #gratitude #pureclass.” It comes after she announced an exciting new career venture. The mum-of-two – who heartbreakingly lost her husband Derek in January after his prolonged battle with coronavirus complications – has previously spoken about the financial strain she’s faced. Kate confessed her ITV earnings don’t stretch to cover the debts that she incurred from Derek’s extensive care needs, candidly discussing her £800,000 debt situation. Derek died at the age of 56 earlier this year, having required continuous support from carers and therapists to help with his mobility and speech for over four years. Despite the complexity of his condition, Kate, also 56, received no Government aid. Her loyal followers leapt to her defence after she faced harsh criticism over a lavish plane journey. One supporter commented: “Such an amazing lady for doing everything for derek and now for her kids. No need to be nasty. If u don’t like her block her. She is brilliant and may god give her everything she deserves.” Another chimed in with words of encouragement: “Glad to hear your feeling great Kate, good for you.” A third sympathiser remarked: “Kate has just lost her husband, she’s working to support her children. The flight was probably paid by the company she’s working for. Why are people so nasty with their comments. If you’re not happy don’t read the posts. Sending love to you Kate x.” Kate has previously answered to the harsh backlash she was targeted with on social media as she continues to speak up about her late husband’s struggle. “I think people are a bit bored of me banging on about the same thing”, she said on This Morning. “I understand that, really. I don’t think I would have made a third one if it hadn’t been that Derek wanted to but I’m glad I did.” She added: “Those other people can’t (speak out), they don’t have a place to talk about it and they’re saying to me ‘please don’t give up. I sort of have to and I’m sorry about that and if people do watch it, maybe they will see it’s coming from a different place.” Kate explained the costs of care for Derek were £16,000 a month in her latest documentary. Join the Daily Record’s WhatsApp community here and get the latest news sent straight to your messages. Kate said: “I know I have an incredible job and I’m very well paid, and that’s why I felt that I had to be that honest. Because if I can’t afford it, and people can’t cope 24 hours a day on their own, you can’t look after someone 24 hours a day. Derek had huge medical needs but even he wasn’t considered medically serious enough to get that support, so what on earth is it like for someone who’s one down for that? I just fear for us all really.” Get the latest celebrity gossip and telly news sent straight to your inbox. Sign up to our daily Showbiz newsletter here.

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Israel is pulling troops from southern Gaza. Now the plan is to clear Hamas from Rafah

Video in Khan Younis on Sunday showed some people returning to a landscape marked by shattered multistory buildings and climbing over debris to explore crumbled, dusty remains. Cars were overturned and charred. Israel for weeks has vowed a ground offensive in nearby Rafah. But the city shelters some 1.4 million people — more than half of Gaza’s population. The prospect of an offensive has raised global alarm, including from Israel’s top ally, the US, which has demanded to see a credible plan to protect civilians. Allowing people to return to nearby Khan Younis could relieve some pressure on Rafah. White House national security spokesman John Kirby repeated the US opposition to a Rafah offensive and told American broadcaster ABC that the US believes that the partial Israeli withdrawal “is really just about rest and refit for these troops that have been on the ground for four months and not necessarily, that we can tell, indicative of some coming new operation for these troops.” Israel’s military quietly drew down troops in devastated northern Gaza earlier in the war. But it has continued to carry out airstrikes and raids in areas where it says Hamas has resurfaced, including Gaza’s largest hospital, Shifa, leaving what the head of the World Health Organisation called “an empty shell.”

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Larry David’s Unsung Fashion Criticism on ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’

In a midseries episode of “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” Larry David, the HBO show’s star and creator, greets his No. 1 frenemy, Susie, (Susie Essman), who has turned up at a fancy gathering wearing a top hat and a morning coat. He gives her a once-over, then announces, with all the finesse of a carnival barker, “Ladies and gentlemen, the 16th president of the United States, Abraham Lincoln.” Susie shoots him a stink eye. “Like you know anything about fashion,” she sneers.

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Can Minor League Baseball Survive Its Real Estate Problems?

Ed Willson has a jar filled with dirt sitting on his desk. For more than 40 years, Mr. Willson has been a fan of the minor league baseball team in Eugene, Ore., the Emeralds, and a season-ticket holder for 22 seasons. He was crushed when Civic Stadium, the longtime home of the team, burned to the ground in 2015. “It was a serious heartbreak,” Mr. Willson said. After the fire, Mr. Willson made a pilgrimage to the scorched diamond, where he filled a plastic bag with dirt from the pitcher’s mound that he considered sacred. He planned to give it to the team when it began construction on its new stadium. Nine years later, the dirt is still on Mr. Willson’s desk. The Emeralds are still without a permanent home. And there’s a risk that the team, after 69 seasons, may leave town altogether. Although the Emeralds (also known for their Sasquatch mascot, Sluggo) have survived wildfires, losing seasons, recessions, Major League Baseball’s 2020 reorganization of the minor leagues and Covid, they are a team without a ballpark.

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Man intentionally struck by SUV in Brockton dies; driver charged with murder

A man has died after being struck by an SUV Saturday morning in Brockton, Massachusetts, and police say the pedestrian crash wasn’t an accident. The Plymouth County District Attorney’s Office announced Sunday that 50-year-old Stuart Smith succumbed to his injuries late Saturday night, more than 12 hours after he was allegedly intentionally struck by a vehicle. The man driving the SUV, identified as 45-year-old Vasco Semedo, is now facing a murder charge. According to officials, Brockton police received several 911 calls around 8:53 a.m. Saturday for reports of a pedestrian crash at 65 North Main Street. Responding officers found Smith unresponsive on the pavement in front of a Toyota Rav 4, and Semedo being detained by people at the scene. Smith was taken to Good Samaritan Hospital and then flown by medical helicopter to Massachusetts General Hospital. He died from his injuries at 10:34 p.m., officials said. Semedo was arrested on scene. He was initially charged with attempted murder, two counts of assault and battery with a dangerous weapon causing serious bodily injury and negligent operation of a motor vehicle. After Smith died, the charge was upgraded to murder. Officials say an investigation involving witness accounts and surveillance footage led detectives to determine that Semedo was behind the wheel of the Rav 4 when he ran into Smith and then backed up and drove into him again. Semedo next allegedly got out of his SUV and used a brick to repeatedly hit Smith, who was laying on the ground. Police have not said if Semedo and Smith were known to each other, or provided any information on a possible motive. Semedo is scheduled to be arraigned Monday in Brockton District Court at which point more details should be revealed. Attorney information wasn’t immediately available. An investigation is active and ongoing.

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Mass. Powerball player wins $1 million prize

A lucky Powerball player in Massachusetts woke up one million dollars richer on Sunday. The Massachusetts Lottery says the winning ticket was sold at the Route 110 Convenience Store in Methuen. The winning numbers drawn early Sunday morning — following a delay over required “pre-draw procedures” — were: 22, 27, 44, 52, 69 and the red Powerball 9. An even luckier Powerball player in Oregon had a ticket matching all six numbers and won the jackpot worth $1.326 billion, Powerball said in a statement. Until this latest drawing, there had been 41 consecutive drawings without a jackpot winner — no one had won Powerball’s top prize since New Year’s Day. Powerball is played in 45 states plus Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

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Southwest Boeing 737 lost engine cowling during takeoff, FAA investigating

A Southwest Airlines flight returned to Denver International Airport after losing an engine cowling that struck a wing flap during takeoff, the Federal Aviation Administration said. Customers on the flight were put on another plane and were scheduled to arrive at their Houston destination three hours late. Mechanical problems have added to FAA scrutiny of the aviation industry in recent months. An engine cowling fell off of a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-800 and struck a wing flap during takeoff from Denver International Airport, the Federal Aviation Administration said Sunday. The FAA said Southwest Flight 3695 was on its way to Houston’s William P. Hobby Airport and safely returned to the gate at 8:15 a.m. local time. Southwest said customers on the flight transferred to a different aircraft and were scheduled to arrive at their destination three hours late. “Our Maintenance teams are reviewing the aircraft,” Southwest said. The FAA said it is investigating the incident. Southwest didn’t immediately respond when asked when the plane and engine last underwent maintenance. In response to a request for comment, Boeing pointed to Southwest’s statement. The cowling loss comes as the FAA investigates a separate Southwest incident in March. One of its flights strayed off course and flew close to the air traffic control tower at LaGuardia Airport as it attempted a landing in New York. The plane is an older model of the Boeing 737 than the Max jets. Boeing is under heightened regulatory scrutiny after a January incident when a door plug blew off a nearly new 737 Max 9 when the Alaska Airlines flight was at 16,000 feet, causing a near-catastrophe. Boeing’s quality control issues have spiraled into safety concerns, slowing deliveries of new Max aircraft. Big Boeing customers like Southwest and United say the issues have affected their growth plans. The long-awaited FAA certification of its 737 Max 7 and Max 10 models is also behind previous schedules. Boeing CEO Dave Calhoun last month said that he would step down by year’s end, and Boeing replaced its chairman and chief executive of its commercial airplane unit.

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I’m exhausted all the time — doctors called me lazy until they discovered my rare condition

She was tired of being tired all the time. Alyssa Davis often found herself dozing off at school and in dance classes growing up, which she chalked up to not getting enough sleep. But the 26-year-old model and digital marketer knew something was amiss when she found it “impossible” to fight the urge to close her eyes out of pure exhaustion. The North Carolina resident sought medical advice, claiming doctors dismissed her for years by telling her to “just drink coffee” — until she took part in a clinical sleep study and was diagnosed with idiopathic hypersomnia. “It’s like being trapped in the ‘Groundhog Day’ movie — except instead of reliving the same day, I just relive the same exhaustion,” Davis told What’s The Jam. Idiopathic hypersomnia is a rare chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive sleepiness with no clear cause, affecting only up to 50 in every 1 million people, according to the Sleep Foundation news site. Symptoms include dizziness or lightheadedness when standing, headaches, brief stints of sleep paralysis, and brain fog. Davis says sometimes she has to plan for hours to complete simple tasks, adding that the condition clouds her thinking, making concentration a constant struggle. “I have to prepare just to have a shower as the [exhaustion] never dissipates,” she explained. “I’ll sleep 10, 12, sometimes even 14 hours and still wake up feeling like I pulled an all-nighter.” Davis started showing symptoms as a child, noting that her mom recalls having to put her down for a nap more often than not. She was always more tired than her friends and family, which affected her daily life, and soon, her confidence. “Ever since I was a little kid, sleep and I haven’t got along,” she shared. “It wasn’t just like having the occasional late night. It was a constant, bone-deep exhaustion that often blurred the edge of my vision.” “I’d sit down in theater class, excited to do my favorite lesson and suddenly my memory would blur,” Davis continued. “The feeling of sudden exhaustion became a tell-tale sign that I was about to lose consciousness.” Davis said her fatigue increased in high school and she’d fall asleep in class, sometimes even having to leave to take a nap. “I routinely stumbled to the side in tap dance, slumped to the floor, unable to remain upright, and there were countless times when I felt unsafe,” Davis remembered. “It was embarrassing, and I didn’t know what the problem was.” After seeing countless doctors who allegedly called her “lazy” and “careless,” she became fed up and contacted a specialist. The specialist suggested taking part in a sleep study, which required her to slumber for 14 consecutive hours. The results showed her body never entered a deep state of sleep that’s needed for proper rest. In 2017, her condition was confirmed. “I was practically bathing in coffee before I got an answer, and I felt like my struggles were seen as personal failings,” Davis sighed. “Learning what was wrong wasn’t just a lightbulb moment, it was more like a series of flickering lights leading me forward through a dark tunnel.” While she finally had an answer, she struggled to manage the condition. But then, in 2021, the first medication for idiopathic hypersomnia was approved by the Food and Drug Administration for adult use. Davis is in the process of going through another sleep study so she can begin the Xywav treatment. Now, she’s sharing her story to raise awareness about the sleep disorder and encourage others to seek proper medical attention. “It wasn’t an easy journey and it still isn’t, but having a name for the struggle I’ve been trying to grapple with for so long has been a lifeline,” Davis recounted. “It’s given me the language to explain my experiences, empowered me to advocate for myself, and equipped me to fight for a better quality of life,” she added.

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A Southwest Boeing 737 lost engine cover during takeoff, FAA is investigating

A Southwest Airlines flight returned to Denver International Airport after losing an engine cowling that struck a wing flap during takeoff, the Federal Aviation Administration said. Customers on the flight were put on another plane and were scheduled to arrive at their Houston destination three hours late. Mechanical problems have added to FAA scrutiny of the aviation industry in recent months. An engine cowling fell off of a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-800 and struck a wing flap during takeoff from Denver International Airport, the Federal Aviation Administration said Sunday. The FAA said Southwest Flight 3695 was on its way to Houston’s William P. Hobby Airport and safely returned to the gate at 8:15 a.m. local time. Southwest said customers on the flight transferred to a different aircraft and were scheduled to arrive at their destination three hours late. “Our Maintenance teams are reviewing the aircraft,” Southwest said. The FAA said it is investigating the incident. Southwest didn’t immediately respond when asked when the plane and engine last underwent maintenance. In response to a request for comment, Boeing pointed to Southwest’s statement. The cowling loss comes as the FAA investigates a separate Southwest incident in March. One of its flights strayed off course and flew close to the air traffic control tower at LaGuardia Airport as it attempted a landing in New York. The plane is an older model of the Boeing 737 than the Max jets. Boeing is under heightened regulatory scrutiny after a January incident when a door plug blew off a nearly new 737 Max 9 when the Alaska Airlines flight was at 16,000 feet, causing a near-catastrophe. Boeing’s quality control issues have spiraled into safety concerns, slowing deliveries of new Max aircraft. Big Boeing customers like Southwest and United say the issues have affected their growth plans. The long-awaited FAA certification of its 737 Max 7 and Max 10 models is also behind previous schedules. Boeing CEO Dave Calhoun last month said that he would step down by year’s end, and Boeing replaced its chairman and chief executive of its commercial airplane unit.

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