Home » 2024 » 05 » 12
Categorieslatest

Airbnb Hosts Say Their Guests ‘Rave’ About This Top-Rated Sheet Set, and It’s on Sale for $12

Nothing makes drifting off to dreamland more impossible than climbing into bed and finding starchy, scratchy sheets. If you’ve been itching (pun intended) to upgrade your bedding with super soft sheets, there’s a set from Amazon that’s ready to cocoon you in comfort throughout the night. The sheets in question? The Danjor Linens Sheet Set. The machine-washable sheets are woven in breathable, lightweight microfiber, which is double-brushed for softness and is anti-pilling and wrinkle-resistant (a plus when you’re tossing and turning). The moisture-wicking and temperature-regulating fabric is ideal for sweaty sleepers, hot summer nights, and cool winter evenings alike. And, since the set is currently on sale for $12, that means you’re only paying $2 apiece. Danjor Linens 6-Piece Queen Sheet Set in Gray, $12 with coupon The set includes a fitted sheet, one flat sheet, and four pillowcases. The pillowcases are finished with stitched edges for a clean look, while the fitted sheet has a deep-pocket design for a secure fit over thicker mattresses. There are 13 colors to choose from, including neutrals like white and taupe, and more fashion-forward hues like lavender and pink. The sheets are available in sizes twin through California king. Discounts vary depending on size and style. They’ve garnered a perfect rating from over 100,000 Amazon shoppers (yes, you read that huge number right), and more than 8,000 have purchased them in the past month alone. Many of those five-star ratings come from Airbnb hosts, who say their guests are satisfied with the sheets’ quality. “I have an Airbnb and everyone raves about how comfortable the bedding is,” one reviewer said, adding, “I swear it’s these sheets. [They’re] so soft and they last forever.” “We run an Airbnb and we get multiple comments on the softness of our sheets,” another customer said. “[They] often ask where we got them and [say] that they like them better than their own at home.” Additional hosts noted the sheets “held up through numerous washes” and are “comfortable and luxurious.” Ready to burrow into softness and comfort? Snap up the Danjor Linens Queen Sheet Set while it’s on sale for up to 47 percent off at Amazon. Keep scrolling to shop more colors. Danjor Linens Queen Sheet Set in White, $25 (Save 26%) Danjor Linens 6-Piece Queen Sheet Set in Spa Blue, $25 (Save 18%) Danjor Linens 6-Piece Queen Sheet Set in Lavender, $28 (Save 20%)

Categorieslatest

Mickey Guyton 'Didn't Even Think It Was Real' When Beyoncé Thanked Her Before Cowboy Carter Release (Exclusive)

Mickey Guyton thought it was a prank call when she heard that Beyoncé wanted to contact her.“I had some people call me. They were like, ‘Hey, Beyoncé wants to get ahold of you.’ I’m like, ‘Wait, what?’” the country music star told PEOPLE as she attended Keep Memory Alive’s 27th Annual Power of Love Gala in Las Vegas to honor Blake Shelton on Friday, May 10.Beyoncé’s intentions were real, and she wanted to honor Guyton, 40, for her contributions to country music, particularly as a Black artist, just before releasing her Cowboy Carter country album.“I didn’t even think it was real. She got my address and sent me some beautiful flowers, and it really meant a lot to me,” Guyton said. Never miss a story — sign up for PEOPLE’s free daily newsletter to stay up-to-date on the best of what PEOPLE has to offer, from celebrity news to compelling human interest stories. Guyton not only got flowers, but she also received a thoughtful note from the Grammy winner.”Mickey, Thank you for opening doors for me, queen. Keep shining. Love and respect, Beyoncé,” the note read.“It was just really cool to be acknowledged,” Guyton explained to PEOPLE. “You don’t realize how when you become an activist, which was never my intention, it comes with a price.” “Mental health can be one of those things, and to have someone like her acknowledge that and say thank you, it really, really meant a lot,” the “Better Than You Left Me” singer added. Guyton was again surrounded by music royalty as she honored Shelton, 47, on Friday.“Blake is such an incredible artist and incredible person,” she told PEOPLE. “He has such an amazing music catalog, and he’s so important to country music. I’m so glad that we get to honor him tonight.”The evening also centered on finding a cure for brain disease, which personally has a big meaning for Guyton. “It’s such a special event. My grandmother had dementia, so it hits me very, very hard. It’s genetics,” she said. “It’s in my family, and it’s hard when you see someone that you love so much going through something like that. So this is really, really, really important to me.”

Categorieslatest

Weekly Horoscope: May 12-May 18, Manifest a Miracle in the Luckiest Week of the Year

Luck favors the brave and the bold. When the stars align, doors open before us. The key to getting everything you want in life? Seize the day to create the reality you most desire. In this sense, we are working in tandem with the universe rather than sitting back idly just hoping things fall into place. This week starts off with energy that could bring shocking twists of fate and sudden surprises. Each day that follows, we’ll march toward the “Luckiest Day of the Year” on May 18. Breakthroughs, windfalls, new beginnings and gifts from the universe could come your way personally or professionally. But remember, you always have the power to “make your luck” — so take a chance, ask for a favor and reach toward a hope or dream close to your heart. Read on for what to expect this week, according to your zodiac sign. Aries (March 21 to April 19) In recent weeks, there’s been so much activity around your financial life, Aries. The days ahead will further emphasize this, but you also could hit the jackpot! Sudden shifts around income, possessions and resources could all pop up — but the key now is to strategize ways you can build your pot of gold. Consider launching a product or service, raise your rates, court a lucrative client or apply for a job with a higher salary. A big win around wealth could be at hand. Luckily, as this happens, you’ll also be feeling more confident as your sense of self-worth flourishes, too. Treat yourself and those who you love to something extra special. Taurus (April 20 to May 20) The week ahead will be like you’ve finally found the end of the rainbow, Taurus. In truth, you’ve been radically evolving since 2018, in a major growth period over the past year. A major breakthrough personally or professionally is likely to manifest before your eyes, something close to your heart and soul that will leave you positively euphoric. This is the most important week in the coming twelve years for you to plant seeds, take chances, make a promise or take action to create the life you’ve always envisioned. Luck will rain down on you in all ways like showers of gold. Make a list of your most important desires, be confident in yourself and go forth to set the world on fire. You are ready to be crowned like the royalty that you are. Your golden touch will be envied by everyone now and in the years to come. Gemini (May 21 to June 20) You may feel as if a guardian angel is carefully guiding you everywhere that you go this week, Gemini. It’s as if you keep landing in the right place at the right time. You’ll be eager to go forward and charge into new territory, but you’ll be surprised to find a visionary insight, breakthrough or intuitive hunch if you embrace stillness this week. It can be something that changes the vision of life forever. You may also find yourself able to heal a deep wound, fear or trauma this week, one from the past allowing you to find closure once and for all. Some of you may even find that someone behind the scenes has been rooting for you and secretly clicks the pieces into place to guide you to the attainment of a goal close to your heart. Cancer (June 21 to July 22) A festive and exciting period lies ahead, Cancer, and it could be one of the most celebratory periods you’ve had in years. Living your life to the fullest will be on the top of your mind, as you feel like your heart is radiating like the sun. A major aspiration may now be in reach, more money from your career could be on the table and you could find that many people who love and support you are rallying to lift you up. Yet, don’t sit back twiddling your thumbs hoping everything will fall into place! Draw up a vision board of what you want your lift to look like now and in the years ahead and ask for favors from people in your network who may be able to open doors for you. A soulmate may step in to aid you or you may meet a new one now. Leo (July 23 to Aug. 22) As the clouds part this week, Leo, you’re ready to step further into the spotlight. You’re especially favored around all career goals now. Some of you could feel like a lucky breakthrough skyrockets you higher and further on your professional ascent. However, the key to maximizing this energy is to focus on how you can roll the dice to win big or become crowned with more power, fame, success and victory. Apply for a better job, seek a promotion, promote yourself to the public, seek an alliance with someone more powerful than you or find ways to move your career in the direction of your choosing. You won’t have this much luck in your career for over a decade, so take an important step forward now. Virgo (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) The universe is embracing you and patting you on the back now, Virgo. You are being further encouraged to pursue expansion and growth, both in personal and professional ways. The more that you seek to shake up your routine, step outside of box and soar, the more that your life will pick up positive momentum now and in the years ahead. Regardless of your current routine, it’s time to look at what lies out of reach and how you can open yourself to new possibilities and vibrant opportunities. Consider learning new skills, immersing yourself in fascinating wisdom, connect with spirituality or venture into new territory. If you can, plan a trip now or in the year ahead and you will find that your life changes in wondrous ways. Libra (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) The support you need could be offered by the universe this week, Libra. You could find that you feel like you’re on more steady ground. It appears that a breakthrough you’ve been hoping for is here, especially if you’ve been requiring aid from a partner or secondary party. This may appear in the form of wealth — perhaps a salary increase, an approved credit line, paid off debt, news of a mortgage or venture capital, an inheritance, assets or investments increase or more benefits from an employer. Don’t just sit back and wait! Try to unearth the jewels beneath the sand. Investing now could provide long-term benefits. Scorpio (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) As the heavens shine this week, Scorpio, you could find that one of the most important periods in your relationships appears before you. With so much luck on your side in relationships, you could find that happy news or a breakthrough comes to you in regards to a significant other in business or love. For instance, you could make long-term promises, move in, get engaged or find a soulmate. You can prosper and grow from teamwork, so put yourself out there! On a professional level, if you’re looking for the right associate — like an agent, trainer, assistant, or beyond — be on the lookout. Contracts and negotiations signed now could also be blessed with a winning touch. Sagittarius (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You’re truly a well-oiled machine now, Sagittarius, with many irons in the fire. The luck of the week ahead could shimmer in many areas of your life. Specifically, happy news could arise around one of the following themes: employment or job matters, coworkers, staff, pets, routines or even physical health such as improvements around fitness and diet. Take swift action to improve these areas, which will allow you to reap many benefits now and down the road. Apply for a new job if looking, pitch a new client or launch a product. On a more personal level, if you can adopt a pet or spend time with one of your own, you’ll feel particularly close and notice your souls are aligned. Last, start a new pattern in health, fitness or diet and you could feel more confident and filled with significantly more energy. Capricorn (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) You will feel like your heart has been set on fire and you are spinning in a daydream this week, Capricorn! So much happiness is ready for you, but you must first step up and be ready to claim it. Romance, fertility, creativity, hobbies, expression, sports and children could all bring such deep fulfillment to you now. When it comes to love, a milestone moment could pop up — or perhaps, you could even meet a soulmate partner if single and looking. No matter what, though, the key to maximizing this iridescent energy is to prioritize what fulfills you on the deepest of levels and seek to immerse yourself in it entirely. These are the moments that make life so beautiful, so open your heart and let the light in! Aquarius (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Prepare for your emotions to be especially peaked this week, Aquarius. But luckily, you’re likely to be in a truly joyous, peaceful and loving mood especially as the days go by. You may feel deeply grateful now, as if you are truly aligned with the universe. The week ahead is all about you appreciating the past as well as seeing positive growth around home, family, real estate or domestic matters. If you have nothing big planned, you could be inspired to have a sweet cook out or dinner party — or perhaps, get busy gardening, redecorating or relaxing at home. Choosing to build your relationships with your kindred now could provide long-term happiness and trust. Pisces (Feb. 19 to March 20) You’ll feel the spice of life this week, Pisces! You’ll be eager to have fun, laugh and live in the moment even more than usual. Exciting opportunities to pursue new adventures and ideas will surely be presented to you. You could find that you are more curious and fascinated about people and the world. If you’d like to travel or flex your communication or intellectual skills, you will feel more enlightened and invigorated in all ways. Also, a new offer is likely to present itself this week. You could be ecstatic about how your life is going in beautiful and fresh new directions. Kyle Thomas — who’s known for his cosmic guidance for celebrities, business executives and prominent influencers — is a celebrity astrologer who writes PEOPLE’s weekly horoscopes. Learn more about him here!

Categorieslatest

Suzanne Morphew Vanished on Mother's Day in 2020: Inside the Twists and Turns of Homicide Case

Four years ago today, Suzanne Morphew was believed to have gone on a Mother’s Day bike ride when she vanished. Her bike and helmet were found near the $1.75 million Mayville, Colo., home the 49-year-old shared with her husband Barry Morphew and their two daughters. She was nowhere to be found. Law enforcement and Suzanne’s brother led extensive searches for her, but found nothing. Then, in Sept. 2023, came a shocking discovery when her remains were found 50 miles away in Saguache County. Her cause of death was homicide, the medical examiner recently ruled. On the fourth anniversary of the day Morphew was reported missing, questions about what happened — and how — still abound. The biggest question is: Did her husband have anything to do with her disappearance and death? Here’s what to know about the shocking case: A Husband Accused When Suzanne vanished, Barry posted an emotional video online pleading for her safe return, along with the FBI tipline number and the promise of a $200,000 reward. Nearly a year later, on May 5, 2021, he was arrested and charged with murder after deliberation, tampering with physical evidence and attempting to influence a public servant, court records showed. Still missing, Suzanne was presumed dead. He vehemently denied the allegations. Damning Evidence? In Aug. 2021, now-retired FBI agent John Grusing testified during a preliminary hearing that investigators found a tranquilizer cap in the dryer of the Morphew’s home after Suzanne disappeared, CBS Denver reported. In July 2021, prosecutors revealed that Suzanne texted Barry on May 6, 2020, and told him she was “done” and wanted to end the marriage, 9 News reported. She had been having an affair with an old high school friend and was texting him the day before she was reported missing, court records show, KRDO reports. Barry told authorities that the night before Suzanne went missing, they were “eating steaks, having sex, and going to bed early,” according to unsealed court documents, KRDO reports. But that same night, Suzanne was texting the man police said she was having an affair with and told him at one point in a LinkedIn message, “You’re the only real love I’ve known…the only love I want,” the court documents show, KRDO reports. Alleged Deadly Chase When Barry got home on May 9, 2020, he began “moving in a pattern around the outside of the house,” cell data records allegedly showed, Grusing testified, according to reporting by 9News. Barry was “most likely chasing Suzanne around,” Grusing alleged in an affidavit, 9 News reported. Barry told authorities he was shooting chipmunks. His lawyers argued that cell phone data showed him traveling at a rate of 45 mph and could not have been on foot, 9 News reports. That Sunday, when Suzanne was reported missing, Barry was on a business trip, where investigators claimed he made five trash runs, 9News and Fox 21 reports. Charges Against Barry Dropped Barry pleaded not guilty to the charges and in April 2022, authorities dropped the charges against him, the Colorado Judicial Department told PEOPLE at the time. However, a judge granted a request by prosecutors to dismiss the charges without prejudice, allowing prosecutors to file the charges against Barry at a later date. At a press conference afterward, Barry’s attorney Iris Eytan blasted the prosecution, saying, “The prosecution was manufacturing a murder case. You’ve seen shows called ‘Making a Murderer?’ That’s what was happening here in this courtroom … They absolutely dismissed this case at this point because they knew they were going to lose this trial and Mr. Morphew was going to be acquitted and exonerated.” Adding to the mystery, prosecutors said they found three unknown DNA matches on the glove compartment of Suzanne’s vehicle, 9 News reported. One was a partial match to an unknown male who was connected to sexual assault cases in other states. Barry’s DNA was not part of that sample, his lawyers said. Barry’s Lawsuit In May 2023, Barry filed a $15 million suit in federal court against multiple entities and officials, including Chaffee County, 11th Judicial District Attorney Linda Stanley and Chaffee County Sheriff John Spezze, claiming they violated his constitutional rights, according to a complaint reviewed by PEOPLE. Autopsy Shows Homicide — by Animal Tranquilizer Cocktail In September 2023, Suzanne’s remains were found in Saguache County. In late April, the El Paso County coroner’s office released her autopsy report saying she died by homicide, the Colorado Bureau of Investigation said in a statement. The report stated she was killed “by undetermined means in the setting of butorphanol, azaperone, and medetomidine intoxication.” Want to keep up with the latest crime coverage? Sign up for PEOPLE’s free True Crime newsletter for breaking crime news, ongoing trial coverage and details of intriguing unsolved cases. The autopsy stated that the mix of drugs is “marketed as a compounded immobilizer for wildlife” — or an animal tranquilizer, KKTV reports. One of Barry’s lawyers reiterated that her client is innocent, saying the tranquilizer found in Suzanne’s body was “a very common animal tranquilizer,” 9 NEWS reported. Another Trial? Now that Suzanne’s death was ruled a homicide, prosecutors could potentially file charges against Barry again. “We will continue to follow the evidence and seek justice for Suzanne,” Anne Kelly, District Attorney for the 12th Judicial District of Colorado said in a statement, the Associated Press and ABC News report. An attorney for Barry said Barry’s tranquilizer gun was not working at the time of her disappearance, according to the AP.

Categorieslatest

The Best Sheets (2024): Linen, Percale, and Budget Bedding

We have tested dozens of options to find the best sheets in nearly every style. However, there’s an endless supply of sheets out there, so we’ll keep updating this guide as we test more. All of the prices shown are for queen-size models. Be sure to read our Best Mattresses, Best Mattresses for Side Sleepers, Best Organic Mattresses, and Best Pillows guides for more bedding recommendations. Updated May 2024: We’ve added Pottery Barn’s European Flax Linen Sheets as our new top linen pick, and added the Cultiver Linen Sheets to Other Great Linen Sheets. We’ve also added a new section of sheets we tried and didn’t love. Table of Contents Linen Sheets Percale Sheets Flannel Sheets Sateen Sheets Silk Sheets Best Organic Sheets Alternative Material Sheets Budget Sheets Others We Tried Do You Need a Top Sheet? What Does Thread Count Actually Mean? How I Test Sheets Medea Giordano contributed testing for this guide. Special offer for Gear readers: Get WIRED for just $5 ($25 off). This includes unlimited access to WIRED.com, full Gear coverage, and subscriber-only newsletters. Subscriptions help fund the work we do every day. If you buy something using links in our stories, we may earn a commission. This helps support our journalism. Learn more. Why buy linen sheets? Linen is a woven fabric made from flax plants. It is a highly breathable material, so it keeps you cool during the summer months as it doesn’t trap heat. It’s great for people who sleep hot. It’s rougher at first than a simple cotton set, but it should soften up the more it’s washed. Linen is often expensive, but it’s also more durable than cotton, so a good sheet set should last a lot longer. They’re not for everyone, but if you love linen clothing, you’ll probably love linen sheets. Our Favorite Linen Sheets My favorite game when testing new linen sheets is to ask my husband, who only likes flannel sheets, how much he hates them. I was expecting complaints about the texture, but shockingly my husband didn’t have any beyond saying the sheets felt a little stiff. Sure, they weren’t as soft as his preferred sheets, but they didn’t annoy him like other linen sheets (or other textured sheets) tend to. I agree with him–Pottery Barn’s Belgian Flax Linen Sheets have the linen feel without feeling scratchy on my skin, even in the early stages of sleeping on them (since linen softens over time). They were comfortable, and I slept fantastic with these and a comforter in the spring weather. Pottery Barn’s linen sheets were also nice and cool while I slept without having that icy touch that other cooling sheets tend to have, and almost felt like they floated just above my skin as I slept. More Affordable, Still-Great Linen Quince’s linen sheets were initially softer and less itchy than the ones from Brooklinen, and they’re almost $130 cheaper. However, they run just slightly warmer. If you don’t feel like you’re a particularly hot sleeper but you want linen, then these are a safe bet. (Or just try them without worry—you can return them for free within a year.) You should line dry linen, but if you do use a dryer like we did, expect to clean up a lot of lint. That was the case for other linen sheets we tried too, but with these sheets, the lint trap started to overflow as there was so much. Quince also has a bamboo linen sheet set, which we also really like. It’s a little cheaper at $100, and feels lighter and silkier while still maintaining some of the weight and stiffness of linen sheets. I found it a little more cooling than heavier linen too. Other Great Linen Sheets Casaluna Washed Linen Solid Sheet Set for $159: These sheets aren’t soft, but have a weight to them that makes them feel luxurious. They’re warm though—I felt warmer sleeping on these than the ones above and sateen sheets. They’re a great price for linen and a good choice for anyone who wants to be a little cozier when they sleep. Brooklinen Washed Linen Core Sheet Set for $260: When WIRED reviewer Medea Giordano first got into bed, these Brooklinen sheets were itchy, but after a few minutes, she relaxed and that feeling went away. The result was some of the soundest, coolest sleep she’s had. Neither she nor her husband woke up sweaty, even during the Texas summer with two cats snuggled into them. Brooklinen makes a few of our favorite sheets, and all the types are available in pleasant colors and patterns. Cultiver Linen Sheets for $410: These sheets are the softest linen I’ve ever tried, so soft that my husband didn’t even realize I had swapped out a flannel set for these. They’re super comfortable to sleep on but still have that light linen feel. The Cultiver sheets feel a little silkier (a word I never thought I’d use to describe linen) and drape a little more nicely around my body and on the bed. These sheets are a splurge, but if you want extra soft linen, these are the way to go. The only thing I didn’t like about them was the overflowing lint tray after drying them. Why buy percale sheets? Percale is a type of cotton weave, not a type of fabric. It’s also referred to as a plain weave. It looks how you might picture a classic weave to look, with an over-under style like a checkerboard. These sheets tend to be crisp, cool, and lightweight. Think of hotel sheets or your favorite button-up shirt. They’re a good middle ground if you sleep hot but don’t want to spring for linen and its higher prices. Our Favorite Percale Sheets Target’s in-house brands make great, affordable sheets, including this Casaluna percale set. WIRED reviewer Medea Giordano has been sleeping on them for several years, and they’re her favorite of all the types of percale sheets she’s tried, even those twice the price. They’re crisp without being uncomfortably stiff, and she stays cool all night in them. These Casaluna sheets have held up through many, many machine washing cycles, and are only getting more lived-in and soft. There are several colors to choose from too. When Medea upgraded from a queen to a king bed, these were the sheets she repurchased immediately. Other Great Percale Sheets Riley Percale Sheet Set for $260: Riley makes nice percale sheets, but they’re pricey—a fitted sheet and pillowcases cost $135 and the flat sheet costs an additional $85. We liked their crispness but were more impressed by the Casaluna ones. Parachute Percale Sheet Set for $269: WIRED reviews editor Julian Chokkattu says these sheets feel rough at first but soften up the more they’re washed. They’ve held up extremely well after years of use, even with a dog sleeping in the same bed. Why buy flannel sheets? Flannel sheets are made of cotton, but the cotton fibers are brushed out to create a fuzzy texture. Those fluffed-out fibers also are what make flannel so warm and cozy to sleep on—the teased layers of cotton do a better job of retaining heat than other styles of cotton sheets, so you’ll stay much warmer sleeping on these than other sheet styles. They’re great for cooler climates. Our Favorite Flannel Sheets The Company Store’s flannel sheets initially threw me off with how pink the cream color looked, especially when placed next to other white sheets. But once I saw past that, these sheets felt the softest to the touch compared to the Coyuchi and L.L. Bean flannels I tried (see below). They’re a little stiff initially, but soften up with each wash. They’re cozy to sleep on and definitely warm—these were the warmest I slept on out of the bunch. If you’re looking for soft and warm at a reasonable price, these sheets deliver. Other Great Flannel (Or Similar) Sheets L.L. Bean’s UltraSoft Flannel Sheets for $139: These are definitely soft, but not as soft as our top flannel pick, and they feel lighter too. They’re almost like a warm jersey rather than a flannel. If you’re looking for a light but still soft set of sheets, these are a good choice. Coyuchi Cloud Brushed Organic Flannel Sheet Set for $268: These sheets are super soft and fantastic to sleep on. They’re warm and cozy, yet a little lighter than the Company Store’s set. But they’re a splurge. If your budget can stretch, these are my favorite flannel sheets. Brooklinen’s Heathered Cashmere Sheets for $350: These sheets are a major splurge. They’re 95 percent cotton and 5 percent cashmere wool, giving them a little rougher texture than your usual flannel sheets. I still really liked sleeping on them and found them warm and cozy, but my husband, who favors soft sheets, didn’t care for them. Why buy sateen sheets? Sateen is a cotton weave similar to percale, but it uses a three-over-one thread style weave compared to one-over-one. Those extra threads give it a silkier feel even though it’s still cotton, and it tends to be both cooler and a little heavier. They’re great for summer months if you want something cool to the touch, but they also work for colder months if you aren’t looking for something too heat-trapping like flannel but still want to retain some heat. Our Favorite Sateen Sheets I have a few sets of JCPenney’s Wrinkle Guard sateen sheets in my linen closet thanks to my wedding registry. They’re soft and cool to the touch, with the silky finish sateen is known for without being slippery. They drape well on my bed and don’t keep me too warm, but be careful how you fold them as they aren’t completely wrinkle-free. The craziest thing to me about these sheets is that I can barely tell the difference between them and the Brooklinen Luxe Core Set, which is double the price (also courtesy of my wedding registry). They’re similar and both incredibly comfortable to sleep on, but JCPenney’s sheets are just hard to beat on value. Other Great Sateen Sheets Quince Luxury Organic Signature Sateen Sheet Set for $99: We prefer Quince’s linen sheets, but if you want cotton, these are a good choice. Former WIRED reviewer Haley Sprankle raved about these sheets being the perfect combination of light weight and sumptuous. WIRED reviewer Medea Giordano liked these too, though she prefers other materials over sateen. Some people might find sateen hot, but we did not find that to be the case with these. Brooklinen Luxe Sateen Core Sheet Set for $189: These sheets are similar to JCPenney’s set but more expensive. They’re a touch silkier thanks to a higher thread count—Brooklinen has 480 versus JCPenney’s 400. We explain thread counts further below. Why buy silk sheets? Silk stays cool and slick when you need it, so you shouldn’t heat up and stick to your bed in the middle of the night. But it also is capable of insulating you decently well to keep you warm in the winter months. Silk is also better for your beauty rest and the reason why silk scarves, bonnets, and pillowcases are so popular. It absorbs less moisture from your hair and skin, so you stay hydrated and don’t lose all your expensive beauty products to your pillow. It also causes less friction, pulling less at your skin during the night. If you’re a side or stomach sleeper where your face makes direct contact with your pillow, silk is a great option to consider. If you Google silk sheets, you’ll see results for things like “eucalyptus silk” or “silky tencel.” These might still be comfortable and soft, but they are not real silk. Real silk sheets are categorized by their density and weight, called momme. A higher number equals more threads, a higher density, and more durability. For example, 25-momme sheets are a higher quality and more durable, but also more expensive. The 19-momme sheets we recommend here are a perfectly good set. It’s worth noting that some people find sleeping on a full silk bed to be annoying, with their pillows slipping around and the corners coming untucked, but we didn’t encounter this. Our Favorite Silk Sheets Sleeping on these silk sheets feels like true luxury. It’s soft and smooth without being freezing cold. Lilysilk is the only brand of silk sheets we’ve tested, and it’s very expensive to get a full set—you’re looking at nearly $600 for one flat sheet, one fitted sheet, and two pillowcases—but the brand offers each piece individually. WIRED reviewer Medea Giordano tried the fitted sheet with a regular percale top sheet and found it cooling and comfortable. If you can spend a little more, Lilysilk has 22- and 25-momme sets available. They’re a little more durable, but 19 is still very high quality. Our Favorite Silk Pillowcase Switching to a silk pillowcase might make a difference for a lot less money than replacing the whole set. Silk sheets boast benefits for hair and skin, and a pillowcase targets those benefits to your face and hair. While using a silk pillowcase didn’t fix all my hair problems, my hair was certainly softer while I slept on one of these. Of the silk pillowcases I’ve tested, these are my favorites. Quince makes my favorite silk pillowcase. It’s a great value at $40, and it has a better weight for that price than other brands. Quince’s silk pillowcase is 22-momme, where others usually have a 19-momme for that price, and that heavier weight makes it slightly thicker and softer to the touch. It has a zipper enclosure which I liked, since it kept the pillowcase looking polished, and I didn’t have to worry about my pillow wiggling its way out of the case while I tossed and turned in the night. Sleep Number’s Silk Pillowcase ($50) felt very similar to it and also has a zipper enclosure, but it costs $10 more and is a slightly lighter weight (21-momme). Other Great Silk (or Similar) Pillowcases LilySilk 19-Momme Silk Pillowcase for $45: This is the same price as the Quince pillowcase, but a lighter weight, though it’s barely noticeable side by side. If you prefer no zipper, though, this is the silk pillowcase for you. It does have a few colors and prints that Quince doesn’t, so you might want to peruse the two brands and choose based on your color preference. Silken Pure Silk Envelope Pillowcase for $98: This pillowcase is a splurge, but the Silken Pure is noticeably higher-end. Medea found it’s not as slippery as other, cheaper pillowcases, but is super cooling on your skin. She says it’s held up great in the wash too. She does find she has to adjust it in the morning, since it doesn’t have a zipper enclosure. Kitsch Satin Pillowcase for $19: This pillowcase is satin, not silk, but Medea says it’s better than similarly priced silk options. If you’re not looking to spend more than $20 to $25, she says to choose this one over the cheap silk pillowcases you’ll find on Amazon. Why buy organic sheets? If you’re buying an organic mattress, you probably want to pair it with organic sheets. Otherwise, nonorganic sheets can bring the chemicals and materials you avoided—including anything from formaldehyde and TCEP (a flame retardant) to phthalates—right back into your life. Even if you have a regular mattress, you can still benefit from choosing sheets that are made of natural, organic materials. Our Favorite Organic Sheets WIRED reviewer Scott Gilbertson tests organic bedding, and these are the best organic cotton sheets he’s tried. They’re soft but not overly silky, which is a feeling he doesn’t care for (if you do, check out the Avocado sheets below). The Brooklinen organic cotton sheets are made from Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS)-certified organic cotton. They’re also Oeko-Tex certified, which means they’re tested for and do not contain any known toxic chemicals. The 300 thread count makes this plenty crisp and soft but not so tight that you end up sleeping hot. These are a great choice for summer or if, like Scott, you sleep on the warm side even in winter. Other Great Organic Sheets Avocado Organic Cotton Sheets for $180: These 600-count sheets are like sleeping on silk or satin and are 100 percent GOTS-certified organic cotton from India. The only potential issue here is that, because they are such a dense weave, they sleep a little warmer than what you might be used to. There’s also a 400-count version we haven’t tested. Avocado Organic Linen Sheets for $499: These linen sheets are some of the heaviest Scott has tried and will likely last you many years, thanks to the heavy weight. They’ll get softer with every wash, but they are initially rougher than other styles of sheets. Why buy bamboo or eucalyptus sheets? Companies are making sheets from other materials now too, like bamboo and eucalyptus. The latter usually takes less water than cotton and less harsh chemicals than bamboo to produce sheets. Because bamboo plants grow so quickly, it’s thought to be an eco-friendly resource we can use without depleting the planet. However, it’s not a perfect solution. The process of turning bamboo into fabric uses harsh chemicals, which can actually add to air and water pollution. Bamboo viscose is slightly better than bamboo rayon. A Eucalyptus Sheet We were already fans of Buffy’s enormous Wiggle Pllow, and now we’re happy to have tried the company’s sheets too. They’re light and airy and yet feel warm, like you’re cozy under your favorite blanket, without making you hot and sweaty. WIRED reviewer Medea Giordano says her husband struggles with waking up sweaty on materials like percale, even when they feel cool to the touch, but he commented on how nice he felt sleeping in these. She did, however, note that they slid up the side of her mattress more than some other sheets. The fabric uses a sateen weave but is actually Tencel lyocell, which is made from sustainable wood sources—in this case, eucalyptus—and it’s biodegradable. A Bamboo Sheet While WIRED reviewer Medea Giordano says she prefers the crispness of percale, these Luxome sheets made from bamboo viscose are the softest bedding she’s ever slept in. They’re silky and drape well, but have deep pockets and elastic straps to keep them on your mattress all night. They’ve held up in the wash too. We were nervous they’d get pilly like some similar cheap soft sheets we’ve tried from Bed Bath and Beyond (RIP) but that hasn’t been the case. Other Great Bamboo Sheets Bedsure Bamboo Cooling Sheet Set for $60: This is one of the best cheap sets of sheets we found from stores like Amazon and Walmart, and happened to be bamboo to boot. They’re made from bamboo rayon (instead of viscose, which is better for the environment), and while they aren’t as silky and cool as the Luxome sheets above, they’re a close second. Quince Bamboo Linen Sheet Set for $100: Quince’s bamboo linen sheets are well priced for linen. They have a slightly softer, silkier feel compared to regular linen but still maintain some of the weight and stiffness you’d expect with linen sheets. It’s made with 70 percent bamboo rayon (less ideal than bamboo viscose) and 30 percent linen. These are a little more cooling to sleep on compared to other linen sheets too. Cozy Earth Bamboo Sheet Set for $389: Similar to Luxome, these bamboo sheets are 100 percent bamboo viscose, but they’re pricier. Still, they’re insanely soft and nice and cold to the touch. They warm up after about 15 minutes of lying in bed but still feel almost as if they’ve melted around you. A Bamboo Linen Sheet Quince’s bamboo linen sheets are well priced for linen. They have a slightly softer, silkier feel compared to regular linen but still maintain some of the weight and stiffness you’d expect with linen sheets. It’s made with 70 percent bamboo rayon (less ideal than bamboo viscose) and 30 percent linen. These are a little more cooling to sleep on compared to other linen sheets too. On a tight budget? Some of our favorite sheets are surprisingly cheap compared to other similar sets, but they cover a range of sheet styles. Our Favorite Budget Sheets After a cross-state move that required me to ditch anything that didn’t fit into my car, sheets somehow didn’t make the cut. So I popped into Target to grab its cheapest queen sheet set off the shelf and promptly left the store, because my moving budget had dried up. Target’s Room Essentials set is made with a plain cotton weave, and I didn’t expect them to hold up for long, especially with my claw-happy cat in the house. It’s been four years and I still use these sheets. They’re soft and light after years of use and feel a bit like a favorite T-shirt I’ve worn in the perfect amount. My husband, much to my ire, calls these “the nice sheets” even though we have actual nice sheets. They’re affordable and are comfortable to sleep on. Other Great Budget Sheets Bedsure Bamboo Cooling Sheet Set for $60: We tried a few sets of cheap, highly-rated sheets from stores like Amazon and Walmart in hopes of finding a great pair well under the $100 mark. This $60 set from Bedsure was the best one. They’re made from bamboo rayon, and while they aren’t as silky and cool as the Luxome sheets above, they’re a close second. Luxome’s sheets are made from bamboo viscose, which is better for the environment. JCPenney’s Wrinkle Guard sateen sheets for $90: You might think 90 bucks isn’t cheap. You’re not wrong. But compared to other, similar sateen sheets, this price is fantastic and well worth the small splurge compared to trendier brands. Not every set of sheets was one we loved. Here are some other sheets we tried and would avoid. Amazon Basics Microfiber Sheet Set ($17): Oh how we wanted $20 sheets to be the unexpected hero of our testing, but alas, this set is a failure. They feel (and sound!) kind of like those paper robes you have to wear at the doctor’s office. We hardly lasted a night sleeping on these. Article Brushed Cotton Sheets for $129: I expected these to feel like lighter flannel, but instead, they feel more like a crisp percale. They’re solid for sleeping on, though a bit rough at first (especially if you’re expecting a softer, flannel-like texture). FluffCo Flat & Fitted Sheets for $130: These sheets are designed to feel like hotel sheets, and they have a stiff, firm texture that reminds me of a hotel. It’s a sateen set, even though the texture feels more like a percale. I also didn’t like that while they aren’t cheap, they don’t come with pillowcases. To sleep with a top sheet or not to sleep with a top sheet has been a matter of debate in the past few years, with some opting to speak for a generation. WIRED is divided on this issue, though most of the Gear team seems to go without. I start out the night with a top sheet but usually find it bunched up in the morning. WIRED reviewer Medea Giordano is passionate about always sleeping with one (“This millennial has not killed the top sheet industry,” she says). Do whatever keeps you comfortable. Many companies now offer the option to forgo a top sheet altogether while purchasing a set. If you think you don’t like a top sheet because you get too hot, you might just need to find a cooler material. Thread count is the number of threads you’ll find in one square inch of a sheet’s fabric. The thread count can range pretty widely on sheets, and some brands like Parachute claim it doesn’t matter. You also might see some styles of sheets won’t call out thread counts at all—silk uses a different system, called momme, which focuses on the weight of the silk, and flannel sheets usually list the ounces of weight of the flannel. Ultimately, higher thread counts mean literally more thread—it’s a denser weave and weight that can also feel heavy if you’re used to lighter weaves and lower thread counts. Some equate thread count with quality or softness, but you shouldn’t treat it as the ultimate rule of how good a set of sheets will be. You can use thread count to understand two things: texture (higher thread counts usually mean a smoother feel) and warmth (more threads will retain more heat). If you want lighter sheets, lower thread counts could actually be better for you, but higher thread counts can mean a smoother feel or warmer layers if you’re a cold sleeper. Even if you like a toasty bed, you never need as high as 800 and 1,000 thread counts, so don’t splurge for super high numbers. This one’s easy: by sleeping! I sleep on each set of sheets for about a week to see how they hold up and how comfortable they are. I check how well secured they stay on the mattress throughout that week, how well they retain heat (taking the material into consideration; flannel should be keeping me much warmer than sateen, for example) and how soft or unsoft they feel after prolonged exposure. I also wash them as soon as they arrived in a normal, cold cycle and check ehether the texture has changed at all after a wash, and do the same thing after a week of use. I also keep sheets on hand to compare textures side by side with similar styles of sheets.

Categorieslatest

Need an ACP Alternative? Check Out Savings With the Lifeline Program

Throughout the pandemic, we learned how important it is to be connected at home. Whether working from home, tending to our health via telemedicine or simply trying to stay sane by binge-watching shows on our favorite streaming services — having a reliable broadband connection is fundamental to our daily routines. Now, we’re all riding the waves of some uncertain economic times. During such moments, finding ways to save money can be empowering. That’s where the federal government’s Lifeline program may help, especially with the end of the Affordable Connectivity Program near. Lifeline began in 1985 to help low-income families afford phone service. It provides a monthly benefit of $9.25 to help offset those costs. Eligible individuals and families on tribal lands may receive up to $34.25. While Lifeline still covers traditional landline and wireless plans, the program was broadened in 2016 to include home broadband service. A home internet discount can help you stay tethered to job prospects, schooling opportunities, family services and emergency care. The Lifeline program is available to consumers across the country, but eligibility is limited to low-income families and individuals. CNET can walk you through what you need to know to determine if you qualify. If you do, you may find that the Lifeline discount also opens the door to additional savings — more on that to come. Are you eligible? While Lifeline is available across the US, not everyone can benefit. Its goal is to assist low-income households and individuals to stay connected to school, work, play, utilities, health care and other social services. To participate in Lifeline, at least one household member must fit the program requirements. If anyone in your home currently participates in government assistance plans — including Federal Public Housing Assistance, Medicaid, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Supplemental Security Income, tribal-specific programs (Bureau of Indian Affairs General Assistance, Tribal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations and Head Start) and Veterans Pension and Survivors Benefit Programs — you should be eligible to receive the Lifeline discount. Even if you do not participate in any of the above programs, you might also be eligible for Lifeline based on your income. Your household will qualify if your income is less than or equal to 135% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines. Here’s what that looks like: Lifeline qualification: Total income Once you get over eight people, add $5,380 to the last amount listed for each additional individual. Also, the numbers are slightly higher for folks living in Alaska and Hawaii, as you can see above. In Alaska, you should add $6,730 to the final amount listed for each individual beyond eight. Consumers living in Hawaii should add $6,190 for each individual beyond eight. Have you gathered your documents and paperwork? Whether you sign up online or complete your application process by mail, you’ll need to gather several documents to help verify your eligibility. In almost all cases, you’ll need statements dated within the past 12 months. Acceptable documentation includes (but isn’t limited to): Proof of income (some options are a current pay stub, a Social Security statement of benefits or a tax return). Note: If the paperwork does not cover a full income year, it must reflect three consecutive months.Proof of program participation (including a notice letter of participation or statement of benefits). Keep these documents and make copies to send. The complete list of acceptable documents is available online via the Lifeline Support Center. Now it’s time to apply for Lifeline For the most part, to apply for Lifeline broadband benefits, you can apply online through the Lifeline National Verifier, an application system set up by the Federal Communications Commission and run by the Universal Service Administrative Company. You can go to the site, enter your name, address and identifying information and begin the process of qualifying for benefits. The two exceptions are Oregon and Texas. Applicants from those two regions must go through their states’ specific application process. If you prefer, you can also choose to apply by mail. You will need to print out an application (a PDF is available on the USAC site), complete it and send copies (make sure you keep all your original paperwork — send duplicates only) of all required documents to USAC, Lifeline Support Center, PO Box 7081, London, KY 40742. You can also request that an application be mailed to you. To do so, either email LifelineSupport@usac.org or call Lifeline at 800-234-9473. Once you start your application for Lifeline, you have 45 days to complete the process. Additionally, once you qualify for Lifeline, you’ll have 90 days to either sign up for service with an internet company or apply your Lifeline benefit to your current broadband provider. Bonus round: Lifeline can unlock additional savings on internet service You’ve just been accepted for Lifeline and now get the $9.25 benefit on your internet service, which is great. Even better, many internet providers offer low-cost plans to eligible customers, but you’ll have to enter your details to see if you qualify. Here are just a few of the ISPs that offer discounted internet service: AT&TBreezelineCox CommunicationsFrontier CommunicationsIdeaTekJackson Energy AuthorityMediacomSpectrumT-MobileVerizonXfinity This is not an exhaustive list of all providers that offer cheap residential broadband. Check out CNET’s best internet deals for seniors and students, and our compiled list of monthly discounts and promos. Some final details to keep in mind There is only one Lifeline benefit permitted per household. If you choose to use the discount on your home internet, you cannot get an additional discount on phone service. You must choose one or the other. Also, eligible people must recertify their eligibility yearly to continue receiving the Lifeline discount. Failure to do so will result in the subscriber getting disqualified for further assistance until eligibility has been reestablished. If you have questions regarding the Lifeline program, you can email LifelineSupport@usac.org or call the Lifeline Support Center at 800-234-9473.

Categorieslatest

World Backup Day 2024: Best Cloud Storage Software Options

While it sounds entirely made up, World Backup Day is real and it happened on March 31. That said, we couldn’t think of a more perfect time to take steps to protect your precious files. Backing your data up on an external storage drive is a great place to start, but you’ll want to keep your most important stuff somewhere that can never be lost, damaged or stolen. That means you’ll want to use the best cloud storage service available; one that allows you to access your files whenever, wherever, while also saving space on your phone, tablet or computer. There are plenty of free cloud storage services available, whether your needs are professional or personal. Many offer upgraded paid plans, which means it’s easy to find a plan that can meet your needs to keep your data stored safely. For this article’s purposes, we’ll be focusing on plans for the average person. We’ve compiled a guide to the most popular cloud storage services: how they work, their strengths and weaknesses. We’ve even included some lesser-known services if you want to get away from the mainstream. To be clear, we have not tested these services — this is an overview and some analysis of some of the top options in the market. What is cloud storage? Cloud storage is a type of computer data storage that allows your files to be immediately available on almost any internet-connected device anywhere. Files are stored on servers in a data center, instead of directly on your device. Best cloud storage service options Other Cloud Storage Options Google Drive, OneDrive, Dropbox, Box and Amazon aren’t your only cloud storage options. SugarSync is a Dropbox-like alternative with apps for every mobile platform. The service offers personal and business plans with a 30-day free trial to start. With a personal SugarSync account, you get 100GB for $7.49 a month, $250GB for $10 a month or 500GB for $18.95 a month. The service offers secure file-sharing (even if they don’t have an account), collaboration, file syncing, as well as remote data wipes in the event of loss, theft or damage. Another option for cloud storage is pCloud. The service offers annual and lifetime plans for individuals, families and businesses. PCloud doesn’t limit file sizes and doesn’t throttle your upload or download speeds. While your pCloud files are securely stored on the company’s servers, you can add an extra layer of protection by purchasing pCloud Crypto. PCloud Crypto provides client-side encryption where the encrypted version of your files are stored on pCloud servers, but the plain-text files stay on your computer. With your Crypto Pass code, you can encrypt or decrypt your files. You can subscribe to Premium 500GB ($50 a year) or Premium Plus 2TB ($100 a year). Both of these plans, as well as the Custom 10TB Plan also offer a lifetime subscription for a flat fee. Customers can start with annual plans and upgrade to lifetime plans later if they choose. Cloud storage: Terms to know Cloud: This refers to software and services that are stored on the internet, instead of locally on your computer or phone. The cloud allows you to access your files anywhere with an internet connection. Data center: Even though your files are stored in the cloud, there is still physical hardware involved. The company that you’ve purchased cloud storage from — like Google or Apple — will have actual servers where customer information lives. Terabyte: A terabyte is a unit of measurement for digital data. One terabyte equals about 1,000 GB. Frequently asked questions How do I clear my cloud storage? The process for clearing your cloud storage may vary depending on which service you use. In the Google One app, for example, there’s a Free Up Account Storage button. Why use cloud storage? Instead of having to remember a thumb drive, or emailing items to yourself, cloud storage lets you access your files, documents and photos on demand. If your computer or phone crashes, you don’t have to worry about losing your content, because those files are stored on a separate server. Cloud storage can be a convenient option because options like Google One, iCloud and OneDrive are built into services many use on a daily basis. Cloud storage also lets you keep your device’s local storage freed up. Is cloud storage safe? According to Norton, cloud storage is a safe option for users because the on-site servers are usually located in warehouses that few employees have access to. In addition, the files stored on the servers are encrypted, adding another layer of security. No type of digital storage is risk-free, but cloud storage services also offer more immediate security features like two-factor authentication and security checkups. Privacy and security features may vary between services. How much cloud storage do I need? How much storage you’ll need will depend on what you’re storing. A student will likely need a smaller storage plan than a professional photographer. If your needs change, most plans let you easily upgrade or downgrade. For more information, check out how to clear up space in your Google Drive and the best iPhones of 2024. Sarah Mitroff contributed to this article.

Categorieslatest

More than half of US residents now affected by 100% clean energy legislation

Lawmakers in Vermont voted overwhelmingly this week to approve a bill requiring all state utilities to reach 100% renewable energy by 2035 — and becoming the 24th U.S. state to have set targets to adopt 100% carbon-free power. The bill cleared both chambers Tuesday with strong veto-proof majorities, all but guaranteeing it will survive any override attempt by Republican Gov. Phil Scott. Scott and his administration have previously criticized the bill, primarily over its high price tag and short compliance time frame, which they fear will not give utilities the time needed to transition to 100% renewable resources. Asked this week whether Scott would override the bill, Jason Maulucci, Scott’s spokesman, said the governor has not yet made a final decision. The new bill, H.289, requires Vermont utilities to double the amount of new renewable energy resources built in-state. It also sets a faster compliance time compared to many other states, second only to Rhode Island, which has has a goal of carbon-free power by 2033. Its passage comes as other states and territories also moved to adopt some sort of target for 100% clean energy. In fact, more than 53% of U.S. residents now in a state or territory that is moving toward the 100% clean energy goal, according to data compiled by the Clean Energy States Alliance. States with clean energy targets Vermont’s legislation, once signed into law, will place it among the states aiming to meet the 100% clean energy goal the fastest, joining Michigan, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, Oregon, and Minnesota, which have all set target dates at or before 2040. And other states aren’t too far behind: California, Hawaii, New Mexico, and Virginia have all set 100% clean energy goals by 2050. To date, 25 state governors have also signed onto the U.S. Climate Alliance — committing to comply with the Paris climate agreement targets regardless of federal policy. But not all the laws require the exact same standards — and they vary widely in the level of compliance they’ve made to date. Varying standards The laws vary in scope — with some states targeting 100% carbon-free power, a distinction that allows for nuclear power, while others require the power mix comprise strictly renewable resources, such as wind and solar energy. Two New England states, Connecticut and Rhode Island, will require Renewable Energy Credits, or RECs, to offset natural gas generation, since they share a regional power grid operator, New England ISO, that will not be shutting down all gas-fired power plants in the region by their separate renewable energy deadlines. In both Connecticut and Rhode Island, electric providers will be required to purchase RECs from renewable resources to offset power generation from the gas-fired plants. The states have also made varying degrees of progress toward their goals. Oregon lawmakers passed legislation in 2021 setting a target of slashing 80% of greenhouse gas emissions from their electricity sector by 2035, which increases to 100% in 2040. To date, they’ve slashed emissions by 25% compared to 2010 levels, as outlined last year by state utility provider Portland General Electric. But they have a ways to go: according to a report published last May, the state’s wind and solar resources still need to increase four-fold compared to current levels in order to meet the 2040 target. New York set a goal of reaching 70% renewable energy generation by 2030, and 100% by 2040. State legislation has focused on increasing the state’s use of wind and solar energy and existing nuclear and hydroelectric power generation as a way to meet that goal. Last fall, New York Gov. Kathy Hochul (D-NY) said the state was on track to meet those goals, which she said was due in large part to the state’s investment in carbon-free power. The full list of states can be found on the Clean Energy States Alliance website here. Room for improvement Vermont is one of just two states that have set a clean energy target on track with the Biden administration’s stated goal of reaching 100% carbon-free power by 2035 — illustrating the difficulties of switching to carbon-free and renewable energy resources. Even so, environmental groups say they remain hopeful about progress. The Sierra Club’s “Ready for 100” campaign has a list of states and cities that have adopted 100% clean energy targets, which currently includes more than 100 cities nationwide. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER Six cities — Aspen, Burlington, Georgetown, Greensburg, Kodiak Island, and Rock Port — have already hit those targets. Vanessa Rule, the co-director of the climate group 350VT, praised the vote by Vermont lawmakers this week, saying in a statement circulated by the Sierra Club: “Now we need to get to work meeting the new goals with a strong community solar program, well-sited projects that protect farmland and ecosystems, and ensure this electricity is affordable and available for everyone.”

Categorieslatest

Giant ‘rogue waves’ of invisible matter might be disrupting the orbits of stars, new study hints

Skip to main content Open menu Close menu Live Science Live Science Search Search Live Science Subscribe RSS How It Works Magazine Why subscribe? The ultimate action-packed science and technology magazine bursting with exciting information about the universe Subscribe today and save an extra 5% with checkout code ‘LOVE5’ Engaging articles, amazing illustrations & exclusive interviews Issues delivered straight to your door or device From$26.49View Space Health Planet Earth Animals Archaeology Physics & Math Human Behavior Technology Chemistry More Science news About Us Newsletter Story archive Trending Tonga eruption cause Chimpanzee wars New EV batteries Weird technologies Best telescopes When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Here’s how it works. Physics & Mathematics Dark Matter Giant ‘rogue waves’ of invisible matter might be disrupting the orbits of stars, new study hints News By Paul Sutter published 12 May 2024 New research shows how disruptions to binary star systems could be the key to detecting space’s most confounding substance — dark matter. A Hubble Space Telescope image of the Twin Jet Nebula, a planetary nebula created by a pair of binary stars. The influence of dark matter may alter the behavior of stars like these in detectable ways, new research suggests. (Image credit: NASA / Hubble) Gigantic clumps of invisible dark matter that roam the universe may be wreaking havoc on binary stars, slowly tearing them apart, a new study suggests. Those violent effects could help reveal the true nature of the universe’s most elusive entity. Over the decades, astronomers have amassed an enormous amount of evidence pointing to the existence of dark matter, an invisible form of matter that accounts for around 85% of the mass in almost every galaxy. Initially, astronomers thought dark matter might be a new kind of particle known as weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), which would interact only with each other through gravity and the weak nuclear force. But experiments designed to find the trace signals of WIMPs as they float through Earth haven’t found anything, and the WIMP model has some difficulties matching the densities of matter within galactic cores. Because of this, scientists have been increasingly looking toward an alternative model in which the dark matter particle is extremely light — even lighter than the lightest known particle, the neutrino. In these models, the dark matter particle would be more than a billion billion times lighter than an electron. And we know from quantum mechanics that all particles have a wave-like nature associated with them, which we can usually detect only in subatomic experiments. But in this scenario, the dark matter would be so light that it would act more like a wave at scales the size of the solar system or bigger. Recently, a team of astronomers in China examined this model and looked for ways to observationally detect this kind of dark matter. They reported their work in an article published to the preprint server arXiv in April. (The study has not been peer-reviewed yet.) Ultralight dark matter wouldn’t buzz around the cosmos like tiny bullets. Instead, it would slosh around every galaxy like a vast, invisible ocean. And just like oceans can support waves, the bath of ultralight dark matter would have oscillations of its own. Some of these waves could potentially bundle together into a single group that travels interdependently while maintaining their shape — known as a soliton. Dark matter (represented in blue in this composite satellite image) dominates up to 85% of the mass of most galaxies. (Image credit: NASA, ESA, CFHT, CXO, M.J. Jee (University of California, Davis), and A. Mahdavi (San Francisco State University)) These solitons would be completely invisible — like giant, rogue waves washing through the galaxy but made of matter so light that they would barely affect their surroundings. But the scientists behind the new study discovered that the solitons’ huge size could subtly alter the gravitational environment around them. Sign up for the Live Science daily newsletter now Get the world’s most fascinating discoveries delivered straight to your inbox. Contact me with news and offers from other Future brandsReceive email from us on behalf of our trusted partners or sponsorsBy submitting your information you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy and are aged 16 or over. related stories —Millions of invisible ‘mirror stars’ could exist in the Milky Way, and astronomers know how to find them —1st images from the Euclid ‘dark universe’ telescope are here — and they’re jaw-dropping —Large Hadron Collider could be generating dark matter in its particle jets The gravitational influence of the solitons would be so weak that almost everything in the galaxy would be unaffected by them. But binary pairs of stars that have wide separations are only weakly held together by their mutual gravity, so the solitons would be big enough to alter their orbits. The researchers identified all wide binary pairs in the Gaia catalog of the billion stars closest to the sun and flagged them for future observations. If the binary stars were to start drifting away from each other, that might be due to the influence of solitons. The team found that by watching the binary stars evolve, we could have a very sensitive probe of ultralight dark matter — perhaps even more sensitive than any Earth-based laboratory designed to detect this kind of dark matter. So, if something strange seems to be happening to binary stars, we might just have our first clue as to the nature of dark matter. Paul Sutter Social Links Navigation Astrophysicist Paul M. Sutter is a research professor in astrophysics at SUNY Stony Brook University and the Flatiron Institute in New York City. He regularly appears on TV and podcasts, including “Ask a Spaceman.” He is the author of two books, “Your Place in the Universe” and “How to Die in Space,” and is a regular contributor to Space.com, Live Science, and more. Paul received his PhD in Physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2011, and spent three years at the Paris Institute of Astrophysics, followed by a research fellowship in Trieste, Italy. More about dark matter Dark matter could be building up inside dead stars — with potentially explosive consequences Millions of invisible ‘mirror stars’ could exist in the Milky Way, and astronomers know how to find them Latest Massive study of 8,000 cats reveals which breeds live longest See more latest ► Most Popular Can mirrors facing each other create infinite reflections? Suspected thieves nearly swipe pre-Hispanic artifacts from an archaeological site in Peru Odd earthquake swarm in Central Europe hints at magma bubbling below the surface Cosmic ‘superbubbles’ might be throwing entire galaxies into chaos, theoretical study hints Roman-era skeletons buried in embrace, on top of a horse, weren’t lovers, DNA analysis shows ‘Severe’ geomagnetic storm will bring widespread auroras this weekend after gigantic sunspot spits out 5 solar storms Lab-made universal blood could revolutionize transfusions. Scientists just got one step closer to making it. One of the best Apple Airpod alternative running headphones is now 20% off Feral cats ate critically endangered baby crocodiles in Cuba, study suggests Master regulator of inflammation found — and it’s in the brain stem Elephants say ‘hello’ to friends by flapping their ears and making little rumbly noises MOST READ MOST SHARED 1 Can mirrors facing each other create infinite reflections? 2 ‘The most critically harmful fungi to humans’: How the rise of C. auris was inevitable 3 2,500-year-old Illyrian helmet found in burial mound likely caused ‘awe in the enemy’ 4 Japan captures 1st image of space debris from orbit, and it’s spookily stunning 5 32 of the most colorful birds on Earth 1 ‘The most critically harmful fungi to humans’: How the rise of C. auris was inevitable 2 32 of the most colorful birds on Earth 3 Can mirrors facing each other create infinite reflections? 4 Roman-era skeletons buried in embrace, on top of a horse, weren’t lovers, DNA analysis shows 5 Papua New Guineans, genetically isolated for 50,000 years, carry Denisovan genes that help their immune system, study suggests Live Science is part of Future US Inc, an international media group and leading digital publisher. Visit our corporate site. About Us Contact Future’s experts Terms and conditions Privacy policy Cookies policy Accessibility Statement Advertise with us Web notifications Careers Editorial standards How to pitch a story to us © Future US, Inc. Full 7th Floor, 130 West 42nd Street, New York, NY 10036.

Categorieslatest

My Boyfriend Is Constantly Defending a Despicable Man. I Can’t Take It Anymore.

Care and Feeding is Slate’s parenting advice column. Have a question for Care and Feeding? Submit it here. Dear Care and Feeding, My partner and I have been together for 14 years, and we love each other very much. My partner’s best friend, who is basically his brother (they’ve been best friends since high school), married my middle sister and they had a child together. BUT over the course of Best Friend’s relationship with my sister—and especially after they had a child—and ESPECIALLY after COVID—Best Friend made it clear that he was a sociopath with no real interest in being part of a family. (For example, he stole a couple thousand dollars from Sister and was emotionally and financially abusive to both her and Nibling.) He’s also taken advantage of my family in many ways, such as asking my mom for money and running a scam in which Partner unwittingly paid him cash for board games that Best Friend charged on Sister’s card (once Partner realized that, he put an end to it). Sister divorced Best Friend under very difficult circumstances, and Best Friend has not paid a penny of child support nor has he kept up his side of the visitation agreement. I have cut off all contact with Best Friend—he hurt my sister and my nibling!—but Partner and Best Friend still have a relationship. I’m trying not to judge Partner for wanting to keep Best Friend in his life. Their relationship goes back to long before Partner and I met. BUT Partner sometimes sticks up for Best Friend and claims I don’t know the whole story. I am aware that Best Friend grew up in an unstable and abusive household, but, to me, the relevant concern here is that HE HURT AND CONTINUES TO HURT MY SISTER AND NIBLING. (Sister is still terrified of the demands he may make upon her—and yes, she does have a lawyer.) Partner came home tonight after a game day with Best Friend and proceeded to tell me that Sister and Nibling are lying about some of the continued abuse they are suffering during his contact with them. Partner actually believes Best Friend over Sister and Nibling! I love Partner more than anything, but I feel like he has a terrible blind spot about Best Friend. Both my mom (who is a doctor of psychology) and my therapist agree that Best Friend is a psychopath who has been basically abusing and taking advantage of everyone (and both my family and Partner’s family have bent over backward to make him feel welcome). Partner and I had a screaming fight tonight wherein I insisted that Sister and Nibling DO NOT LIE and Best Friend is trying to ruin their lives. This is just so awful. It started out like a fairy tale (two brothers marry two sisters—well, even if Partner and I aren’t married, even if Partner and Best Friend aren’t brothers for real) and turned into a nightmare. I want to respect Partner’s right to continue his long-term friendship with Best Friend, but I can’t stand hearing him take the side of an abuser. And, for the record, Partner is incredibly wonderful and empathetic in general—it’s just this one (big) thing. What should I do? —Snow-White and Rose-Red in Real Life, but With an Unhappy Ending Dear Snow-White, I assume that in this modern fairy tale retelling, you’re the gentler, quieter sister who gets with the prince (who had once been a bear), while the more adventurous Rose-Red marries the prince’s brother. (You did make me wonder if the brother in the original tale who has never been a bear turns out to be a bad guy—a “psychopath,” as per Snow-White’s therapist and both sisters’ psychologist-mom—but that’s neither here nor there, although that would be a modern fairy tale worth reading.) Here’s what I know: Your partner and his longtime closest friend are like brothers, bound for life. Your partner is not going to turn on him. You note that, to you, the (only) relevant concern is that Best Friend hurt your sister and her child. Of course that’s your only concern—why wouldn’t it be? But it is not and cannot be the only thing that matters to your partner about this person he has known and loved for many years. You and your beloved need to agree to never speak of Best Friend, whether as the man who did your sister wrong or as a guy who’s been misunderstood. If you cannot erect a firewall around this explosive subject, and create a DMZ in which any complaints about or justification of the actions of your former brother-in-law are forbidden, then your fairy-tale ending appears doomed. Sure, you could instead ask him to choose between you and his loyalty to his friend/brother, but I suspect you won’t be happy if you do—either because he doesn’t choose you, or because he does, then resents you for it and it sours your relationship. Or you could make a choice of your own, between your sister and your partner, whom you love very much but who refuses to “just” take your side—and presumably you’ll choose your sister, which will break your heart (and thus won’t do your relationship with her any favors over the long term). It wouldn’t hurt, would it, to try my way—a cone of silence—first? Want Advice on Parenting, Kids, or Family Life? Submit your questions to Care and Feeding here. It’s anonymous! (Questions may be edited for publication.) Dear Care and Feeding, My spouse tends to treat run-of-the-mill setbacks as insurmountable problems, and I don’t know how to deal with it. Example: Last week we learned that, due to some shifting dates in our kids’ school schedules, we would not be able to stay at the beach house we traditionally book every Memorial Day weekend, because it was unavailable for the dates we could now go. To me, this wasn’t a big issue. We could book a different beach house for the following weekend, or we could book “our” beach house in August—or, you know, some other alternative. In any case, this isn’t a tragedy, it’s just life. But my spouse spiraled, going everywhere from, “If we were better parents, we’d be homeschooling, so we wouldn’t have to deal with school schedules at all,” to, “There’s no point in going on any kind of vacation,” and was in a funk for days. When they get like this, which is often, laying out the reasons not to be so distressed doesn’t help. Waiting for it to pass doesn’t help, as my spouse just gets progressively more upset because I’m not “taking things seriously.” The only thing that does help is for me to out-wallow and out-catastrophize them so that they can see that I “understand how serious this is.” But most of the time I don’t have the energy to pretend something is serious that is not serious at all. How should I respond to the next spiral? —It’s Just A Molehill Dear Molehill, This is indeed frustrating (and can put a lot of wear and tear on a relationship over the years). I’m wondering if it would help you feel less irritated and impatient if you were able to make sense of what your spouse is really feeling; i.e., what the alteration in vacation plans or other minor setback is standing in for. Because here’s the thing: While this sort of mountain-out-of-molehill-making is not a mental health disorder, it is almost certainly a symptom of one. If your spouse has an untreated anxiety disorder or depression, or is living with some other ongoing mental health issue, consistently “overreacting” to life’s ordinary mini-troubles may be both a relatively safe outlet for their (possibly constant, repressed) distress and a displacement of real feelings. The question isn’t whether your spouse is overreacting, but why they are. But you are not your spouse’s shrink, of course, and what you’re looking for, I know, is how you should react when they go from zero to 100 about a beach house’s availability. My instinct is that instead of either pointing out that what’s happened is no big deal (on some level, your spouse knows this, even if they can’t access that knowledge at the moment of the “crisis”) or jumping into the catastrophe pit with them, you might respond to each item of “cognitive distortion” (the psychiatric term for this) with calm reassurance. When your spouse leaps to “we’re terrible parents,” can you offer a reminder or two of the ways you are in fact good parents? When your spouse says there’s no point in taking a vacation, can you remind them why the family needs a vacation, how much all of you—including your despairing spouse—are looking forward to getting away somewhere together, and how much fun you’ll have? This will require patience on your part, but it does not require you to pretend to feel something you don’t—and, although you’ve found that your partner welcomes your falsified agreement that yes, indeed, the particular molehill that has triggered them is an insurmountably tall mountain, my feeling is that, in the long run, this approach will only reinforce their dysfunctional strategy. And at some quiet moment, in one of the periods between these panic-spirals, when days have passed and everything is going smoothly, initiate a gentle conversation. If you can help your spouse to see that they could use some help getting ahold of this—and, more important, understanding the underlying cause of it—it will be a boon to them. And to all of you. Need Advice? Submit to Slate’s New Advice Column. Are you struggling with your sense of worth or self image? Are you—or a loved one—dealing with the fall-out of addiction, or recovery? Have you even realized that YOU are the asshole? Slate is starting a new advice column, called Ask A.J., and we want your questions. Submit them here. Dear Care and Feeding, My husband and I have two elementary school-aged kids, and I’ve tried to be thoughtful about providing them with what amounts to age-appropriate sex education: the actual names for body parts, a theoretical knowledge about where babies come from, and modeling consent for hugs and other physical touch with our extended family and with friends and classmates. If they ask a question, I answer in an age-appropriate way, even though it often feels awkward. My husband is happy to follow my lead about physical consent, but he doesn’t have conversations about this stuff with our kids—he says it’s “too uncomfortable.” We also have 50/50 custody of his 12-year-old son, “Andy,” from a previous relationship. It’s clear that as much as Andy pretends to be above it, this 12-year-old is hearing/learning about for the first time a lot of what I’m teaching the little kids (at 12, that’s not great). I do everyday parenting with Andy but none of the big-moments stuff because his mom is sensitive about that, and that’s fine with me. I love Andy and have been in his life for quite a while, but he’s very private (even for a tween). His mom explicitly asked my husband to give Andy “the puberty talk” and, once he’s in high school, a sex talk, because she’s uncomfortable doing it. But so is my husband, who simply refuses to do it. What’s my responsibility here? Should I be pushing my husband to parent his son better? I’m honestly angry about his behavior here: Parenting is uncomfortable sometimes! It feels like both Andy’s parents are opting out of the hard stuff, but I that’s not for me to say: I try to stay out of their co-parenting relationship. But I know our school system doesn’t really offer a practical or science-based health/sex ed curriculum, so if Andy doesn’t learn it at home, he is only going to get his education from classmates and the internet down the line. —Puberty Conundrum Dear Puberty, You’re right to stay out of the co-parenting relationship, but Andy is your stepson, and your instinct that you have a responsibility to him too is spot on. If neither of his parents will step up and be parents—in matters of sex education or anything else down the line—then you’ll need to. Tell your husband that if he continues to insist that he doesn’t feel comfortable talking to his son about puberty and sex, and will not—or feels he cannot—confess that to Andy’s mother, then you’re going to have to be the point person, not only for The Talk but for all ongoing talk (because conversations about puberty and sex are not one-and-done parenting jobs). Both his mom and dad have already done him a disservice by modeling that “this stuff” is uncomfortable to talk about—something to be ashamed of. Now’s the time to help him unlearn that lesson. You might start by leaving a good book around where he will notice it and find it irresistible (not necessarily handing it to him—unless you can do this without stammering and blushing, which I mention only because you write that answering the younger kids’ questions “often feels awkward”). Then you can ask him if he has any questions, letting him know that he can ask you and talk to you about anything that’s on his mind. If he doesn’t pick up the book bait, you’ll have to take the bull by the horns. “Hey, Andy, I remember 12. It’s not easy, being 12, is it? What with not being a little kid anymore but also not being a teenager yet” would be a good start. But however you feel least uncomfortable about approaching this with him (I hope it will help if you remind yourself that he too is one of your children), the most important thing is making it clear to him that he can trust you, that he can bring questions and worries to you, and that you’re there to support him in any way he needs, always. If this ruffles his mom’s sensibilities—assuming that Andy mentions to her that his stepmom has taken on one, or any, of the “big moments” of his childhood—well, that’s just too bad. Someone needs to be the grownup, and I’m afraid it looks like you’re the only one in the room. Catch Up on Care and Feeding · Missed earlier columns this week? Read them here.· Discuss this column in the Slate Parenting Facebook group! Dear Care and Feeding, My partner and his family are lovely people, but I’m utterly exhausted by my life with them. He and I have dated for four years and lived together full-time for almost two years. He shares his kids 50/50 time with ex, so the three kids (girls, 16 and 18, and a 10-year-old son) live with us half of the time. His mom lives with us too, in a separate unit in the duplex. I like a clean, well-organized household. I raised my four kids, who are all grown up and living on their own, to be tidy and organized, reasonably self-sufficient, etc. Whereas in this household, it’s chaotic, loud, messy, and wildly disorganized unless I take the reins, so I find that I’m cooking, cleaning, doing never-ending laundry, grocery shopping, driving the kids to school and my partner to work, fixing or arranging for repairs or handling general maintenance, and everything else that ever needs to be done. Besides this, my partner’s son clings to him nonstop. Up until last year, he slept in our bed! (And then, recently, my partner actually asked one night if it would be OK if his son fell asleep in our bed!) We’ve had serious challenges changing his son’s behavior and it is really due to my partner’s permissiveness and lack of resolve. Over the last 18 months, I’ve tried to change the way things are done, and while there’s been some progress, it’s not been enough to make a real difference. I’ll attempt to leave the mess and walk away, or not cook dinner, but then the kitchen’s a disaster, my partner orders pizza three or four times a week, the laundry hamper is overflowing, and so on and so on. I’ve reached the point where I dread a future in this household. I take responsibility for the situation, as I’ve set myself up by tending to do too much (as both my partner and his mom are forever reminding me). But where do I go from here? And there’s another big issue: I’m not sure my partner really trusts me, as he has major hangups from the breakdown of his marriage. I don’t want to live in a chaotic household, where I have to do everything or nothing gets done, and have a partner who isn’t fully in it with me. What steps can I take, going forward? —Help! I’m Exhausted Dear Help, Steps to take, going forward: out the door. This is clearly not the relationship for you. Among many other things, your conflict with your partner about his son’s “behavior”—which is a display of deep anxiety for which the child needs help, which neither one of you seems to be recognizing—is sufficient reason to cut your losses now. But even if you were on the same page about the child, and were willing and able to move forward together to get him the help he needs, this is not a sustainable situation for you. Eighteen months of effort to change the household’s dynamic strikes me as more than enough: It is not going to change in the ways you need it to. I assure you that once you’re not there to do everything for them, your partner and his kids will figure out how to stay fed and have clean clothes, get to school and work, and otherwise function as a (messy, chaotic, disorganized—but so what? They’re not the ones who mind that) family. I advise you to find yourself a man whose children, like yours, are grown and gone; who is ready for a new relationship after a divorce or death, and welcomes you into his life with open arms and heart; and who is capable of getting himself to work, using a washing machine, cooking a meal or doing all the cleanup after you have cooked a meal, and so on. You’d be wise to check out how he lives, too—if you have compatible styles of cleanliness and tidiness—before moving in with him. —Michelle More Advice From Slate My mother-in-law and I don’t have a warm and fuzzy relationship, though I promise you that I am very accommodating and pleasant with her. My husband would describe her as a pretty difficult person who doesn’t have much ability to think of the world outside herself. My husband and I have been together for eight years and married for almost five. Despite having four bedrooms, being recently separated, and having only one of her children living at home, my mother-in-law does not have a guest bedroom.

Verified by MonsterInsights