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America’s Worst Time Zone

I get meeting times wrong all the time. I mean to schedule an hour earlier or an hour later, but then I get mixed up. The problem is, I always have to compensate for where I am, which is in the city of St. Louis, Missouri. Greetings from the lonely, dismal heart of central standard: a land before time and, also, a land after it. To those of you who work and live in a proper, respectable time zone such as eastern or Pacific, the full extent of my shame will be difficult to fathom. “Oh, yeah, I’m in central time, actually,” I say, as if acknowledging a terrible skin condition or an inconvenient food allergy. Everyone is polite, of course. “Ah, okay, got it,” they reply, as we all scramble to adjust our calendars. This is not respect. It is pity. I moved here from eastern, which is the nation’s anchor time zone. I say that not because of its affiliation with New York City or Washington, D.C., but because almost half the U.S. population holds to its authority. Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Atlanta are on eastern time, along with almost all of Florida and Michigan, the whole of Ohio, and other less notable places made more notable simply by their participation in the most normal time in America. Eastern time starts the day; it sets the pace for the nation. The stock market opens on Wall Street, corporate lawyers file into Back Bay offices, spoons swirl café cubanos in Miami. It’s morning again in America. On the other coast, where it’s three hours earlier, nobody cares. Such is the glory of the Pacific time zone, which houses a smaller sliver of the country’s population—just 16 percent or so. Some West Coasters—surfers, almond farmers, theme-park vendors—may be up during the eastern a.m. hours, though not because investment bankers or media professionals compel them. But the whole Atlantic Seaboard morning has elapsed by the time that most Pacific-time professionals have stumbled to the office, smoothies in hand. They will always be behind, no matter what they do. This is not a disadvantage; it’s a lifestyle. The mountain time zone is in some ways central’s partner. Its residents share our temporal confusion, living earlier than most Americans but later than some others. But the region’s sparseness spares it more embarrassment. The mountain zone is mostly empty space: Wyoming, Montana, New Mexico. Only 6 percent of the nation lives there, and almost one-third of those people are confined to Arizona, a state that doesn’t observe daylight saving time and thus LARPs as California for half the year. And unlike central time, mountain time gets to have a name that evokes thin, clear air and rugged individualism. Here in central, we get nothing. Our name isn’t bad, but it isn’t cool. It’s just … middling. A center forms a foundation, but it can never be exceptional. Such is the fate of the average people who get averaged out within our time zone’s borders. Central time afflicts St. Louis but also Dallas, Houston, Chicago, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Memphis, and New Orleans; in all, its victims live in the whole or parts of 20 states. We’re stuck together in this in-between, always just a little bit too early and a fair amount too late, our heads turning back and forth toward our betters on the coasts. This isn’t just another form of grousing about being overlooked. Flyover country’s cultural and economic woes, or its benefits, are separate from the indignities of central time. Nobody needs to visit you in Tulsa or Little Rock to coordinate a call or set a deadline. But plenty of the people living here are obligated by professional or personal ties to connect with the many others who might crisscross the skies above our homes. This creates a special and profound malaise. Millions of us live this way, caught between morning and afternoon. We do mathematics. When should we meet? Let me think, I’m two hours ahead of you, and so-and-so is one more ahead of me, so N your time is N+3 theirs, which makes me N+3-1. So-and-so’s day already started in Manhattan, and I’m behind; it feels more like I’m arriving late than living on a different clock. Okay, now I’m free, but it’s still too early for you guys in Santa Cruz. Coordination is accommodation. To coordinate in space, one makes room—a seat at the table. To coordinate in time, one clears calendars. Everyone, no matter their time zone, performs some version of this daily work. But in central time, that work feels, well, central to our lives. We can never be on time, not really, because our time is not our own. It’s always someone else’s: two hours ahead, an hour behind, today, tomorrow, and forever.

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Rafah exodus reaches 360,000 as UN underscores $2.8 billion aid appeal for Gaza, West Bank

“Nearly 360,000 people have fled Rafah since the first evacuation order a week ago,” the UN agency said in a post on X, referencing leafleting by the Israeli military ordering those in eastern Rafah to leave their shelters. In another alert, UNRWA warned of ongoing “restricted humanitarian access” to and across the Gaza Strip that was now “a matter of life or death” for Gazans already suffering “relentless bombardments and food insecurity”. The development comes one week since Israel moved ahead with its military offensive in Rafah, seizing control of the Gaza side of the Rafah border crossing and Kerem Shalom crossing. “We immediately and urgently need safe passage for humanitarian aid and workers,” the UN agency insisted, amid fresh reports of more clashes and shelling in Jabalia refugee camp in the north of the enclave. “Bombardments and other evacuation orders have created more displacement and fear for thousands of families” in the north, UNRWA said. “There’s nowhere to go. There’s NO safety without a ceasefire.” The UN agency also reported on Monday that another staff member had been killed in Gaza, bringing the total number of staff killed in the war to 189. The individual – a 53-year-old senior projects officer – was believed to have died in an Israeli strike in the central town of Deir Al Balah, after leaving Rafah. “He leaves behind a wife and four children,” the agency said. Funding appeal In a related development, the UN again highlighted its $2.8 billion appeal to support more than three million people in Gaza and the West Bank over the next eight months. “For months, women and children have been killed at a rate that exceeds any war in this century. And those who’ve escaped death and injury now risk losing their lives because of a lack of food, safe water, medicine and healthcare,” said Joyce Msuya, Assistant-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator. Speaking in Kuwait, Ms. Msuya described how every day, “scores of women give birth in horrifying conditions, often without anesthesia or medical aid, as bombs explode around them”. “Mothers watch their babies die in their arms because they don’t have enough milk to keep them alive. And children are dying because they don’t have enough food or water.” So much can still be done After more than seven months of war, at least 35,000 people have been killed, according to the Gaza health authorities. Another 70,000 more are wounded or missing, with many more trapped under the rubble. Continuing funding is needed urgently to help those who depend on humanitarian aid to survive, the OCHA senior official said, insisting that even in the absence of a ceasefire, “there is still much we can do given the right conditions”. She noted: “We are in daily access negotiations with the parties. We are coordinating the humanitarian response…We have pulled people out of the rubble and repatriated the bodies of aid workers, including those working for World Central Kitchen and Médecins Sans Frontières who were killed serving those in need.” The OCHA official’s comments came as the aid coordination office reported new demolitions of Palestinian buildings in Al’Arrub Camp in the West Bank governorate of Hebron. Latest data from the OCHA online portal indicates that 435 structures have been damaged or destroyed across the West Bank so far this year, displacing 824 people.

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Countless lives at stake in Sudan’s El Fasher, warn UN aid teams

According to UN emergency relief chief Martin Griffiths, a “strike” damaged the roof of the intensive care unit at Southern Hospital in El Fasher Town – the only working hospital in North Darfur state – where medical supplies are running dangerously low. Some 800,000 people live in and around El Fasher Town where “countless lives are at stake.Sudan is at a tipping point,” Mr. Griffiths said in a message on X late Sunday. Key city at stake In an update on the hostilities, the UN aid coordination office (OCHA) reported that dozens of civilians had been killed in renewed heavy fighting last Friday between the Sudanese Armed Forces and Rapid Support Force (RSF) soldiers in and around the city – the last one in North Darfur not yet under RSF control, it has been reported. “The clashes, including airstrikes and the use of heavy weapons, started mid-morning in the eastern part of El Fasher Town and continued until 6.30pm,” said OCHA. “The clashes extended into the centre of the town, the outskirts of the main market and into neighbourhoods, resulting in civilian deaths and injuries.” Before the latest bloodshed, humanitarians warned that months of escalating violence around El Fasher Town had been behind “persistent” aid access obstructions that had hampered the sustained flow of aid and basic commodities, “pushing people to the brink of famine”. Nearly 25 million need help In Darfur alone, some nine million people need humanitarian assistance today, but a staggering 24.8 million across Sudan – almost one in two people in the country – now require help from the UN and aid partners. The latest assessment of hunger levels across Sudan from late March were already alarming, even before this latest escalation. It revealed that 17.7 million people – more than one-third of the country’s population – faced acute food insecurity (IPC3) or worse, with level three indicating “Crisis” and five indicating “Famine”. Of these, 4.9 million people “are on the brink of famine”, experts at the globally respected Integrated Food Security Phase Classification initiative warned. “Nearly nine out of 10 people in IPC4 are in conflict-affected areas in Darfur, Kordofan, Khartoum and Jazirah. With the onset of the lean season from April onwards, food insecurity is expected to further worsen,” their assessment noted. Millions of lives upended According to the UN migration agency, IOM, about 570,000 people have been displaced in North Darfur state in the last 13 months and 6.7 million have been internally displaced, while 1.8 million have fled across Sudan’s border, UN refugee agency (UNHCR) data shows. Before reports of renewed clashes on Sunday in and around El Fasher Town, OCHA said that large numbers of people had moved from the east and northwest to the south. Media reports cited the medical director of the El Fasher Town hospital describing that patients were being treated in any available space within the facility, including on balconies. Echoing concerns over damage to medical equipment and supplies, the director indicated that a key supply line to the rest of Sudan had been cut off by the RSF.

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‘Untold harm to nature’ from wildlife trafficking, warns UN crime agency

“Wildlife crime inflicts untold harm upon nature and it also jeopardizes livelihoods, public health, good governance and our planet’s ability to fight climate change,” said Ghada Waly, UNODC Executive Director. The agency’s World Wildlife Crime Report takes stock of the efforts to counter poaching worldwide. Although there are positive signs that trafficking of some iconic species has decreased, including elephants and rhinoceroses – thanks to the dismantling of large trafficking networks and the suppression of demand in key markets – the overall picture is still gloomy for thousands of protected plants and animals. Scope and harm Wildlife crime has a profound global impact whose ramifications aren’t always clearly understood, UNODC insists. Latest data on seized trafficked species from 2015 to 2021 across 162 countries and territories indicates that illegal trade affects roughly 4,000 plant and animal species with approximately 3,250 listed under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). Over the reporting period, law enforcement bodies confiscated 13 million items totalling more than 16,000 tonnes. Despite its significant role in driving the extinction of numerous rare species such as orchids, succulents, reptiles, fish, birds, and mammals, wildlife trafficking often goes unnoticed by the public, according to UN experts in wildlife crime prevention. For example, illegal collection for trade is believed to have led to the recent extinction of several succulent plant species in South Africa. It has also caused substantial depletion of rare orchids, with newly discovered species quickly targeted by poachers and buyers. In addition to directly threatening species populations, wildlife trafficking can disrupt delicate ecosystems and their functions, particularly undermining their ability to mitigate climate change. Furthermore, experts in human and animal health have consistently raised concerns about the disease risks associated with wildlife trade in recent decades. These concerns encompass the direct transmission of diseases to humans from live animals, plants and wildlife products including bushmeat, as well as broader threats to wildlife populations, ecosystems and food production systems. A powerful enemy The analysis of over 140,000 wildlife species traffic seizures from 2015 to 2021 reveals the intricate involvement of powerful organized crime groups in exploiting fragile ecosystems worldwide, from the Amazon to the Golden Triangle (broadly encompassing northeastern Myanmar, northwestern Thailand and northern Laos). Transnational criminal networks engage in various stages of the trade chain, including export, import, brokering, storage, breeding and selling to customers. Traffickers continuously adapt their methods and routes to evade detection and prosecution, exploiting regulatory loopholes and enforcement weaknesses, UNODC said. Corruption further exacerbates the plight of plants and animals, with officials often turning a blind eye to violations. Despite this, wildlife crime cases are rarely prosecuted under corruption charges, allowing perpetrators to escape punishment. “To address this crime, we must match the adaptability and agility of the illegal wildlife trade. This demands strong, targeted interventions at both the demand and the supply side of the trafficking chain, efforts to reduce criminal incentives and profits, and greater investment in data, analysis, and monitoring capacities,” UNODC’s Ghada Waly said. There’s hope Recent analyses of illegal trafficking in elephants and rhinoceroses have demonstrated that a comprehensive strategy which addresses both demand and supply has yielded good results. But this approach must also be combined with a heightened policy focus, stricter market regulations and targeted law enforcement actions against major traffickers. There have been significant decreases in poaching, seizures, and market prices for these species over the past decade, UNODC noted.

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Schoolboy says ‘good looking’ maths teacher, 30, told him his mother ‘better not find out’ after…

A schoolboy told police that the morning after he allegedly had sex with his maths teacher, she warned him that his mother had ‘better not find out that it was me’. Boy A also said that after they had unprotected sex for a second time, he told his teacher: ‘I hope to God you don’t get pregnant.’ He said after she drove him to the Trafford Centre earlier in the day, Joynes bought him a Gucci belt which the court has heard cost £345. ‘It’s a lot of money,’ he told police in his video interview. ‘I didn’t really understand the reason why she did it.’ She then drove to her one-bed apartment, he said, recalling thinking it felt ‘a bit weird’ as they climbed the stairs. Initially Joynes dealt with a load of washing. Both then sat using their mobile phones before going into her darkened bedroom after he asked: ‘Are we going in there or staying in here?’ They started kissing before both stripped naked and he had sex with a ‘moaning’ Joynes on the bed. Boy A said having sex with his teacher seemed ‘weird’ and ‘just crazy’. It lasted about five minutes before he went and showered, he told police. However after lying in bed together talking about ‘random stuff’ – during which she warmed herself with a hairdryer because she felt cold and the radiator wasn’t working – they had sex again, he said. Boy A said it was ‘probably’ him who suggested having sex for a second time, saying Joynes replied: ‘I don’t mind, whatever you want.’ They did not discuss protection or contraception, he said, but afterwards he says he told Joynes: ‘I hope to God you don’t get pregnant.’ He said Joynes left early the next morning to spend the day with her parents, and that he awoke at about 11.30am to a missed call from his mother. Boy A said he told Joynes over Snapchat that his mother might become suspicious about where he had spent the night. He said the teacher replied: ‘She’d better not find out that it was me.’ Earlier jurors heard how the schoolboy had told police that ‘anyone in my position’ would have agreed to go back to their ‘good looking’ maths teacher’s apartment for sex. Rebecca Joynes’ appearance was ‘definitely’ the talk of pupils in her class, the boy said in a police interview played to jurors on the second day of the 30-year-old’s trial for sex offences. She allegedly went on to have sex with a second pupil around 30 times while on bail awaiting trial in relation to the first teenager, becoming pregnant by him and having his baby. Dressed in a white blouse, Joynes arrived to her trial with a pink baby bonnet tucked into her black trousers. It’s the second time she was pictured bringing the small item of children’s clothing into Manchester Crown Court, having taken it into the dock with her on Tuesday. Today she sat scribbled notes on a paper pad as jurors were told how the 15-year-old – referred to as Boy A – told a detective the pair had arranged to meet up after she told him the first ten digits of her mobile phone number. Boy A said he and his friends had previously jokingly pestered her for it and asked her if she was in a relationship. He tried calling each possible permutation for the final number as the Monday morning maths class went on, and when he reached four ‘I heard her phone go off’, he said. Boy A said his recollection was that he sent her a message that evening reading simply ‘Hi’, but got no response. At a maths lesson later in the week, Boy A said he sent her a further text along the lines of: ‘You ignored me.’ This time he said Joynes responded, and they began messaging ‘properly’, eventually arranging to meet up and go to her Salford Quays apartment after school on the Friday. Jurors were yesterday told that Joynes accepts picking Boy A up in her Audi, buying him a £345 Gucci belt from Selfridges in the Trafford Centre, and then taking him to her apartment where he stayed the night in October 2021. But she denies sexual activity took place. She also claims her sexual relationship with Boy B – which ended when she told him she was pregnant – only began after he had turned 16. Asked by the detective who Joynes was, Boy A replied: ‘She was my maths teacher.’ The teenager said Joynes was ‘obviously good-looking’, saying it was ‘definitely’ something he and his classmates talked about. ‘Before I even had her [as a teacher] everyone would be speaking about her, saying she’s good-looking, whatever,’ he added. Asked why he thought Joynes had given him all but one digit of her phone in class, Boy A replied: ‘It sounds as if she probably wanted me to message her. ‘That’s how it comes across.’ Boy A said he told a friend he was in contact with their teacher, and at his suggestion added her as a Snapchat contact because ‘messages delete’. But he said when Joynes first suggested meeting up, he replied ‘you’re deffo like joking’. However he said Joynes replied that she ‘literally wasn’t’ joking. Asked what he had expected to happen after she picked him up, Boy A replied: ‘To be honest, I wasn’t expecting that to happen, what happened. ‘I didn’t expect that to happen, but it did. ‘I feel like anyone in my position when we arranged to meet would – if you’re my age and in my year. ‘She is good-looking.’ He said after school on the Friday he packed ‘my stuff to stay over – shorts, T-shirt, sliders, clean underwear’ before she collected him from a row of shops in her white Audi. Later, the court heard how Joynes allegedly told Boy A ‘oh shut up’ when he told her ‘I’m not old enough’. The conversation is alleged to have happened during a trip in Joynes’ car and was revealed during an interview with police. Boy A an officer about a conversation on the journey and said: ‘She said something about driving. I went, ‘I wouldn’t know because I’m not old enough,’ and she said, ‘Oh shut up’ laughing, said something like, ‘Stop saying that’ but laughing.’ Joynes denies two counts of sexual activity with Boy A, two counts of sexual activity with Boy B, and two counts of sexual activity with Boy B while being a person in a position of trust. The two-week trial continues.

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Go woke, go broke? Britain’s first vegan hotel which offers meat-free haggis, feather-free duvets…

Britain’s ‘first vegan hotel’ has gone on the market for nearly £1million, but the owners deny it is because of a downturn in business. Saorsa 1875 is an 11-bedroom hotel in a detached Victorian villa in Pitlochry, Highland Perthshire. It is known for being the first in the UK to be 100 per cent vegan with a ‘high quality’ bar, restaurant and lounge areas that offer a selection of plant-based meals. The hotel has been running as a getaway for vegetarians and vegans, taking up a ‘unique’ position in the hospitality sector. Owner Sandra Mclaren-Stewart confirmed the hotel will stay open until a buyer is found. Saorsa 1875 is an 11-bedroom hotel in a detached Victorian villa in Pitlochry, Highland Perthshire (pictured) The hotel has been running as a getaway for vegetarians and vegans, taking up a ‘unique’ position in the hospitality sector. Pictured: The interior of the hotel It has gone through extensive upgrades to provide boutique-style hotel rooms. The garden features short woodland walks and hideaways to relax in. Ms Mclaren-Stewart said: ‘Bookings into 2024 and even 2025 have been great. ‘It’s not a case that we’re selling up because of a downturn in business, we’re selling because we’re moving on to a new and exciting project. ‘We’ve tried to deliver something different and I think it’s been taken on really well. ‘There’s no judgment here, we always want to knock your socks off and show what we can do. ‘We hope someone will come along and do what we’re doing and embrace it. ‘It’s been a very exciting and fast-paced five years.’ Guests in the five years Ms Mclaren-Stewart has owned the hotel have included comedian Alan Carr and other celebrities. There is also a large yurt, which is ideal to use as a function space or for yoga and wellness retreats. The hotel is listed on Graham & Sibbald’s website for offers around £950,000. Alistair Letham, a hotel and leisure consultant with the firm, commented: ‘Saorsa 1875 is an exceptional hotel delightfully refurbished to a great boutique hotel standard in a wonderful trading location. ‘The current business model sets Saorsa 1875 on its own pedestal and new owners can continue and expand on what has been created with the vegan business; or very easily open out the business to a wider offering.’ According to Saorsa’s website, the hotel offers tasting menus which are ‘completely plant-based and showcase local, seasonal, and foraged produce’. The 19th-century hotel has 1.8 acres of land.

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Pictured: American Pitbull owner, 27, whose three dogs mauled a woman, 24, in a park

The owner of three dogs, including a banned American Pitbull Terrier, who mauled a woman in a park has been pictured for the first time. Lakaydia Reynolds, 24, was walking through Abbots Park in Lambeth, south London, when Darren Massey’s dogs set upon her. Ms Reynolds was left needing plastic surgery after the incident on June 6, which saw her pinned to the ground as the dogs bit and scratched her face, legs and arm. Speaking on Good Morning Britain, Ms Reynolds revealed she was still in ‘excruciating pain’ after receiving nerve damage to her arm, and that she is unable to feel or move half of the limb. Now, Massey, 27, has been seen attending Croydon Magistrates Court today where he admitted one count of owning a dangerous dog. Massey was due to be sentenced at the Old Bailey last month but the hearing was adjourned for technical reasons. The prosecution is trying to decide whether he should be charged with three counts of owning a dangerous dog or just one. The terrifying attack, which took place in broad daylight, was seen by a passerby who filmed it. The video was later posted online. Ms Reynolds was hospitalised for a week and she required plastic surgery and nerve damage to her lip. She lost the use of her right arm and was unable to play rugby or her violin. It is unclear which dogs actually caused injury to Ms Reynolds but one of them has been put down. Massey earlier told the court: ‘[The dogs] have been confiscated. One of them has been put down.’ He was bailed to appear back at Croydon Magistrates Court on 29 May. In October last year Ms Reynolds told the BBC: ‘It turned out to be the worst day of my entire life. ‘I was screaming, asking for help, asking him for help. ‘It was just me against these three dogs. The owner himself actually started asking for help, which made me even more scared. ‘I thought, if he can’t control his dogs, then who can? ‘I had to loosen my hoodie and take my hoodie off, and tear my arm out of the dog’s mouth. ‘If I didn’t get away within the split second that I did, I knew those dogs were going to kill me. ‘I’ve been impacted mentally, socially, emotionally and physically,’ she added. ‘One of the most difficult things for me is the fact that I can’t do anything myself, so I have to rely on people to help me.’ She told the BBC that her full prognosis would only be known in 18 months, as that is the length of time it usually takes for nerve damage to heal.

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Kyle Walker and wife Annie Kilner are striving to ‘work through their differences’ as they head…

Kyle Walker and wife Annie Kilner are working through their difference as they attempt to reach a point of reconciliation after the birth of their newborn last month, MailOnline can reveal. The pair attended a party at Wayne and Coleen’s mansion in Cheshire over the Bank Holiday and it was revealed that the couple are trying to do ‘normal family stuff’ in a hope of repairing their relationship. The couple, who recently welcomed their fourth son, have faced turmoil since it was revealed that Kyle is the father of both Lauryn Goodman’s children. The source told MailOnline: ‘Annie and Kyle are working through their differences as they navigate life with a newborn. They enjoyed the day with other footballers and their families plus a crowd of other famous faces. ‘The pair are, understandably, not back how they were, but connecting with friends and being together doing normal family stuff is helping towards their reconciliation.’ The pair spent time as a family at Coleen and Wayne Rooney’s mega mansion this weekend as they put the latest Lauryn scandal behind them. Meanwhile another source reported that Annie, 31, and Kyle, 33, were said to be ‘frosty’ with each other as The Sun reported: ‘They are doing things as a family again. ‘But it’s not all smooth sailing and there was clearly still a bit of tension. Everyone was letting their hair down, having a laugh and few drinks but it was obvious Kyle is still in the dog house. ‘There weren’t particularly lovey dovey but it’s a step in the right direction for them as a couple.’ The Rooney’s welcomed friends including commentator Darren Fletcher, Middlesbrough coach Michael Carrick, Everton’s Jordan Pickford and former Aston Villa manager Steve Bruce to their £20million mansion. They also extended the invitation to members of Girth N Turf FC, who are one of the virtual EA Sports FC 24 Pro Clubs. It comes after it was reported that Kyle is said to be considering ditching Manchester City and the Premier League in favour of a move to Saudi Arabia at the end of the season, according to The Sun. The City star was in talks with Bayern Munich over a potential exit last year before signing a new contract extension that keeps him at the reigning Premier League and European champions until 2026. The media storm focusing on his relationship could pave the way for a summer departure from European football and the City full-back has been in discussion with former team-mate Riyad Mahrez over moving to the Middle East. Riyad joined Saudi Pro League side Al Ahli after winning the Treble under Pep Guardiola and has been offering expert guidance to Walker on life in the nation. He moved there with wife Taylor Ward and their young daughter last year, with the former initially upset at leaving England in favour of Saudi Arabia. Taylor later claimed she felt more comfortable after seeing popular food chain Nandos had premises in the country. Should Kyle depart then he would be the highest-profile England player to move to the league – who are continuing their approach of attracting top talent by offering huge salaries. Jordan Henderson previously left the Premier League for Saudi Arabia last year before later returning to Europe with Ajax in January. Kyle is understood to be ‘very happy’ at City as they continue their quest for a record-breaking fourth consecutive Premier League title and prepare to take on derby rivals Man United in the FA Cup final for the second season in a row. His wife, Annie, is also reportedly in favour of departing England in search of a fresh start overseas, sources reportedly told The Sun. Conversations with Riyad are said to have focused primarily on the different clubs in the Saudi Pro League and the lifestyle for foreign players moving to the oil-rich kingdom. Kyle was delighted with the information he was given by his former colleague and will be weighing up all available options once the season has concluded. His departure would mark a huge blow for Guardiola who masterminded the player’s move to the Etihad from Tottenham in 2017 for an initial £47m. Kyle’s rep told MailOnline: ‘Kyle, like many footballers, has considered his career after the Premiere League and England commitments. Conversations about a move were in relation to his future and not something he is considering any time soon. He is immensely proud to captain his club and play for his country’. Meanwhile MailOnline also revealed on Friday that Kyle has returned to the family home to spend time with his children, just four months after he was kicked out by his wife. Annie was heavily pregnant at the time with their fourth child when she heard the shocking news of her husband’s infidelity. Kyle was ordered to pack his bags and leave their £3.5 million mansion in Prestbury, Cheshire. He relocated to a home close by, paying £20,000 per month rent as the couple’s marriage hit the rocks. Kyle is still living in the rental property but has been spending time with his children back at the family home and helping Annie around the house. The source said: ‘It would be an understatement to say that he needs to get back into Annie’s good books and he’s doing his best by making himself more useful around the house. But there are people within her circle who feel that she’s taken him back too quickly. ‘But her hormones are all over the place and she’s decided that its worth putting in the effort to save their marriage. A lot of women wouldn’t have done this but at the end of the day, it’s her choice.’ Annie, 30 gave birth last month with the Manchester City and England footballer by her side. The past few months have been a rollercoaster for Annie, after she discovered in December last year that her sportsman husband had fathered a second child with Lauryn with Walker moving out of their home a few weeks later in January. Prior to the arrival of their fourth child, who they plan to name Rezon, the couple also share sons Roman, 11, Riaan, seven, and Reign, five.

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Jewish mom outraged over anti-Israel protesters yelling at NY school: ‘They told my kids their parents were complicit in genocide’

A Jewish mother was left stunned after anti-Israel protesters shut down the road near her children’s upstate New York elementary school and shouted at the kids that their parents were “complicit in genocide” and “baby killers.” Bryce Gruber, of Woodstock, said she had trouble coming up with answers for her kids about the things they heard when dozens of protesters descended on their small town on Tuesday to target the Ametek Rotron defense manufacturing company, which is based down the road from the Woodstock Elementary School. “They were screaming at the kids and anyone who tried to get across or got near them,” Gruber told The Post Wednesday. “They told my kids that their parents were complicit in genocide, that they’re baby killers.” Gruber, a mother of five, shared her encounter with the protesters on Instagram, revealing that the elementary school did not allow students outside for recess over the protest. While Gruber was in disbelief that such a demonstration broke out in her small town of about 6,000 people, what was even more concerning was that her own neighbors came out in support of it. “They were cheering them on, shouting, ‘We love you,’” Gruber said. “That was the worst part.” Gruber added that when she confronted the protesters, a local man had been recording her and her 7-year-old son and 5-year-old daughter, warning them that he would upload their images on a “Zionist Jew watchlist.” “It was all really disturbing,” Grubber said. “And not a single person has reached out to our Jewish community to say something or check in afterwards.” The demonstrators, who identified themselves as “Hudson Valley Neighbors,” had chained themselves together and blocked Route 375 to the Ametek building, alleging that the company developed parts of the weapons being supplied to Israel from the US, the Mid Hudson News reported. The protesters held up a large banner that read, “Ametek Rotron Manufactures Genocide.” Lily Jones, of Queens, identified herself as a spokesperson for the group and told the local outlet that the war in Gaza has nothing to do with the Oct. 7 massacre that left more than 1,200 people dead. She also refused to acknowledge Hamas’ known goal of eradicating Israel to establish a Palestinian state. Despite their name, the group was mostly made up of residents from Ulster County, Hudson Valley One reports. Town Supervisor Bill McKenna told reporters at the scene that while the demonstrators have a right to protest, they could not block access to private property. Several protesters were eventually arrested in the afternoon and taken to New York State police headquarters in Hurley for booking, according to Woodstock police. The Onteora School District said it had stationed a school resource officer at Woodstock Elementary “to ensure that everyone felt safe.” Ametek Rotron did not immediately respond to The Post’s request for comment.

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NYC’s hottest new hamburger is from a gas station

It will really fill you up. The tiny hamburger joint Smacking Burger has opened inside of a working gas station — which happens to be the last one in Manhattan below 14th Street. On a recent Saturday, the owners said they served some 800 customers. The four-pump Mobil on the narrow corner of Eighth Avenue and Horatio Street has a small wedge of a convenience mart. When you walk in, there’s a typical cashier to the left. To the right, past a shelf of chips and adjacent to coolers of drinks, Smacking Burger occupies a tight triangle. In that cramped space, station owner Tommy Hondros and his girlfriend Elizabeth Torres, along with two employees, take orders, fry fries, and cook burgers on a sizzling flattop grill. “It’s hectic,” Hondros, 37, told The Post. “We’re trying to get everyone fed.” He and Torres, 32, started serving smashburgers — burgers pressed into thin, crispy-edged patties — out of the station at the end of April. “People say they love that feeing of pulling up to a gas station and getting a burger. You can’t get that anywhere else [in the city],” said Hondros, who owns three other gas stations, all in Brooklyn. “I’ve been pumping gas since age nine,” the Bayridge native added. “My father had gas stations forever.” He fondly recalls how fuel stops used to house unique burger joints and wanted to recreate that experience. “I wanted to get that old-school feeling. There’s nothing but Burger King now,” he said. Smacking Burger definitely has its own vibe. On a recent Wednesday, a dozen or so customers — mostly young men in the sporty vests and high-performance work pants that signal careers in tech — lined up outside before the noon opening. Inside, tracks by Tyla and Dua Lipa offered a summery soundtrack as people waited up to an hour for their meals. The 1997 flick “Good Burger,” starring Kenan Thompson, played silently on a monitor overhead. “Kenan’s a customer, but he hasn’t tried the burger yet,” Hondros said. Six different burger variations are on offer. There are also sides such as “Famous Fries” ($7.99) loaded with beef crumbles, American cheese, pickles, “smack sauce” — a riff on a pink burger sauce, elevated with dill — and a creamy take on chimichurri. The special sauces, which include a funky horseradish option, are notably delicious and made in-house by Torres. “I be cooking every day in the house, I just love it,” said Torres, who grew up in a family of restaurant owners and has studied at various culinary schools. Menu standout burgers include “The Big Smack” ($8.99) with two patties, American cheese, shredded lettuce and Smack sauce on a Martin’s sesame bun, and “The Truff” ($8.99) — a single patty, grilled mushrooms, Swiss cheese and truffle-tinged hot sauce. Lucas Flores Piran, a 38-year-old film director who lives down the street from gas station, raved about the Big Smack and said it was worth his 40-minute wait. (His goldendoodle Apollo also enjoyed a $3 puppy patty.) “It’s delicious, hearty, flavorful, nice umami,” he enthused. “Better than the Motz burger,” he added, referencing Hamburger America, the restaurant opened by burger scholar George Motz late last year. “Don’t tell George.” Chris Melbourne, a 35-year-old who lives in Brooklyn and works at Apple’s nearby offices, loved the smack sauce and the juiciness of the patty. “I definitely would go back for more,” he said.

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