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Weekly sports update February 5th to 11th

× Expand olia lialina on Unsplash Oakville Blades Results: February 7th Oakville Blades 3 vs. Cobourg Cougars 5 February 10th Oakville Blades 4 vs. Lindsay Muskies 3 Upcoming: February 13th Oakville Blades vs. Milton Mences February 15th Oakville Blades vs. Caledon Admirals February 17th Oakville Blades vs. Stouffville Spirit × West Conference Standings GP W L T OTL PTS PCT GF GA DIFF PIM STK Collingwood Blues 49 43 5 0 1 87 0.888 248 71 177 775 14-0-0-0 Milton Menace 47 34 11 2 0 70 0.745 201 134 67 800 1-0-0-0 Leamington Flyers 48 32 10 5 1 70 0.729 182 111 71 488 10-0-1-0 Buffalo Jr. Sabres 48 27 18 0 3 57 0.594 177 149 28 695 2-0-0-0 Georgetown Raiders 48 25 18 1 4 55 0.573 172 150 22 728 4-0-0-0 Burlington Cougers 47 24 16 1 6 55 0.585 180 165 15 721 5-0-0-0 Oakville Blades 45 24 18 1 2 51 0.567 146 120 26 590 1-0-0-0 Toronto Patriots 49 21 22 3 3 48 0.490 151 167 -16 799 0-2-0-0 Brantford 99ers 49 21 25 0 3 45 0.459 139 184 -45 627 0-2-1-0 Niagara Falls Canucks 48 14 33 0 1 29 0.302 134 219 -85 591 0-5-0-0 Caledon Admirals 49 7 36 1 5 20 0.204 105 226 -121 592 0-4-0-0 Mississauga Chargers 48 4 41 0 3 11 0.115 86 246 -160 890 0-11-1-0 West Conference Standing HCAA Sr. Boys Basketball Results: February 6th Christ the King 54 vs. Holy Trinity 55 St. Thomas Aquinas 50 vs. Assumption 55 February 7th Holy Trinity 76 vs. Bishop Reding 62 February 8th Corpus Christi 32 vs. St. Thomas Aquinas 58 Christ the King 35 vs. St. Ignatius of Loyola 53 Upcoming: February 13th Bishop Reding vs. St. Thomas Aquinas St. Ignatius of Loyola vs. Notre Dame St. Francis Xavier vs. Holy Trinity × East GP W L PTS WIN % PF PA STREAK Holy Trinity 12 11 1 22 0.917 756 641 W 11 Christ the King 12 8 4 16 0.667 713 616 L 3 St. Ignatius of Loyola 12 7 5 14 0.583 663 623 W 1 Bishop Reding 12 6 6 12 0.500 720 696 L 1 St. Francis Xavier 12 3 9 6 0.250 665 715 L 1 West GP W L PTS WIN % PF PA STREAK St. Thomas Aquinas 11 9 2 18 0.818 644 483 W 1 Notre Dame 11 4 7 8 0.364 521 621 W 2 Assumption 11 3 8 6 0.273 521 651 L 1 Corpus Christi 11 1 10 2 0.091 535 692 L 3 Sr. Boys Basketball Varsity Boys Hockey Results: February 5th St. Thomas Aquinas 3 vs. St. Francis Xavier 1 Notre Dame 6 vs. St. Ignatius of Loyola 1 Upcoming: February 12th St. Ignatius of Loyola vs. Holy Trinity × Varsity Boys Hockey GP W L T PTS GF GA STREAK Bishop Reding 8 7 0 1 15 49 15 W 1 Christ the King 8 5 0 3 13 26 17 T 2 St. Thomas Aquinas 8 5 3 0 10 32 27 W 1 Notre Dame 8 3 3 2 8 21 17 W 3 Corpus Christi 8 2 2 4 8 15 20 T 2 St. Ignatius of Loyola 8 3 4 1 7 23 30 W 1 Assumption 8 2 5 1 5 21 28 L 1 Holy Trinity 8 2 5 1 5 17 28 L 1 St. Francis Xavier 8 0 7 1 1 11 33 L 6 Varsity Boys Hockey Sr. Girls Volleyball Results: February 6th St. Ignatius of Loyola 0 vs. Bishop Reding 2 Holy Trinity 2 vs. St. Francis Xavier 0 Corpus Christi 2 vs. St. Thomas Aquinas 0 February 8th St. Ignatius of Loyola 0 vs. Christ the King 2 Bishop Reding 0 vs. Holy Trinity 2 Upcoming: February 12th St. Thomas Aquinas vs. Christ the King St. Ignatius of Loyola vs. Notre Dame Bishop Reding vs. Holy Trinity × Sr. Girls Volleyball MP W L T PTS SW SL PW PL STREAK Notre Dame 9 8 1 0 16 17 3 474 328 W 2 Corpus Christi 9 8 1 0 16 16 2 401 239 W 2 Christ the King 9 6 3 0 12 13 6 417 323 W 1 Bishop Reding 9 6 3 0 12 13 8 447 382 L 1 Holy Trinity 9 6 3 0 12 12 6 425 341 W 4 St. Thomas Aquinas 9 4 5 0 8 9 11 361 347 L 1 Assumption 9 3 6 0 6 7 13 399 413 L 1 St. Ignatius of Loyola 9 3 6 0 6 7 13 386 424 L 2 St. Francis Xavier 9 1 8 0 2 2 16 216 438 L 5 St. Kateri Tekakwitha 9 0 9 0 0 0 18 159 450 L 9 Sr. Girls Volleyball HSSAA Sr. Boys Basketball Results: February 6th White Oaks 48 vs. Gaetan Gervais 63 Aldershot 49 vs. Sainte-Trinite 52 February 7th Nelson 50 vs. Garth Webb 59 Craig Kielburger 50 vs. Iroquois Ridge 67 Upcoming: February 12th Iroquois Ridge vs. King’s Christian Garth Webb vs. Frank Hayden February 15th Frank Hayden vs. King’s Christian Sainte-Trinite vs. Milton × Tier 1 GP W L T PTS WIN % PF PA STREAK King’s Christian Collegiate (AA) 9 8 1 0 16 0.889 656 369 W 4 Frank Hayden S.S. (AAA) 9 8 1 0 16 0.889 593 483 W 4 Garth Webb S.S. (AAA) 9 7 2 0 14 0.778 616 511 W 2 Iroquois Ridge H.S. (AAA) 9 7 2 0 14 0.778 553 442 L 1 Craig Kielburger High School (AAA) 9 4 5 0 8 0.444 503 517 L 1 Nelson High School (AAA) 9 4 5 0 8 0.444 472 412 W 1 Abbey Park H.S. (AAA) 9 3 6 0 6 0.333 436 564 L 3 Georgetown D.H.S. (AAA) 9 3 6 0 6 0.333 414 451 L 2 Oakville Trafalgar H.S. (AAA) 9 1 8 0 2 0.111 374 538 L 6 M.M. Robinson H.S. (AAA) 9 0 9 0 0 0.000 288 618 L 9 Tier 2 GP W L T PTS WIN % PF PA STREAK T.A. Blakelock H.S. (AA) 8 7 1 0 14 0.875 481 387 W 6 Milton D.H.S. (AAA) 8 6 2 0 12 0.750 499 355 W 1 E.S. Gaétan Gervais (A) 8 6 2 0 12 0.750 461 419 W 5 Aldershot High School (AA) 8 5 3 0 10 0.625 472 425 L 1 E.S. Sainte-Trinité (A) 8 5 3 0 10 0.625 418 359 W 1 White Oaks High School (AAA) 8 4 4 0 8 0.500 348 325 W 2 Burlington Central H.S. (AA) 8 2 6 0 4 0.250 369 415 L 6 Elsie MacGill S.S. (AA) 8 1 7 0 2 0.125 382 432 L 5 Acton D.H.S. (A) 8 0 8 0 0 0.000 186 499 L 8 Sr. Boys Basketball Sr. Girls Hockey Results: February 6th Georgetown 2 vs. Garth Webb 3 Nelson 0 vs. Oakville Trafalgar 4 February 7th Abbey Park 1 vs. Burlington Central 5 Blakelock 8 vs. Milton 0 February 8th Aldershot 0 vs. Oakville Trafalgar 5 Georgetown 3 vs. Blakelock 0 Upcoming: February 13th Garth Webb vs. Abbey Park Blakelock vs. Oakville Trafalgar February 15th Robinson vs. Abbey Park Nelson vs. Garth Webb × Sr. Girls Hockey GP W OTW SOW L OTL SOL T PTS GF GA STREAK Oakville Trafalgar H.S. (AAA) 9 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 27 42 8 W 9 Georgetown D.H.S. (AAA) 9 7 0 0 1 0 1 0 22 41 11 W 1 Garth Webb S.S. (AAA) 8 6 0 1 1 0 0 0 20 32 11 W 2 Nelson High School (AAA) 9 5 0 0 4 0 0 0 15 39 24 L 2 T.A. Blakelock H.S. (AA) 9 5 0 0 4 0 0 0 15 24 11 L 1 Burlington Central H.S. (AA) 9 4 0 0 5 0 0 0 12 24 33 W 1 M.M. Robinson H.S. (AAA) 9 4 0 0 5 0 0 0 12 22 24 W 2 Abbey Park H.S. (AAA) 8 3 0 0 5 0 0 0 9 24 23 L 1 Frank Hayden S.S. (AAA) 9 3 0 0 6 0 0 0 9 22 20 L 3 Milton D.H.S. (AAA) 9 1 0 0 8 0 0 0 3 8 58 L 1 Aldershot High School (AA) 8 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 2 57 L 8 Sr. Girls Hockey Sr. Boys Hockey Results: February 6th Oakville Trafalgar 2 vs. Nelson 9 Milton 0 vs. Blakelock 3 February 7th Garth Webb 3 vs. Georgetown 2 Upcoming: February 12th Georgetown vs. Oakville Trafalgar February 14th Blakelock vs. Nelson Robinson vs. Iroquois Ridge February 15th Garth Webb vs. Aldershot Iroquois Ridge vs. Frank Hayden Oakville Trafalgar vs. Milton × Sr. Boys Hockey GP W OTW SOW L OTL SOL T PTS GF GA STREAK Nelson High School (AAA) 9 6 2 0 0 0 1 0 23 34 8 W 8 Garth Webb S.S. (AAA) 9 6 0 1 1 1 0 0 21 35 23 W 5 Frank Hayden S.S. (AAA) 9 6 0 0 3 0 0 0 18 34 18 W 1 Iroquois Ridge H.S. (AAA) 8 4 1 1 1 1 0 0 17 22 15 W 5 Georgetown D.H.S. (AAA) 9 4 0 0 4 1 0 0 13 25 21 L 3 Oakville Trafalgar H.S. (AAA) 9 3 1 0 3 0 2 0 13 27 32 W 1 Aldershot High School (AA) 9 3 1 0 4 0 1 0 12 22 25 W 1 T.A. Blakelock H.S. (AA) 9 3 0 1 4 1 0 0 12 22 35 W 1 Milton D.H.S. (AAA) 8 2 0 0 5 1 0 0 7 18 28 L 1 M.M. Robinson H.S. (AAA) 9 1 1 1 6 0 0 0 7 17 26 L 1 Craig Kielburger High School (AAA) 8 0 0 0 7 1 0 0 1 13 38 L 8 Sr. Boys Hockey Sr. Girls Volleyball Results: February 7th Sainte-Trinite 0 vs. Burlington Central 2 February 8th Blakelock 2 vs. Iroquois Ridge 1 Frank Hayden 1 vs. Abbey Park 2 Georgetown 0 vs. Oakville Trafalgar 2 Upcoming: February 12th Craif Kielbuger vs. Oakville Trafalgar Blakelock vs. Abbey Park February 14th Blakelock vs. Oakville Trafalgar × Tier 1 MP W L T PTS SW SL PW PL STREAK Abbey Park H.S. (AAA) 12 12 0 0 24 24 2 623 402 W 12 Oakville Trafalgar H.S. (AAA) 12 11 1 0 22 22 2 590 333 W 4 Craig Kielburger High School (AAA) 12 10 2 0 20 20 7 592 506 W 6 T.A. Blakelock H.S. (AA) 12 8 4 0 16 18 10 603 499 L 1 Iroquois Ridge H.S. (AAA) 12 8 4 0 16 17 10 587 515 W 4 Georgetown D.H.S. (AAA) 12 6 6 0 12 14 13 546 511 W 4 Nelson High School (AAA) 12 6 6 0 12 14 14 583 544 L 1 Frank Hayden S.S. (AAA) 12 5 7 0 10 14 15 574 561 L 3 Milton D.H.S. (AAA) 12 4 8 0 8 11 17 528 560 L 4 Aldershot High School (AA) 12 4 8 0 8 9 17 509 537 L 4 White Oaks High School (AAA) 12 2 10 0 4 5 21 370 588 L 4 M.M. Robinson H.S. (AAA) 12 2 10 0 4 4 21 373 589 W 1 Garth Webb S.S. (AAA) 12 0 12 0 0 1 24 275 608 L 12 Tier 2 MP W L T PTS SW SL PW PL STREAK Burlington Central H.S. (AA) 9 9 0 0 18 19 4 511 360 W 9 Elsie MacGill S.S. (AA) 9 6 3 0 12 14 7 453 399 W 1 Acton D.H.S. (A) 9 3 6 0 6 9 13 426 448 L 2 E.S. Sainte-Trinité (A) 9 0 9 0 0 0 18 269 452 L 9 Sr. Girls Volleyball

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UNITED NATIONS-CLIMATE-Guyana says ‘analysis needed’ on impact of conflict on food, climate security

Follow Follow Us Home News Full News Sports Full Sports Business Politics Features Press Releases Headline News Interviews Contact Us CaribVision Archives 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 TRENDING About Us Advertise With Us Job Opportunities Membership Login Home » News » Full News » UNITED NATIONS-CLIMATE-Guyana says ‘analysis needed’ on impact of conflict on food, climate security UNITED NATIONS-CLIMATE-Guyana says ‘analysis needed’ on impact of conflict on food, climate security by staff writer February 14, 2024 Full News No Comments 74views UNITED NATIONS, Feb 14, CMC – Guyana has called fo… You are unauthorized to view this page. Username Password Remember Me Reset Password Follow Us

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Autism: Man gives up on dating apps after ghosting

Being ghosted, misunderstood and judged is how an autistic man has experienced dating apps. Andrew Edwards, 39, said there needs to be more support for autistic adults who are looking for romance. He has given up on online dating after six years of trying, describing them as “demoralising”. Being autistic does not mean you have an illness or disease. It means your brain works in a different way from other people. “The constant ghosting is quite confusing for someone with autism,” Andrew said. “Due to this my moods could fluctuate quite wildly depending on replies and my stress levels were affected quite greatly.” Andrew, from Wrexham, used both conventional and autism-specific sites, and while he says he has learned from his experience and feels “less naive” now, his experience was not good. “If people behave like that on the street to someone, it wouldn’t be acceptable,” he said. Andrew added that scrolling on the apps also played on his “obsessional nature”, as well. Andrew requires 24-hour care form his sister Mel after his mother died after developing pneumonia following Covid-19. “I am articulate and knowledgeable but I require 24 hour care off my sister… a lot of people just don’t get this,” he said. Andrew has a busy life. He has a close family, plays cricket and trains at the gym several times a week, as well as working part time for an autism charity. But the lack of a romantic partner weighs heavily. Andrew says there must be other neurodiverse people who feel the same as him, and says local friendship or dating groups for people on the autism spectrum could help. He has tried to set up a group himself, but faced difficulties and found it too stressful to organise. “There’s a lack of support and funding for those with autism who are adults… our services are geared towards youngsters,” he said. “I would love to attend a group that could lead to possible romantic relationships. “People don’t judge as much (in person) as they do behind their phone screen.” Andrew’s friend, former community nurse Mai Rees Moulton, has known him since he was a teenager, when she taught relationship and sex education at his school. She says she would love Andrew to find a girlfriend, but also believes that meeting someone face to face would suit him better. “Obviously he has got a really full life, but it would be so nice for him to meet someone special because he’s got so much to give, and he would make somebody a lovely partner. “It would have to be someone very special for them to be right for each other.” Autism is a lifelong developmental disability which affects how people communicate and interact with the world. Autistic people often have difficulties with interpreting both verbal and non-verbal language like gestures or tone of voice. Some are unable to speak or have limited speech. Autistic people can have difficulty “reading” other people – recognising or understanding others’ feelings and intentions. Many autistic people find the world unpredictable and confusing place and they like routines so that they know what is going to happen. Anxiety is a real difficulty for many autistic adults, particularly in social situations or when facing change. There are about 700,000 autistic adults and children in the UK and one in every 100 people is on the autistic spectrum. Source: National Autistic Society

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Why many L.A. ambulances probably aren’t racing to emergencies

The lights and sirens of emergency medical services are pervasive in the United States. Not only are our screens saturated with them, but it’s hard to go far in any large city without seeing an ambulance race by. The public often assumes that the vehicle is on its way to a life-or-death emergency. But those who have worked in EMS know that is overwhelmingly not the case. What started in the 1960s as an answer to rapidly increasing carnage on the nation’s freeways has evolved into a complex subspecialty of American healthcare. Early research on the field demonstrated that prompt emergency medical care benefits a small subset of patients, namely those who suffer cardiac arrest and certain kinds of severe trauma. The hugely successful marketing of the 911 system also drove the expansion of EMS. Between 1980 and 2010, while the U.S. population increased 36%, the country’s fire departments experienced a 267% explosion in EMS runs. The number of life-threatening emergencies obviously didn’t grow that rapidly, so what happened? The EMS system got too good at its job — not the job of saving lives so much as the job of showing up in a matter of minutes at any time, day or night, for anyone who dials those three numbers. As affordable access to healthcare continued to erode, 911 was a reliably, readily available substitute. In its fifth decade, the modern EMS system doesn’t look much like it did when it was formed. In most cities, it’s become a catchall for everything that can fall through the cracks in our healthcare networks: communities with poor primary care access, homeless populations, and people with mental illnesses and substance abuse problems, to name a few. All these people need and deserve access to healthcare. The trouble is that EMS systems were not designed to handle this volume or breadth of patients. While emergency medical services are less expensive than byzantine hospital systems, they are by no means cheap. EMS is a labor- and equipment-intensive industry that struggles to recruit personnel, collect insurance reimbursement and, more recently, transfer patients to emergency rooms in a timely fashion. As a result, its ability to respond to any rapid increase in demand for care is very limited. Take the Los Angeles Fire Department, which responded to nearly half a million calls for service in 2022 — a 10.3% increase from 2018 — for a ratio of 1 response per 7.8 residents. To accomplish this feat, the department staffs approximately 150 ambulances per day out of its 106 fire stations. While that sounds like a lot of resources, the truth is that it’s only enough to cover 0.004% of the population at any given time. This is just one example of the vulnerability of our overburdened EMS system. Further exacerbating the difficulties in providing EMS coverage, use patterns are notoriously uneven; certain neighborhoods rarely use the system, while others rely on it for most of their healthcare. But it can’t just be removed from neighborhoods that don’t use it much. Unhoused people are an extreme example of these divergent patterns. They represent only 0.8% of the population but account for 10.2% of the city’s EMS calls, using the service at 14 times the rate of housed residents. Recognizing that it’s hard to improve something you don’t measure, the LAFD has been a leader in EMS research. One example was an evaluation of more than 33,000 calls for abdominal pain over a three-year period to see how many turned out to be life-threatening emergencies. The answer, astoundingly, was just seven. Los Angeles is not alone; the staggering growth of nonemergency calls has plagued services around the country. A 2021 study of nearly 6 million 911 calls involving nearly 1,200 U.S. agencies found that while 86% of the responses sent crews racing with lights and sirens on, less than 7% resulted in a potentially lifesaving intervention. The repercussions of inadequate healthcare run rampant in EMS calls and emergency departments. Only 8% of Americans 35 and older receive all recommended preventive services and screenings, and 1 in 8 of those ages 12 to 65 doesn’t have health insurance. Complications from diabetes, uncontrolled hypertension, obesity and alcohol use overwhelm the healthcare system in volume and cost. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 90% of U.S.healthcare spending goes to treat chronic conditions. As EMS has been pulled into filling the gaps, it’s become clear that it’s not sustainable or effective in that role. Meanwhile, its ability to respond effectively to life-threatening emergencies has been strained. Many local leaders are aware of this and looking for answers. The strategies they have deployed include referring nonemergency calls to nurse hotlines, employing alternative transportation to sobering facilities and urgent care clinics, and bringing mental health practitioners to patients. Much effort has been expended trying to discourage nonemergency 911 calls with minimal success. It’s become apparent that the answer isn’t dissuading the public from calling 911 as much as it is changing what happens when the calls come in. One stumbling block has been accurately identifying non-life-threatening conditions. EMS systems have generally opted to err steeply on the side of tolerating nonemergency calls to avoid liability. Refining dispatch algorithms and integrating physician and nurse assessment may help alleviate the impulse to just send an ambulance. Ultimately it will be necessary to view 911 centers as healthcare hubs and ambulance transport as just one spoke for delivering it. The ability to triage patients as an emergency room does and send the appropriate response — whether an ambulance, taxi or mobile laboratory — may help conserve resources. Above all, any large-scale solution will require systemwide primary care access for 911 callers. The ultimate goal — one our modern EMS system has largely lost sight of — is to help people get the most appropriate and effective care. Jon Nevin is a battalion chief for a Southern California fire department and a longtime emergency medical services practitioner and researcher.

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Why we need “Rhapsody in Blue” more than ever as it turns 100

I’m not sure when I first listened to George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue,” which premiered 100 years ago this week, from start to finish. Snippets had played throughout the soundtrack of my life as a child and teen — the opening ceremony of the 1984 Olympics at the L.A. Memorial Coliseum, random cartoons, commercials for United Airlines, cameos in Disney productions. It’s one of those classical pieces, like Beethoven’s Fifth and Ninth symphonies and Bach’s spooky Toccata and Fugue in D minor, that long ago left orchestra halls to entrench themselves in the American psyche. When I finally got through “Rhapsody in Blue” in its entirety, it was the aural equivalent of the Big Bang. The wailing, breathless clarinet solo that kicks things off. The wry tubas and trombones that accentuate the opening section. The thunderous drums and cymbals that announce the beginning and end of movements. Elegant violins. Piano chords that jaunt along during solos and rise above the swirling, clashing chaos, demanding to be acknowledged. The composition was a revelation. It swaggered and stomped and skipped. It was unpretentious and rollicking — nothing that I had known classical music to be — and sparked an admiration for Gershwin’s creation that grows the more I learn about him and his times. As orchestras around the country celebrate “Rhapsody in Blue” throughout 2024, it’s important to think of the piece as more than just music. In a year when Americans are fretting about our democracy in ways we haven’t for decades, it tells the saga of this nation — and offers a way forward. As Gershwin often recounted, he wrote “Rhapsody in Blue” in a rush after reading a newspaper article reminding him of his promise to debut a new concerto mixing classical music with the jazz that was riveting the nation’s cool set at the time. Looking for a muse, the 26-year-old found one in the clangs, hisses and whistles of a train trip to Boston. That base allowed Gershwin to construct “a sort of musical kaleidoscope of America, of our vast melting pot, of our unduplicated national pep, of our metropolitan madness,” he told a music critic in 1931. His final product nailed it, both musically and thematically. Hints of Cuban clave rhythms, Tin Pan Alley harmonies, Jewish melodies and piano licks swim through its overarching Romantic theme. The messy pace — alternately defiant, maudlin, weepy and bombastic — sounds like a country that was working things out within itself but nevertheless remained optimistic and confident about its future. There was no better person to envision this sonic tribute to the United States than Gershwin. He never attributed any explicit political significance to “Rhapsody in Blue,” because he didn’t have to. He was the child of working-class Jewish immigrants who fled the tyranny of the Russian Empire for a chance at a better life in New York. His work wrestled with the questions that every second-generation American faces. Do you maintain the customs of the old country, reject them completely to fully assimilate into mainstream society, or do you grab the best of the two and mix it with what you pick up from other cultures? Like many second-generation kids, he chose the latter scenario and lived it with gusto. Gershwin made his decision in a city teeming with people from around the world, in a nation that saw the influx of foreigners as alien and threatening. Three months after the debut of “Rhapsody in Blue,” President Coolidge signed the Johnson-Reed Act. It severely curtailed immigration from Southern and Eastern Europe and created the Border Patrol to keep out Asians and Mexicans — the antithesis of everything that Gershwin’s ode to America celebrated. “Rhapsody in Blue” is most identified with New York, as it should be — Gershwin was a Gothamite, he debuted it in Manhattan, and the best recording of it remains Leonard Bernstein conducting the Columbia Symphony in 1959 while playing the piano (too bad Bradley Cooper didn’t re-create the scene in his recent Bernstein biopic, “Maestro”). Yet we in Los Angeles should also claim a part of Gershwin and his genius. He decamped to Southern California with his brother Ira to plug away in Hollywood, seeing better times in Los Angeles instead of the East Coast. But George’s career was cut tragically short when he died in 1937, at just 38, after surgery to remove a brain tumor. One could only imagine what Southern California, gateway to Latin America and Asia, might have taught Gershwin had he lived. His tour de force is aspirational, inspirational and offers lessons for all of us. Yet there’s always been pushback against the brilliance of “Rhapsody in Blue.” Bernstein once told the Atlantic that it was “a string of separate paragraphs stuck together with a thin paste of flour and water” and not “a real composition,” even as he described Gershwin as “my idol.” In recent decades, scholars have accused Gershwin of cultural appropriation for daring to be a Jewish man who fused his love of Black music with classical music — a fusion that reached its apogee with the opera “Porgy and Bess.” Recently, composer Ethan Iverson wrote in the New York Times that “Rhapsody in Blue” was “the worst masterpiece” in the classical canon, describing it as “Caucasian,” whatever the hell that means. To think of it as corny and antiquated and “white” misses its revolutionary potential. Thank God the public has understood its truth all along. There’s a reason why it’s a standard that symphonies trot out whenever they need a sellout (the Los Angeles Philharmonic will play it at the Hollywood Bowl this summer, site of many iconic performances featuring Gershwin’s oeuvre). Why eyes glisten as people rise from their seats when the orchestra reaches the rousing conclusion. It’s unabashedly hopeful and proud of this country’s mess. It dares you to feel the same. It’s America at its best.

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Police fires tear gas shells again on 2nd day of farmers protest

Congress leader Rahul Gandhi spoke to injured farmer Gurmeet Singh, who participated in the Delhi Chalo march on Tuesday. He said Gurmeet Singh was seriously injured in police atrocities during the farmer’s protest. He said the dictatorial attitude of the Modi government towards the country’s protector and food provider has put democracy to shame. He asked Singh about his health and showed his support for the peaceful movement demanding their rights. The conversation between Rahul Gandhi and farmer Gurmeet Singh took place over a phone call which was facilitated by Punjab Pradesh Congress Committee president Amarinder Raja Warring. The farmer Gurmeet Singh had been admitted to government hospital in Rajpura town of Patiala district. Farmers clashed with the Police on Tuesday at two border points between the states and faced tear gas, water cannons as they tried to breach the security barricades to continue their protest towards the national capital. He condemned the police action and assured Singh that he is with him and told him not to worry. Gandhi praised Singh’s efforts and encouraged him with Shabash and best wishes. On Tuesday the farmer leaders had accused the central government of an attack on protesters which caused 60 injuries due to tear gas shells at Punjab-Haryana border points. 24 policemen were also injured during the farmer protests which also included the superintendent. Earlier Rahul Gandhi reacted to the protest and said the Congress if voted to power, will give a legal guarantee of Minimum Support Price (MSP) to every farmer as per the Swaminathan Commission. The Congress leader took to X and wrote farmer brothers, today is a historic day! and the Congress has decided to give legal guarantee of MSP to every farmer on crops as per the Swaminathan commission. This step will change the lives of 15 crore farmer families by ensuring their prosperity.

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Andrew Tate said real men don’t eat gummy bears and was schooled into next year (and it’s only February)

Self-styled king of the toxic manosphere Andrew Tate went on Twitter to offer up a whole bunch of free fitness tips. Pqrticularly helpful, presumably, if you find yourself unable to leave your house. Tate, who remains in Romania as he awaits trial on rape and human trafficking charges, nailed his credibility 100% to the mast […]

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Two Seoul police officers convicted over deadly Halloween crowd crush

SEOUL: A South Korean court sentenced two former senior police officers on Wednesday (Feb 14) for destroying evidence linked to Seoul’s deadly 2022 Halloween crush – the first police officials to be sentenced over the disaster. Tens of thousands of people – mostly in their 20s and 30s – had been out on Oct 29, 2022, to enjoy the first post-pandemic holiday celebrations in the popular Itaewon nightlife district. But the night turned deadly when people poured into a narrow, sloping alleyway between bars and clubs, the weight of their bodies and a lack of effective crowd control leading to nearly 160 people being crushed to death. The two former police officers were handed jail time for ordering in the aftermath of the disaster the deletion of four internal police reports which had identified in advance safety concerns over possible overcrowding in the area. The Seoul Western District Court sentenced Park Sung-min, a former senior intelligence officer at the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency, to one-and-a-half years in prison, and Kim Jin-ho, a former intelligence officer at the Yongsan Police Station to one year in prison, suspended for three years. “The defendants should have actively cooperated with the investigation by preserving existing data, but on the contrary, they deleted or arbitrarily destroyed internal reports written prior to the accident and destroyed evidence,” the court said. The court added that “harsh punishment” was inevitable as they “made it difficult to determine the substantial truth by minimising and concealing the responsibility of the police”. Park and Kim are the first police officers to be convicted over the Itaewon disaster. In January, Kim Kwang-ho, the head of the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency, was charged with professional negligence. District level officials have been prosecuted over the disaster, but no high-ranking members of government resigned or have faced prosecution, despite criticism from victims’ families over a lack of accountability. South Korea’s rapid transformation from a war-torn country to Asia’s fourth-largest economy and a global cultural powerhouse is a source of national pride. But a series of preventable disasters – such as the 2022 crush and the 2014 Sewol ferry sinking that killed 304 people – has shaken public confidence in authorities.

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The WWI soldiers who sewed for sanity: New exhibition tells how troops injured on the Western Front…

To the War Office, the thought of soldiers doing embroidery led to fears that it would make them weak. Officials believed that letting men take up needlework would ‘effeminise’ them. But, as a new exhibition reveals, embroidery proved to be an effective tonic for injured troops who had experienced the horrors of the trenches in the First World War. It was proved to be such a successful form of therapy that, in the Second World War, commercial embroidery packs were made available for injured soldiers. The display at the Fusilier Museum in Warwick shows some of the colourful works produced by recovering Tommies. They include a depiction of daffodils produced by Private Austen Albert Ward, who lost part of one of his legs in 1918 and took up embroidery while in hospital. A new exhibition reveals how embroidery proved to be an effective tonic for injured troops who had experienced the horrors of the trenches in the First World War. Above: Private Austen Albert Ward in his hospital bed with one of his works on his lap Private Austen Albert Ward lost part of one of his legs in 1918 and took up embroidery while in hospital. Above: His depiction of daffodils Private Ward had spent four years fighting in the war and was just months away from making it through uninjured when he was hit by a bomb. The 24-year-old, from Ashted, Birmingham, was shipped back to England and, like many other injured soldiers, took up embroidery. A picture shows him convalescing in his hospital bed while surrounded by nurses as one of his works lies next to him and a man – possibly another recovering soldier – holds up another embroidery behind him. Another intricate piece of needlework, which depicts a bouquet of flowers, was brought back from France by soldier Albert Randall. He gave it to his sweetheart Lily as a token of his affection, before tragically being killed in a trench raid outside Arras in northern France in November 1917. Chris Kirby, manager of the Fusiliers Museum, said: ‘In the First World War there was an official War Office line. Another intricate piece of needlework, which depicts a bouquet of flowers, was brought back from France by soldier Albert Randall Randall with his sweetheart Lily. He was killed during a trench raid outside Arras in northern France in November 1917 The works are on show at the Fusilier Museum in Warwick until May 25 The exhibition features artwork from the 1899 Second Boer War to the Suez Crisis in 1956 The works that soldiers produced were often complex and included the colours and mascots of their regiments. At the new exhibition, the antelope mascot of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment is a common theme on many of the works Another embroidery, dated 1955, includes depictions of Egypt ‘They wanted to deter the practice because it was feared that it would effeminise the men and make them weak. ‘All the time they were fighting to create a disciplined, macho camerarderie-focused force. They were quite anti the idea of soldiers going off and making embroidery.’ The works that soldiers produced were often complex and included the colours and mascots of their regiments. At the new exhibition, the antelope mascot of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment is a common theme on many of the works. Other embroideries have a photograph of a soldier at its centre. They acted as a powerful memorial of the military career of a son or father. After the war, many soldiers who could no longer do the jobs they used to do because of their injures were trained up to do needlework to make a living. Some of the soldiers who could not do the jobs that they did before the war were in hardship, they came up with the scheme where they could be trained up to do needlework to make money. After the war these soldiers were doing embroidery to make a living. ‘By A Thread – Embroidery & Needlework in Wartime’ spans from the 1899 Second Boer War to the Suez Crisis in 1956. It is being held at Pageant House, on Jury Street in Warwick until May 25. It is free to enter as part of the general museum admission. Tickets to the museum are £5 for adults and £4 for veterans, over 65s and students.

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No news yet about potential new Patriarch Kirill-Pope Francis summit — Russian ambassador

MOSCOW, February 14. /TASS/. No information is available yet concerning preparations for a potential new meeting between Patriarch Kirill of Moscow and All Russia, head of the Russian Orthodox Church, and Pope Francis, head of the Roman Catholic Church, but direct contacts between the churches continue, Ivan Soltanovsky, Russian Ambassador to the Vatican, said in an interview with TASS. “The embassy does not have any information about preparations for another meeting between Patriarch Kirill and Pope Francis,” the ambassador said. “As the experience of the truly historic meeting of the leaders in Havana [on February 12, 2016] showed, its organization was carried out along church lines, so the question is better addressed to the Moscow Patriarchate.” “Direct and fairly regular contacts between the churches continue, as we are aware,” the Russian ambassador to the Holy See noted. The first meeting between Patriarch Kirill and Pope Francis was in 2016 in Havana. It resulted in the signing of a 30-point joint declaration, one of the main clauses of which called for rendering joint assistance by Orthodox believers and Catholics for their fellow Christians in the Middle East and North Africa who are subject to persecution.

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